Adventurer's Guild

From 1d4chan

The Adventurer's Guild is a new take on Quests, originally written by BDasher, in which players do not assume collective control over a single character, but rather create a character to their own liking, roll stats and set off to get shit done in/for the world's last Adventurer's Guild. A more detailed explanation along with some examples will be written later, but for now here's the rules. At the moment, this page is about 5% rules and 95% lists of items.

Remember that the majority of these things have been made up on the spot and can be modified or ignored as wished.

General Idea and Chargen[edit]

The Billboard, source of many a great adventure. Or, y'know, going shopping.
  • /tg/ saves the world's last Adventurer's Guild and, through that, the world.
  • The Savage Invasion has shattered society and returned Wildnerness to the world. Adventurers are needed to tame it once more.
  • Pick a name, a class and a race. Anything goes, except by Guildmaster veto.
  • Roll for Str/Dex/Int/Wis/Con/Cha/Lck, d100, arranged as desired.
  • Roll under your stat to beat a check.
  • Buy shit at the Guild, for the Guild or invest to improve it.
  • Complete Quests to gain Renown for the Guild.
  • Renown brings in higher-pay jobs and NPC Adventurers who buy shit and gather Renown for the Guild as well, making your job easier.
  • You can post your own jobs on The Billboard.
  • Though individuals or groups can go on actual adventure's (since, as Old McGuck said, "We're not the Knitter's Guild, after all!") the main story focus is in the Guildhall at all times.
  • Boast about successfully completed Quests to others, simply because you can!
  • Eventually lead expeditions to beat back the Savage Invasion and re-tame the Wilderness!

Crunch[edit]

The Billboard[edit]

The Billboard, which must always be written with capital letters because it's that important, is where you will find all the jobs available.

Stats[edit]

Guild Level

Guild Level affects the state of the building as well as the quality and quantity of available supplies.

Guild XP

Guild XP is gained by buying upgrades through investment or savings from purchases, or by completing certain quests.

Renown Level

Renown Level affects the number and strength of NPC adventurers, as well as the number and pay of quests.

Renown

Renown is gained through quest completion, or player-organised events like a tournament or witch hunt.

Combat[edit]

Combat is rather simple as it's not really the focus, at least not for now: The fighting player rolls for Strength, Dexterity and Constiution, in that order. Strength determines wether or not you hit, Dexterity wether or not you are hit and Constitution decides if you can take the hit.

Cooking and Nourishment[edit]

Cooking[edit]

If you want to cook something, you need three things: the Recipe, the Tool and the Ingredients. All of these may vary depending on your Guildmaster and your own creativity, but some examples are shown below.

Examples of Meals[edit]
Food[edit]

Soup

  • Difficulty: Very Simple
  • Nourishment Value: Very Low
  • Cost if Bought: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Ingredients if Made: Any Meat (1X) or Any Plant (1X)

Burger

  • Difficulty: Very Simple
  • Nourishment Value: Low
  • Cost if Bought: 1 Gold Piece
  • Ingredients if Made: Any Meat (1X)

Stew

  • Difficulty: Simple
  • Nourishment Value: Medium
  • Cost if Bought: 1 Gold Piece
  • Ingredients if Made: Any Plant (1X) and Any Meat (1X)
Drinks[edit]

Water

  • Cost: Free
  • Effect: Pass a Constitution Check to Refresh Yourself (Reroll a previously failed Check)

Milk

  • Cost: 1 Silver Piece
  • Effect: Pass a Constitution Check with a -10 bonus to Refresh Yourself (Reroll a previously failed Check)

Gin

  • Cost: 3 Silver Pieces
  • Effects: Refresh yourself

Ale

  • Cost: 3 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: Refresh Yourself

Wine

  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: Refresh Yourself Properly (reroll two previously failed Checks)

Scotch

  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: Refresh Yourself Properly

Nourishment[edit]

Nourishment keeps track of your hunger. It has six stages: Stuffed, Full, Normal, Hungry, Starving and Dead. Nourishment drops one category for every day an Adventurer goes without three meals.

  • Food with a Very Low Nourishment Value does not increase Nourishment, but it does prevent it from dropping once (so, if you'd go from Starving to Dead next morning, but you eat something with a Very Low Nourishment Value, it won't drop.)
  • Food with a Low Nourishment Value increases Nourishment by one.
  • Food with a Medium Nourishment Value increases Nourishment by two.
  • Food with a High Nourishment Value increases Nourishment by three.
  • Food with a Very High Nourishment Value increases Nourishment by four.

List of Items[edit]

Here are some examples of items that can be used. Like the entire concept, this list and anything on it can be altered or ignored by the Guildmaster.

Tools[edit]

Copper Pickaxe[edit]
  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: -10 Bonus on Mining-related Strength checks, can be used as an improvised weapon for a -5 bonus.
Bronze Pickaxe[edit]
  • Cost: 7 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: -15 Bonus on Mining-related Strength checks, can be used as an improvised weapon for a -10 bonus.
Cast Iron Pickaxe[edit]
  • Cost: 1 Gold Piece
  • Uses: -15 Bonus on Mining-related Strength checks, can be used as an improvised weapon for a -10 bonus.

Cooking and Kitchenware[edit]

Copper Cooking Pot[edit]
  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple meals with a bonus of -10 on your check, Cooking Simple meals. Success at a passed Wisdom Check.
Cast Iron Cooking Pot[edit]
  • Cost: 7 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple and Simple meals with a bonus of -10 on your check.
Brass Cooking Pot[edit]
  • Cost: 1 Gold Piece
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple and Simple meals with a bonus of -10 on your check, Cooking Decent meals.
Copper Frying Pan[edit]
  • Cost: 3 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple meals. Success at a passed Wisdom Check. Portable.
Cast Iron Frying Pan[edit]
  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple meals with a bonus of -10 on your check. Portable.
Brass Frying Pan[edit]
  • Cost: 8 Silver Pieces.
  • Uses: Cooking Very Simple meals with a bonus of -10 on your check, Cooking Simple meals. Portable.

Maps[edit]

City Map[edit]
  • Cost: 3 Gold Pieces
  • Effect:-15 Bonus on initial wayfinding-related Int Checks in the city
World Map[edit]
  • Cost: 3 Gold Pieces and 5 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: -15 bonus on initial wayfinding-related Int Checks in the world.

Weaponry[edit]

Fighting unarmed results in a +10 penalty in all comnbat-related Strength Checks!

Dagger[edit]
  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: -5 bonus on combat-related Str Checks
Short Sword[edit]
  • Cost: 3 Gold Pieces
  • Effect: -10 bonus on combat-related Str Checks
Club[edit]
  • Cost: 5 Silver Pieces
  • Effect: -5 bonus on combat-related Str Checks
Warhammer[edit]
  • Cost: 3 Gold Pieces
  • Effect: -10 bonus on combat-related Str Checks
Molotov Cocktail[edit]
  • Cost: N/A - Special Ability
  • Effect: Destroys low-to-mid-level enemies immediately and grievously harms high-level foes. A Dex check must be passed for this to take effect. One Molotov Cocktail is used up whether the check is passed or not.

Miscellaneous Rules[edit]

Bragging Rights and Titles[edit]

Bragging Rights and Titles are gained by meeting certain goals (which are often made up on the spot and consist of being Awesome or . They often confer small bonuses (-5 or -10) to specific checks and are a measure of skill which can awe fellow Adventurers.

Bartering[edit]

Bartering is the fine art of talking to people, using your glib tongue to convince them to give you a discount on what you want. Bartering checks are made with Charisma. The following list will tell you the rate of success/failure.

  • Success by beating Charisma: you convince the shopkeeper to take 1 gold off the price
  • Success by equalling Charisma: you talk the shopkeeper into taking 5 silver off the price
  • Failure by a difference of less than 20: no effect
  • Failure by a difference of 20+: pissed off shopkeeper, either the price is increased or you are kicked out of the shop

Theft[edit]

Thieving can be done by passing a Dexterity check, with possible penalties and bonuses depending on the number of bystanders and how suspicious/alert they are, the size of the item, et cetera. Naturally, anyone catching you will be rather agitated, especially if it's their stuff you're stealing!