Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition

From 1d4chan
Jump to: navigation, search
Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition
DD4Elogo.gif
RPG published by
Wizards of the Coast
Authors Monte Cook
Chris Perkins
First Publication 2009
Essential Books Dungeon Master's Guide
Player's Handbook
Monster Manual
Player's Handbook 2
Player's Handbook 3
Monster Manual 2
Monster Manual 3
Dungeon Master's Guide 2
Heroes of the Fallen Lands
Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms


System[edit]

The fourth edition of Dungeons & Dragons, the newest and therefore most controversial edition of the system. See D&D Next.

Basics[edit]

Nearly every roll consists of making a single d20 roll, plus a modifier, against a target number. Saving throws have been replaced with Defenses that work like AC; the term 'Saving Throw' now refers to a 55% (DC 10) roll every turn to recover from a persistent effect.

Character Generation[edit]

Chargen is simplified compared to 3rd Edition (although still time consuming). Skills are all-or-nothing, you either have training in them or you don't. Each character gains a selection of Powers which can be used at will, once per encounter, or once per day, in ascending order of power. These abilities often consist of an attack plus some special effect, such as knocking someone prone, setting them on fire, or moving yourself or your opponent. There are also five possible alignments, none of which have much effect on gameplay any more: Lawful Good, Good, Unaligned, Evil and Chaotic Evil.

Races[edit]

The character races in the PHB are:

In addition to the races in the PHB, the following player races are in the MM and other sourcebooks: (all of them are "LA +0", to put things in 3.5 parlance):

Character races in the PHB 2 are:

Character races in the PHB 3 are:

Character races in the Eberron Player's Guide are:

Character races in the Forgotten Realms Player's Guide are:

Character races in Heroes of Shadow are:

Character races in Heroes of the Feywild are:

Character races in the Dark Sun Campaign Setting are:

Classes[edit]

Character classes in the first PHB consist of:

4e Classes table
  Leader Defender Striker Controller
Martial Warlord Fighter Ranger
Rogue
Divine Cleric
Runepriest
Paladin Avenger Invoker
Arcane Bard
Artificer
Swordmage Warlock
Sorcerer
Wizard
Bladesinger
Primal Shaman Warden Barbarian Druid
Seeker
Psionic Ardent Battlemind Monk Psion
Shadow Assassin
Vampire
Blackguard
Binder

Classes from the second PHB are:

  • Avenger (Role: Striker, Power Source: Divine)
  • Barbarian (Role: Striker, Power Source: Primal)
  • Bard (Role: Leader, Power Source: Arcane)
  • Druid (Role: Controller, Power Source: Primal)
  • Invoker (Role: Controller, Power Source: Divine)
  • Shaman (Role: Leader, Power Source: Primal)
  • Sorcerer (Role: Striker, Power Source: Arcane)
  • Warden (Role: Defender, Power Source: Primal)

Classes added in the third PHB are:

  • Ardent (Role: Leader, ower Source: Psionic)
  • Battlemind (Role: Defender, Power Source: Psionic)
  • Monk (Role: Striker, Power Source: Psionic)
  • Psion (Role: Controller, Power Source: Psionic)
  • Runepriest (Role: Leader, Power Source: Divine)
  • Seeker (Role: Controller, Power Source: Primal)

Classes in other books include:

  • Artificer (Role: Leader, Power Source: Arcane) from the Eberron Campaign Guide
  • Assassin (Role: Striker, Power Source: Shadow) from Dragon Magazine 379
  • Bladesinger (Role: Controller, Power Source: Arcane) from the Neverwinter Campaign Setting
  • Swordmage (Role: Defender, Power Source: Arcane) from the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide
  • Vampire (Role: Striker, Power Source: Shadow) from Heroes of Shadow
  • Warlock (Binder) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Shadow) from Heroes of Shadow
  • Paladin (Blackguard) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Divine) from Heroes of Shadow
  • Assassin (Executioner) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of Shadow
  • Wizard (Shi'ar) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of Elemental Chaos
  • Sorcerer (Elementalist) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of Elemental Chaos
  • Wizard (Mage) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of the Fallen Lands
  • Fighter (Knight) (Role: Defender, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Fallen Lands
  • Cleric (Warpriest) (Role: Leader, Power Source: Divine) from Heroes of the Fallen Lands
  • Rogue (Thief) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Fallen Lands
  • Fighter (Slayer) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Fallen Lands
  • Wizard (Witch) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of the Feywild
  • Druid (Protector) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Primal) from Heroes of the Feywild
  • Barbarian (Berserker) (Role: Defender and Striker, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Feywild
  • Bard (Skald) (Role: Leader, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of the Feywild
  • Ranger (Hunter) (Role: Controller, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms
  • Paladin (Cavalier) (Role: Defender, Power Source: Divine) from Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms
  • Druid (Sentinel) (Role: Leader, Power Source: Prime) from Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms
  • Warlock (Hexblade) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Arcane) from Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms
  • Ranger (Scout) (Role: Striker, Power Source: Martial) from Heroes of the Forgotten Kingdoms

Gameplay[edit]

Gameplay is divided into encounters. The GM selects monsters and traps up to a total experience value as recommended for the size of the party, and the encounter plays out as a tactical miniatures game. Non-combat encounters consist of "skill challenges", where skill checks (sometimes of multiple types) are made in sequence. XP is awarded for non-combat challenges and quests, as well as for combat encounters.

Each character can take one standard action (such as an attack), one move action, one minor action, and any number of free actions per turn. Each character also gets one immediate interrupt or immediate reaction per round, which may be used outside of the regular turn order. Generally each character will use their standard action to make use of an attack power. Characters are highly specialized as noted above, and fit into combat roles of controller (status effect and mass-attack focused), defender (durability and counter-attack focused), leader (buffing and healing focused), and striker (single target damage focused).

Characters level up from level 1 to 30; with the scope of the game changing every ten levels. At level 30 characters are expected to undergo some form of apotheosis, but the game is totally broken at this level anyway. Hey, at least this is one thing it has in common with D&D!

Setting[edit]

The setting of 4e is highly generic and designed to give the DM a relatively blank canvas to paint on. This default setting consists of a wild medieval landscape in which isolated human and demihuman communities ('Points of Light') struggle to survive after the fall of a greater empire. This provides an explanation for the large areas of wilderness and many ruins for monsters to hide in, and the need for adventurers as opposed to more regulated militias.

The Planescape cosmology, present in 2e and 3e, has been removed, and a much vaguer "Astral Sea" cosmology has been put in its place. Sigil still exists as the center of the multiverse. The new Astral Sea or "The Plane Above" is an amalgamation of the Ethereal Plane and the Astral Plane (including the floating corpses of dead gods and primordials). The Astral Sea contains the realms of the gods, including Celestia, Pandemonium, Carceri, Baator, Gehenna (formerly known as Tytherion), Acheron (Chernoggar), Arcadia (Hestavar), Arborea (Arvandor), and a few new ones.

Then there's the Elemental Chaos, "The Plane below", which is kind of like a combination of the Inner Planes and a bit of Limbo, slapped together into a realm of destruction and elemental power. This is where the Primordials resided before the Dawn War, and is the location of the Abyss.

The DMG contains an extensive section explaining the tropes of the setting and how they might be used, and also suggesting ways in which the DM can deviate from them to make the setting his own.

D&D Essentials[edit]

D&D Essentials was an attempt to appeal to players more comfortable with older editions of D&D. It featured classes more similar in structure D&D 3.5, but still using the structure of character powers to attempt to maintain the modular nature of D&D 4e.

D&D 4e on /tg/[edit]

The reaction of some fans.

Since its announcement 4e has been a source of controversy and trolling on /tg/. Its supporters consider it to have made D&D simple and fun. Its critics have numerous objections to the system and setting, often referring to it as 'shit twinkie' (with the implication that they had been expecting a certain type of D&D goodness and sorely disappointed by what was actually delivered). More cogent arguments against 4th Edition by people not out of their fucking minds tend to decry 4th over some of its perceived issues (character homogenization, signed-in-blood role reinforcement, et al).

/tg/ being /tg/, it is virtually guaranteed that any discussion of 4th Edition will result in Rage between 3e, 4e, and D&D Next supporters, and ergo, result in the entire thread being reduced to a pile of burning trollery within a few minutes.

Fandom[edit]

Though /tg/ frequently jokes that they don't actually exist, 4th has some legit fans, fabled creatures spoken of in whispered legends across the imageboards. There are many rumors of these "fans", but most reports say that they are mostly nice folk who recognize the game's flaws but still want to play and share it with people for fun, making them either a very tragic folk or just... Folk. The fanatic, ferocious 4efag or "4rry" may be a rare breed, but one to be wary of! It is said that logic and previous editions bounce off its hide, and the best way to escape alive is to wave a D&D Insider subscription to their nose, chuck it in the other direction, and run, praying to the gods. This doesn't matter anymore because they are no longer supported nor the new edition so 4e can safely be discarded as some mad mans fever dream now.

The most dedicated unpaid fanwork based on 4e would be the Touhou Power Cards, although it's difficult to say whether these weaboo fags are using Touhou to be 4e fans, or 4e to be Touhou fans, or perhaps using Touhou as an overly-elaborate satire of the 4e concept of class powers. It's likeliest the second, as Touhou fans cannot enjoy anything else without tying it in to their bullet hell shooter. Of course, there's always one thing two things that have been far worse with this phenomenon....

See also[edit]

External Links[edit]