Disney Villains Victorious

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Disney Villains Victorious is a /tg/ homebrew project based on the glorious idea of a world, not entirely unlike our own, in which (almost) all the villains from (almost) all the Disney animated feature films were not defeated at the ends of their movies but were instead victorious, completing their goals in part or in whole.

It is a world in which Ursula rules the seas, defied only by the uncatchable Pirate Lords and the might of Atlantis. It is a world where the grasslands, the jungles and the forests are prowled not only by fearsome primal beasts like Shere Khan and Scar, but also by the ruthless, tireless hunters that stalk them. It is a world where Europe has been divvied up between sorcerous queens like Maleficent, inquisitorial clergymen like Frollo, and dark gods like Hades and Chernabog.

It is not, however, a world completely devoid of courage, heroism or hope. Around the world, the Player Characters and their allies plot, plan, fight, strive and win their own victories against the villains that would rule them. The time to fight and to be free is now.


[Also, take note that we're open to movies that are not properly Disney but that still fit with our main goal: to be Disney as Fuck™. Eldorado is in and several other movies may get in at a later point in time.]

Official forum: http://s15.zetaboards.com/Villains_Victorious

Google Drive: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B8z4Cy1zaGU1R0ZMSlhlUnBobFk&usp=drive_web

TV Tropes page: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/TabletopGame/DisneyVillainsVictorious

Discord Channel: https://discord.gg/sDANQ5x

The world of Disney Villains Victorious

The Kings of Evil[edit]

Stats for these characters and others can be found on the Disney Villains Victorious Kings and Villains page.

The Sorcerer Kings

  • Sorcerer-Sultan Jafar of Agrabah
  • Maleficent the Faerie Queen
  • Grimhilde the Fair Queen of the Mirror Kingdom
  • The Horned King of Prydain
  • Doctor Facilier of the Shadowlands
  • Queen La of the Leopard Kingdom
  • Elsa the Frozen Queen of Arendelle
  • Empress Yzma of the Sunless Empire
  • Pontifex Immortalis Frollo of the Grand Archdiocese
  • Tzekel-Kan of El Dorado


The Human Kings

  • Shan-Yu of the Hun Dynasty
  • Governor Radcliffe of Virginia
  • Imperial President Lyle Tiberius Rourke of the Imperial Republic of Atlantis
  • Alameda Slim, Sheriff of the Old West
  • Charles Muntz, Percival McLeach, William Clayton, Gaston LeGume, Amos Slade, Buldeo and King Fergus of the Elite Global Huntsman Club
  • Chairman Cutler Beckett of the East India Trading Co.
  • General Santa Anna of the Empire of Mexico


God Kings and Spirit Lords

  • Hades of Olympia
  • Ursula of All-Oceans
  • Chernabog the God of Night, Lord of Bald Mountain
  • The Spirit Realm
  • Master Gracey of Gracey Manor
  • Oogie Boogie of Oogie Town


Beast Kings

  • Scar, High King of the Pridelands
  • King Louis of the Kingdom of the Red Flower
  • Bagheera, Lord of the Free Creatures
  • Shere Khan of the Shere Khanate
  • Kaa the Ancient of the Subjugate of Kaa
  • Mor'du of the Land of the Bear
  • King Ratigan of the Under-Empire
  • King Leonidas of the Island of Naboombu

System Mechanics:[edit]

The most common roll is 3d6 + Attribute + Skill.

The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be pretty easy is 15.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be normal is 20.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be challenging is 25.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be difficult is 30.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be pretty hard is 35.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be almost impossible 40.
The Target Number for something a Player Character would consider to be the STUFF OF LEGENDS is 45.

In the case of a tie between two Rolls, the highest roll is the one with the highest bonus. If it's still a tie, flip a coin to determine which roll should be considered the highest.

Combat[edit]

To attack someone you roll 3d6 + Attribute + Skill.
Attribute and Skill can be Robustness and Melee, Agility and Ranged, Charm and Deceit, Sensibility and Persuasion, or any other combination you can conceivably use to hurt someone, to break his will to fight or to make him reconsider his life.

To avoid an attack you roll 3d6 + Attribute + Skill.
Which Attribute and which Skill depends on how you are being attacked: Robustness or Agility + Prevent Harm to avoid physical attacks, Charisma + Endure to avoid social pressure, Sensibility + Endure to avoid being hurt by your opponent's lies, Intelligence + Endure to avoid being hurt by mind attacks. And so on.
Serious enemies do the same, while simple mooks, instead of rolling, just add 3 to their Attribute and Skill.

If the roll of the aggressor beats the roll of the defender, the aggressor deals one Strike to the Defender. If the margin of success of the aggressor is 10 or more, he deals two Strikes instead. 20, three Strikes instead. And so on.
If he takes a Strike and has no Strikes remaining, the Defender is defeated. Whether this means killed, knocked out, brought to tears, intimidated into submission or made to doubt his loyalties and leave the battle is up to the combination of Attribute and Skills used by the aggressor.

Player Characters and serious enemies don’t go down after the first Strike: they can take more than one. Player Characters can take 3 Strikes without going down. Any Strike after that finally takes them out.
Resisting the Strikes is, of course, an abstraction: the arrow just grazed you, the sword left you with only a flesh wound, your fall was broken by a soft landing spot, the social pressure wasn't enough to completely break you, your enemy's lies didn't manage to make you truly doubt yourself.

After a character takes a Strike, if he’s not down already, he’s going to carry that Strike around. He should write down on his sheet whether this Strike was Physical or Mental, so he doesn't forget.
The Strikes a character is carrying are erased from his sheet each morning. Physical Strikes can also be removed by using Science while resting, the same way mental Strikes can be removed by using Science (again), Persuasion or Deceit while resting.
A character can lose a Strike by fulfilling one of his Ideals or by doing something extremely cool that relates to his identity as a character.

Speed[edit]

A normal human has a Speed equal to his Robustness + his Agility.This Speed shows how many meters he can normally cover in one Turn.

During his turn, a character can spend one of his Moves to double his Speed. He can also spend two Moves to quadruple his Speed.


Rounds and Turns[edit]

Rounds last 10 seconds. During each Round every character involved in the action gets one Turn.

During each Turn, a character can cover a distance equals to his Speed. He also gets 2 Moves.

Each Move can be spent to do stuff. As a general rule, any action that requires an active Roll also takes up a Move. Each Move can be spent to double the character Speed for that turn.

Initiative[edit]

To decide which character involved in the action gets to act first, everyone rolls 3d6 + Initiative. The Initiative of each character is equal to his Agility. Initiative gets its own spot on the character sheet, since it could be individually raised by Traits or Powers.

The character with the highest Initiative roll takes his Turn first. Everyone else goes after him, moving down from the second highest Initiative roll to the lowest Initiative roll.

Attributes[edit]

Every character has the same 5 Attributes:

Robustness: How physically BIG you are. Not in the size sense, but in the ripped, tough or muscley sense. Mike Tyson has high Robustness.
Agility: How coordinated and dexterous you are. Also how steady your hands are, if it comes down to that. A surgeon needs high Agility.
Intelligence: How smart you are, how well you can recover information from memory and how quick your are when doing calculations. Milo Thatch was very Intelligent,
Sensibility: How perceptive, intuitive and shrewd you are. It's really a measure of how much attention you pay to the world around you. Sherlock Holmes has high Sensibility.
Charm: How charming you are. How strong your force of personality is. How much people like you. This is of course disconnected from your looks, but not really. A suave con man is very Charming.

An average Non Player Character has a 7 in every Attribute, with 4 being the crippling human minimum and 12 being the amazing human maximum. High Tier characters can go even higher than that.

Players Character begin with a 6 in every Attribute and have 10 points to spread around. Until they reach a new Tier, the highest they can get in an Attribute is 12.

Will[edit]

Each Player Character has 3 Will Points. He can spend these points whenever he wants.

By spending one Will Point, a character can:
 Grant himself a +3 bonus to a roll he’s about to make,
 Reroll a roll he just made,
 Stop being affected by a magic effect that’s affecting him, or
 Add details or make minor changes to the scene that would help him out.

A character gets back his Will Points each morning.
A character can also get one Will Point back by fulfilling one of his Ideals or by doing something extremely cool that relates to his identity as a character.

Species[edit]

The average character is a Human. Human Player Characters can never go lower than 6 or higher than 12 in their Attributes, unless they move up a Tier. Humans Players Characters begin the game with three Traits, instead of the one or two Traits other species get.

A Beast (more information in the Core Book) Player Character gets various bonuses and special powers, but he also begins the game with only one Trait of his choice. Thanks to the bonuses and penalties of his species, a Beast Player Character can go lower than 6 and higher than 12 in his starting Attributes.

Chimera is a catch all term for those creatures between man and beast. They include cartoon animals, mix and match monsters, and the denizens of the Sunless Empire. To create a Chimera, choose a primary and a secondary species. Then select one racial Trait each from the Chimeric Trait list in the Core Book.

Basic Roles[edit]

Each Player Character belongs to one of the five Basic Roles. The Basic Roles, one for each Attribute, are very general concepts, easily customizable thanks to Traits, Powers and choice of Skills.

Strong Guy:

  • He gets a rank in Athletic and a rank in Prevent Harm.
  • Having HUGE GUTS and an even bigger heart, he can safely take 4 Strikes instead of 3.
  • He rolls 4d6 and drops the lowest die every time he rolls on ROBUSTNESS!
  • He gets a Power of his choice taken from the Strong Guy’s list.

Nimble Guy:

  • He gets a rank in Acrobatics and a rank in Prevent Harm.
  • Being way faster than normal, he gets a +5 bonus to his Speed and ignores the speed penalties you normally get when climbing or moving in stealth.
  • He rolls 4d6 and drops the lowest die every time he rolls on Agility.
  • He gets a Power of his choice taken from the Nimble Guy’s list.

Smart Guy:

  • He gets a rank in Academic, Science, Mechanic or Occult.
  • Having always one more trick up his sleeves, he gets 4 Will Points instead of 3.
  • He rolls 4d6 and drops the lowest die every time he rolls on Intelligence.
  • He gets a Power of his choice taken from the Smart Guy’s list.

Sensible Guy:

  • He gets a rank in Insight.
  • Knowing very well both himself and the people around him, he never gets Strikes from illusions or from the Skill Deceit.
  • He rolls 4d6 and drops the lowest die every time he rolls on Sensibility.
  • He gets a Power of his choice taken from the Sensible Guy’s list.

Charming Guy:

  • He gets a rank in Deceit, Music or Persuasion.
  • Being a fast talker and a fast singer, he gets one extra Move each turn that he can use to roll on Deceit, Music, Intimidate, or Persuasion, but only against Mooks.
  • He rolls 4d6 and drops the lowest die every time he rolls on Charm.
  • He gets a Power of his choice taken from the Charming Guy’s list.

Skills[edit]

Every character has the same 22 Skills.

Untrained Skills are equal to 0. The first time you put a point in a Skill, that Skill goes up to 3. Every point you spend on that Skill after the first only raises it by one. So, from 0 to 3, from 3 to 4, from 4 to 5 and from 5 to 6. While normal humans can't get past 6 in a Skill, High Tier Characters can go even higher than that. An average guy has a 3 in all those Skills that most relate to his identity. Player Characters begin the game with 0 in every Skill and have 10 points to spread around. Until they reach a new Tier, the highest they can get in a Skill is 6. If a skill you need for your campaign (say, Profession: Agricultural Engineer) is not already in the game, you may add it as a custom Skill as long as it doesn’t override an already existing skill.

  • Academics: Remembering or calling up knowledge from the humanities or non-science inhumanities.
  • Acrobatics: Jumping, balancing on things, climbing up things, and gymnastics.
  • Athletics: Running long distances, climbing for long periods of time, and more running.
  • Brawl: Martial arts and all forms of unarmed combat. In the case of beasts, it also includes natural weapons. This is rolled against someone else’s Prevent Harm.
  • Craft: Used to create things. You should have the tools and material on your hands, but time and difficulty are largely set by the GM. Traits involving Crafts can involve a crafting specification, such as Craft: Clocks or Craft: Marionettes.
  • Deceit: Used to Strike at an enemy in a Social manner, or convince somebody of a lie or falsehood. Deceit is also used for creating or maintaining disguises. This is rolled against someone else’s Endure.
  • Driving: Piloting any water, ground, and air vehicles that you are familiar with. If you've never driven a vehicle, you can't drive one without either an hour of instruction or a day of practice. If you've never driven a specific kind of vehicle in particular before, you need eight hours to get used to this kind of vehicle before you do anything stupid. Driving doesn't cover regular, boring driving - it covers stunt driving or trying to escape fast. In the case of travelling long distances, Drive may be used in the place of Travel if you are driving to reach your destination.
  • Endure: Avoiding to take a Strike from any mental, spiritual, or social attack. Usually, you would avoid them using Sensibility or Intelligence. It is also used to avoid taking Strikes from poison, dehydration, heat, sunlight, or other attacks that cannot be avoided with Prevent Harm.
  • Insight:Detecting someone trying to deceive you, judge someone's emotional state if they're trying to hide it, spot things, search for things, or hear things. It's a wide range of finding and perceiving. Always rolled with Sensitivity.
  • Intimidate: Striking at an enemy in a Social manner. Also used to coerce someone to agree with you or submit to your will. This is rolled against someone else’s Endure.
  • Legerdemain: Sleight-of-hand, minor 'magic' tricks, and escaping bonds/squeezing through spaces. For thieving characters, it also covers larceny.
  • Linguistics: Decipher ancient languages, crack a code, or speak in code. You know a number of languages (other than your own) equal to your level in Linguistics. This includes speaking ‘animal’ (Organized by group, such as Mammals, Lizards, or Birds) and speaking ‘human’ for animals. Beasts speaking ‘human’ could be speaking a language, but is more often somehow magically communicating. Unless otherwise stated by your Game Master, all humans speak English.
  • Mechanics: Repair mechanical devices, or disable them in a more complex way than smashing them. The Mechanics skill is also used to pick locks or handle clockwork. As Atlantean tech is state of the art in Disney Villains Victorious, special training (or at least extreme familiarity) is required to safely work with it.
  • Melee: Usage of all melee weapons (one and two handed), but not unarmed combat. This is always rolled against someone else’s Prevent Harm.
  • Music: Playing music, which can be used once per scene to grant a bonus to the roll of another character that can hear you or sing along with you. When you start your musical number, choose either a specific skill or your party in a fight. If your roll reaches Target Number 20, you grant everyone in your party a +3 bonus to that Skill or to every attack your group makes. For every 5 points over TN 20, this bonus increases by 1. TN20 grants +3, TN25 grants +4, TN30 grants +5 and such forth. This bonus lasts until the beginning of your next Turn.
  • Occult: Remembering or calling up knowledge about magic, magicians, and supernatural creatures. In some cases, Occult can be used to perform acts of magic.
  • Persuasion: Striking at an enemy in a Social manner. Also used to convince somebody of your point of view or get them to otherwise agree with you. This is rolled against someone else’s Endure.
  • Prevent Harm: Avoid taking a Strike from a physical source. This could involve taking the hit and toughing it out with Robustness, or dodging the hit and avoiding it entirely with Agility.
  • Ranged: Using any and all ranged weapons. If you aren't familiar with a particular ranged weapon, it takes a day of practice (or an hour of training with a skilled instructor) to use the weapon properly. You can use the weapon without training at a -4 penalty. This is rolled against someone else’s Prevent Harm.
  • Science: Remembering or calling up knowledge from the sciences or scientific humanities. Science can also be tested against TN20 to remove a Strike from a resting ally in the span of five minutes. For social Strikes, consider this giving them some ‘happy pills’ and calming them down with a pep talk or something.
  • Stealth: Hiding from people and moving around without being detected. What did you think 'stealth' was? This is always rolled against someone else’s Insight.
  • Travel: Riding animals, traveling large distances, finding your way, and not getting lost without navigational tools. The general survival skill.

Traits[edit]

Traits are particular bonuses, abilities and specializations that make each character a little bit more special and unique. Regardless of their Basic Role, characters can use their Traits to further customize themselves.

Every Player Character that picked Human as a Species begins the game with 3 Traits. Beasts get to choose only one Trait, since they already have natural Traits of their own. During the game, Players Characters can spend Lessons to buy more Traits. If possible, every Trait should be a Disney reference or at least a pop culture reference of some kind.

Usually, a Trait should give a +1, +2, or +3 bonus to certain specific applications of 1, 2, or 3 Skills. The more specific these applications are, the bigger is the bonus granted or the number of Skills it applies to.

For example, the Trait-

This Man is Obviously a Charlatan - You gain a +2 on Insight checks against people who are obviously villains.

-could be changed to give a +3 bonus if the condition was: "against people who are obviously villains and that you already saw hurting somebody". Instead of making the bonus bigger, the same very specific condition could be extended to a +2 bonus to Prevent Harm as well.

As a general rule, Traits shouldn't apply to every possible use of a roll: You don't want them to become the absolute best choice for every character who likes using that Skill. Also, Traits should never give bonuses to Attributes.

Powers[edit]

Powers are large and usually temporary bonuses that the system gives to Player Characters and Villains. Players Characters begin the game with one Power they chose from their Basic Role’s list. During the game, they can get more Powers by trading in Lessons. Players Characters also begin the game with one extra Power of their choosing. This Power can come from their Role's List, or players may create their own from scratch.

As a general rule, the character should spend a Will point to activate one of his powers, but some powers, like

Ride'm! - You can ride any animal large enough to carry your weight as if it was an animal trained for the purposes of Travel.

-are entirely passive.

Powers should provide big bonuses to Skills or create meaningful, flashy effects. However, a Power should never guarantee a success unless it is a Villain power (In which case go ahead, they're supposed to have the advantage).

An example of a solid (if bland) Power would be-

Force Of Will - You can spend a Will Point to gain +5 to your Endure Rolls for the rest of the Scene.


The following Powers are exclusive to each Class, and can be picked up by any character of that class. The Powers each Players Character gets from his basic Role come from this Lists.

Role Powers:

Strong Guy:

  • Charge of the Light Brigade: When charging into odds that are certain death (or at least near-certain death), you may spend a Will Point. Gain a +5 bonus to all rolls for the rest of the Scene as long as your life is in immediate danger.
  • Clank Clank Clank: While wearing heavy armor, you may spend a Will Point. Double your movement speed for the next three turns and gain +3 to all Melee rolls made in this time.
  • Test your Might: Spend a Will Point to challenge an enemy to HONORABLE, SINGLE COMBAT. Neither you nor the target may attack others while in single combat, nor may you be attacked by outside forces. You and your target must close to melee as soon as possible. This effect lasts 3 Rounds.

Nimble Guy:

  • Fastest Fingers In All The Lands: Spend a Will Point. You gain a +5 bonus to Mechanics, Acrobatics, and Athletics checks for the remainder of the scene.
  • An Impressive Performance: Spend a Will Point. Gain a +5 bonus to Acrobatics or Athletics for the rest of the scene and you may use it in the place of Music. Additionally, your movement speed doubles.
  • Draw!: Spend a Will Point. You gain an extra action this turn, and gain a +5 bonus to do a trick shot with a Ranged weapon (such as shooting the weapon out of someone's hands).

Smart Guy:

  • I Read About That!: Spend a Will Point. Gain +3 to the next Academics, Occult, or Science roll you make. Roll twice and take the better result.
  • No More Chinese Laundry: Spend a Will Point to assemble an explosive from everyday materials. Must have something on hand that could conceivably explode -- can't just magic bombs out of thin air. Coconuts are okay. At the end of the round you have at least one pound of highly unstable explosive material that will miraculously not go off in your hands. We'll leave it to you as to what to do with it.
  • Work, Damn You!: Spend a Will Point. For the rest of the scene, you have +5 to Mechanics and Drive as long as your focus is entirely on the task at hand.

Sensible Guy:

  • Pierce the Truth: Spend a Will Point. Grant your allies a +5 bonus to overcome Fear and +5 to recognize Illusions.
  • I'm Gonna Need You to Fill These: Spend a Will Point. Test Science against TN20. If you succeed, then one ally has all their Strikes healed. You may continue attempting this for the next three Rounds.
  • Ever Thought About Unionizing?: Spend a Will Point to test Persuasion against a group. TN 10+1 for every person in the group. If you succeed, everyone in the group takes a Social Strike. Does not work against Villains, Kings or Gods.

Charismatic Guy:

  • Rock and Roll Will Never Die: Spend a Will Point; Apply Music against Tin-Ear characters with only a -5 in effectiveness!
  • Everybody Hold It!: Spend a Will Point. +5 bonus to halting a fight in progress via diplomacy or just shouting loudly. You have three rounds to stop the fight from resuming.
  • How Dashing: Spend a Will Point; +5 to Deceive and Persuasion as long as you are doing something suitably ridiculous like dancing in front of armed guards.


Powers are mostly up to GM discretion, and should really only be balanced against the Powers of the rest of the group.

Ideals[edit]

Ideals are small things that a character would like to do or that would further his line of growth. They don't need to be big and grandiose: they just need to be something a character truly believes in. Fulfilling an Ideal in a meaningful way restores one Strike and one Will Point, plus it gives out one Lesson at the end of the session.

A good example of an Ideal would be:

Get into trouble,

which gives the character a reason to do something (probably stupid) and to move the story along. Or, it could be something like:

Get Glory,

which would result in the player doing things for their own sake. Not particularly heroic, but we're not here to judge.


Goals[edit]

A Goal is something a character knows, deep within his heart, that he must accomplish.

A character at Zero tier has 1 Zero Goal, 1 On-A-Roll Goal and 1 Heroic Goal. A character at On-A-Roll tier has 1 Zero goal, 2 On-A-Roll goals and 1 Heroic goal. A character at Heroic tier has 1 Zero goal, 2 On-A-Roll goals and 2 Heroic goals. This means that whenever a character advances a tier, they must choose a new goal corresponding to their new tier.

Goals are one of the main mechanical means of character development: When every character in the party has achieved at least 1 goal of their current tier, the entire party advances a tier. This means that if you are a dirty minmaxer, you should pick a goal of your current tier that will coincide with another player's goal of the current tier.

Goals should be suitably large undertakings, but (at least in the beginning) Players should avoid having "take down (King X)" as a Goal, as that is something he probably won't be able to accomplish until his party is well into the higher Tiers. Instead, Players should settle for something more like "free your land from Alameda Slim's grip", or some other large, difficult but non impossible goal. Of course, Goals don't need to be strictly heroic: they could very well be something like "Personally take down a full grown Tyrannosaurus Rex", which is a perfectly normal Goal for a hunter character.

Lessons (Experience)[edit]

Experience is earned in form of Lessons.

You get one Lesson every time you:
 fulfill one of your Ideals in a meaningful way,
 take a meaningful step towards one of your Goals,
 get out of a dangerous situation.


You can spend your accumulated Lessons to:
 get new Skills,
 increase Skills you already have, or
 raise your Attributes or to get new Traits.

How much Lessons you need depends on the learning curve you are playing by:

Fast Progression
 Skill: 2 Lessons; Trait: 4 Lessons; Attribute: 6 Lessons; New Power every 10 Lessons.

Medium Progression
 Skill: 2 Lessons; Trait: 5 Lessons; Attribute: 8 Lessons; New Power every 10 Lessons.

Slow Progression
 Skill: 2 Lessons; Trait: 6 Lessons; Attribute: 10 Lessons; New Power every 15 Lessons.


Tiers[edit]

There are 3 Tiers that Player Characters can achieve: Zero, On-a-Roll, and Hero.

Zero is the Tier that every Player Character begins the game on. The rules for it are the rules we explained up until now.

On-A-Roll is the second Tier. Player Characters on this Tier get one more Will Point and can safely take one Strike more than they could when they were Zero Tier characters. Also, they can now raise their Skills up to 7 and their Attributes up to 14. Additionally, Player Characters of each Basic Role now roll 5d6 instead of 4d6 every time they roll on their favorite Attribute, and 4d6 instead of 3d6 on every roll of a different attribute of their choice. They still keep the 3 best results in both cases.

Hero is the third Tier. Player Characters on this Tier get one more Will Point and can safely take one Strike more than they could when they were On-a-Roll Tier characters. Also, they can now raise their Skills up to 8 and their Attributes up to 16. Additionally, Player Characters now keep an extra 1d6 to all their rolls, still keeping three, so their favorite attribute would be 6d6 keeping the best three, their second favored 5d6 keeping the best three, and all other rolls 4d6 keeping the best three.

Equipment[edit]

In Disney Villains Victorious, Equipment, as a necessity of the system, is an abstraction. Equipment refers to any item that provides a skill bonus when used. A starting character gets 5 free Equipment Points (EP) to spend on purchasing Equipment at character creation. Weapons to fight with, books to learn with, and masks to lie with are all considered in Equipment. A single piece of Equipment can provide bonuses to several different skills, but the EP price will be as high as an item that provides a large bonus to a single skill.

WEAPONS

If you want to attack using the Melee or Ranged skills, you first need a weapon. Unless you put Equipment points into the attacking type of a weapon, your weapon cannot attack that way. An example would be a +1 Melee Knife that cannot be used as a throwing weapon unless it has at least +1 in Ranged.

Most weapons should adhere to the following guidelines.

  • One Handed Weapons would be +1 Melee.
  • Two Handed Weapons would be +2 Melee.
  • Handguns and side arms would be +1 Ranged.
  • Rifles would be +2 Ranged.
  • Anything that provides +3 bonus should have an appropriate drawback or is unique and magical in some way. In other words, probably not something for starting characters.
  • Thrown Weapons can rely on Robustness or Agility, but Ranged Weapons rely on Agility unless otherwise noted by your Traits or Powers.
  • Dual wielding weapons grants an additional +1 bonus to whatever weapon skill is currently being used in the main (read; attacking) hand.

Here are some example weapons to play around with.

  • Great Swords give +3 to Melee, but can only be used effectively by someone with Robustness 10. Anyone with less Robustness than that takes a -1 penalty for every point of difference between his Robustness and 10.
  • Crossbows give a +3 bonus to Ranged, but it takes two consecutive Moves to reload them.
  • Bows can only be used effectively by someone with Robustness 8. Anyone with less Robustness than that takes a -1 penalty for every point of difference between his Robustness and 8.
  • Shotguns give a +3 bonus to Ranged, but can only be used effectively by someone with Robustness 10. Anyone with less Robustness than that takes a -1 penalty for every point of difference between his Robustness and 10.
  • Extremely well done or just straight up advanced weapons (like the sword of a prince or the crystal arms of Atlantis) grant a bonus one point higher than average of their kind. They are, however, incredibly hard to get ahold of without the right connections.

SHIELDS

  • Shields provide +1 Prevent Harm.

ARMORS

  • Light Armor provides +1 Prevent Harm
  • Medium Armor provides +2 Prevent Harm
  • Heavy Armor provides +3 Prevent Harm, but decreases your Movement Speed by 4 meters and Agility by 1 point.

BOOKS

  • Books provide +1 to Academics, Science or Occult, depending on their content.

There are many different kinds of Equipment that your character can start with that are not covered here. Your GM has the final say on what your character can and cannot have at character creation.

Character Creation[edit]

1: Choose a Species and Country of origin.
2: Assign Attributes. You've got a 6 in every Attribute and 10 points to spread around. You can't go higher than 12.
3: Choose a Role. There are five Roles, one for each attribute. Note the bonuses you get for each Role.
4: Spend Skill Points. There are 22 skills. You've got a 0 in every Skill and 10 points to spread around. First point raises a Skill to 3, each following point raises it by one. You can't go higher than 6. Remember to add any skills from your species or role.
5: Choose Traits. Some species have less traits available than others due to Racial traits, as depicted in Species. If you are Human, you get 3 Traits of choice. If you are a Beast you only get 1 Trait of choice. Other Species get their number of Traits. You can pick these Traits from the Generic Traits List or from some other Traits List open only to your Race or Role.
6: Choose Powers. Characters get two powers at character creation, one from their Basic Roles and one from whatever they want, except the Powers from Roles they do not have.
7. Choose Equipment. You get Equipment Points you can spend to determine your starting items. Most characters start with 5. These Points represent starting items that are often difficult, but not impossible, to acquire on your journey. Each EP you spend gets you a piece of equipment with a +1 bonus to a specific skill. You can spend 2 EP together to get a piece of equipment with a +2 bonus, or 3 EP together to get a piece of equipment with a +3 bonus. You can't spend 4 or 5 EP on the same piece of Equipment.
8: Choose Ideals. The average hero has three ideals. Choose well, these are how your character advances.
9: Choose Goals. The average starting character has three Goals. These goals are things your character should be ultimately working towards, but out of your character's reach at the beginning of the game.
You have 3 Will Points.
Your Speed is equal to your Robustness + your Agility.
That's it. Customize your character (name, appearance) and get ready to play!
Good luck and stay gold, hero boy.


Enemies[edit]

Every hero needs a nemesis. Every ragtag bunch of misfits needs an evil empire. In a world where the villains have won, there is no shortage of them. The enemies of the Player Characters are both the Kings and their evil minions. For the Game Masters out there, these rules should come in handy when you need to throw a living obstacle at your Players.


MOOKS

The most common type of enemy, Mooks are a dime a dozen: lacking the abilities and the sheer power of the Player Characters, they are forced to rely on their numbers. Luckily for them and unluckily for the good guys, numbers are something the Mooks are never lacking in.

The average, archetypal Mook has:

  • a 7 in every Attribute (before applying Species Modifiers);
  • a 3 in every Skill that most relates to his identity, plus a 5 in Prevent Harm and Endure;
  • only one Move per Turn;
  • no Will Points;
  • no Strikes he can soak before going down;
  • no Role;
  • no Traits, Powers, Ideals or Goals;
  • normal weapons, but usually no armors.

Since rolling Prevent Harm for each one of them could take a while and really slow down combat, the GM is encouraged to avoid rolling for it and just assume they got a 10. This makes their defense a stable 22. As rolling Initiative for each Mook would have the same issues as PH, the GM should say that they got a 10. This makes their Initiative a stable 17.

Not every Mook is equal to the other, of course: a big guy could have a 9 in ROBUSTNESS!, an excellent archer could have a 5 in Ranged, while Facilier’s and Alameda Slim’s enforcers have guns (which would be of +2 Ranged value). Depending on who they are working for, Mooks may also have all kinds of weird and mystical abilities. After all, the Fish Men that fill Ursula’s armies are better swimmers than the average soldier.


LACKEYS

The second most common type of enemy, Lackeys lead Mooks into battle and take care of important business. Higher than a Mook, but lower than an Inner Circle. Lacking the abilities and the sheer power of the Player Characters, but still armed with dark strength and dark minds, they rely on underhanded tactics and on sacrificing Mooks.

The average, archetypal Lackey has:

  • a 7 in every Attribute (before applying Species Modifiers);
  • a 4 in every Skill that most relates to his identity, plus a 5 in Prevent Harm and Endurance;
  • only one Move per Turn;
  • no Will Points;
  • 2 Strikes he can soak before going down;
  • no Role;
  • no Traits except Trying to Catch Me Fighting Dirty, which gives them +1 Initiative and a +3 to every attack and defense skill;
  • no Powers, Ideals or Goals;
  • normal equipment, which usually translates to normal weapons and armors.

Since rolling Prevent Harm for each one of them could take a while and really slow down combat, the GM is encouraged to avoid rolling for it and just assume they got a 10. This makes their defense a stable 25. As rolling Initiative for each Lackey would have the same issues as PH, the GM should say that they got a 10. This makes their Initiative a stable 18.

Not every Lackey is equal to the other, of course: a steady handed sniper could have a 10 in Agility, a ferocious brute could have a 6 in Brawl, and Frollo’s inquisitors have his Holy Fire to rely on. Depending on who they are working for, Mooks may also have all kinds of weird and mystical abilities. After all, the demons of Chernobog's legions aren't exactly what you would call common thugs.


INNER CIRCLE

By the time you get to this point, you'll really need to be making your own stat blocks. These are the small-town crooks; the corrupt sheriffs, gang leaders, mad wizards, and injun chiefs that will try to get in your way. They can even have a Role if you want to give your Players a more challenging experience.

Here's a suggested stat block:

  • Robustness: 8/12
  • Agility: 8/12
  • Intelligence: 8/12
  • Sensibility: 8/12
  • Charm: 10/12
  • Will: 2
  • Strikes: 2+1x, where x = the number of members in the party.
  • Skills: Skills: 6 in Skills directly related to their job. 5 in Prevent Harm, 5 in any offensive Skill, 5 in Endure, 5 in Occult, Academics, Mechanics, Travel, or Science. 4 in all other Skills.
  • Traits: Any two.
  • Powers: Any two; can be drawn from the Enemy Powers or from any Power List that fits their tier or Role. The GM may also opt to make special Powers for them.
  • Medium to high quality Equipment.

As with Mooks and Lackeys, Inner Circle enemies can have special qualities depending on who they work for. A corrupt soldier with a shotgun? That’s bad. A corrupt super soldier with a crystal laser beam shotgun? That’s really bad. Don’t be afraid to add some more Attribute points (no more than 4) to make him a real threat to a Zero-tier group.


VILLAINS

A serious threat. This person has likely been appointed by the King of their Land themselves, and should not be taken lightly. They should probably have a background and their own unique stat block by this point. Most will require a unique way to defeat them. Remember to give them a Role. Possibly two. If a character you recognize isn’t already a King, then they are likely a Villain working for one.

The default Villain stat block looks something like this:

  • Robustness: 9/14
  • Agility: 9/14
  • Intelligence: 9/14
  • Sensibility: 9/14
  • Charm: 12/14
  • Will: 3
  • Strikes: 3+2x, where x = the number of members in the party.
  • Skills: 7 in Skills related to their job. 6 in any offensive Skill, Prevent Harm, and Endure. 5 in all other Skills.
  • Traits: Any three, from any list. Powers: Any two, from any list and at least one from the Enemy List.

This an enemy type configured for early On-a-roll heroes. Add up to 10 attribute points to represent higher level On-a-roll enemies and Hero-tier enemies.


KINGS AND GODS

Each will have their own unique stat block. No two will be the same, and parties must often often employ specialized strategies to defeat them.


Kings' and Villains' stat blocks are featured on the Disney Villains Victorious Kings and Villains page and in the Google Drive.

What we still need done[edit]

We need:
Nothing. System is currently being reformatted and made into PDF version 1.0.

The King, The Land, The Rule[edit]

As seen in the Lion King, The King is the Land. If the King is noble, the Land prospers. If the King is malevolent, the Land decays. Each K/L/R entry is divided into three parts: the King, the Land and the Rule.

The King section gives a brief description of the King, and what they have become after being Victorious. Ursula is the King (Queen) of All Oceans. The stat blocks for each King are in the Kings & Villains section.

The Land section describes the basic geography of the land. It also describes monsters, animals, hazards and other dangers the players can run into. Ursula's current realm is the ocean. The players can run into storms, giant sea monsters, tidal waves, and so on. Basically, the Land describes the realm of the King and what it has become. Land Effects are elaborated upon in the Travelling and Dungeon Crawling rules.

The Rule section describes how the King gets things done. Whether he's openly destructive, controlling or corrupting. Ursula has no patience for subtlety now that she's holding the Trident, so she'll start throwing storms and monsters at the players as soon as they cross her borders.

Finally, a King’s influence is not the same everywhere. Ursula has a strong hold over the surface of the ocean, but beneath the surface lies creatures that would give even her pause. It is in these areas that submarines may pass with some degree of secrecy.

So the players can then decide which way they want to travel. Do they want to risk facing the full might of an angry King, or try going through a territory where they'll be hidden, but under constant threat from the elements?


K/L/Rs for the corebook can be found on the Disney Villains Victorious K/L/Rs page and in the Google Drive.

K/L/Rs for the Gridlocked expansion can be found on the Disney Villains Victorious: Gridlocked K/L/Rs page and in the Google Drive

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