Scrollhammer Rulebook

From 1d4chan

by Lolpwnt

This is the core Rulebook for Scrollhammer 1st Edition. It will become official as soon as it is edited and approved. Current army lists will need to be updated for it to be used. In the meantime, use the rules for the beta edition, which are found on the main Scrollhammer page on this wiki.

Contents

The Basics of Play[edit]

MEASURING DISTANCES[edit]

In games of Scrollhammer, distances are measured in inches (") with a tape measure or measuring stick. You can always check any distance at any time.

This allows you to check whether your units are in range of their target before they attack. After all, the soldiers are led by seasoned veterans who can accurately judge the range of their weapons) even if we, their generals, cannot.

Distances between models and all other objects (which can be other models, terrain features and so on) are always measured from closest point on one base to the closest point on the other base. Distances between units are always measured to and from the closest models in each of the units (see diagram below).

For example, if any part of a model's base is within 6" of the base of an enemy model, the two models are said to be within 6" of each other.

Sometimes the rules will call upon a unit to move directly towards another unit, or some other feature on the battlefield. Where this is the case, draw an imaginary line from the centre of the unit to its destination, and move the unit forwards along this line a number of inches equal to the distance stated.

DICE[edit]

Throughout a game, you will often need to roll dice to see how the actions of your models turn out - how effective their shooting attacks are, what damage they've done in close combat, and so on. Almost all the dice rolls in Scrollhammer use standard six-sided dice, also known as D6, but there are some exceptions as noted below.

Rolling a D3: In rare circumstances, you may be instructed to roll a D3. As there's no such thing as a three-sided die, You can use the following method to determine a result between 1 and 3. Roll a D6 and halve the number, rounding up. Thus, 1 or 2 = 1, 3 or 4 = 2 and 5 o r 6 = 3 .

Alternatively, you can roll a D3 to determine the result without having to calculate anything.

Scatter Dice: Scrollhammer uses a special die called a scatter dice (marked with arrows and a Hit! symbol). This die is mostly used to determine a random direction, most often applied when working out the behaviour of blast weapons, such as fireballs and field catapults(see page XX).

Dividing to Conquer: On occasion, you'll be called upon to divide the result of a dice roll, a characteristic or some other value. Where this happens, any fractions should always be rounded up. So a D6 roll of 3, halved, would be a result of 2 (1.5 rounded up). Similarly, 10% of a unit of twenty-one models, rounded up, would be 3 models.

Modifying Dice Rolls: Sometimes, you may have to modify the number rolled on the die (or the roll). This is noted as D6 plus or minus a number, such as D6+1. Roll the die and add or subtract the number given to or from the roll (as appropriate) to get the final result.

For example, D6+2 means roll a die and add 2 to the number on the dice for a total between 3 and 8. You may also be told to roll a number of dice in one go, which is written as 2D6, 3D6 and so on. Roll the indicated number of dice and add them together, so a 2D6 roll is two dice rolled and added together for a result of 2-12.

Another method is to multiply the score of a die by a certain amount, such as D6x5 to provide a result between 5 and 30.

Re-Rolls: In some situations, the rules allow you to pick up and re-roll dice. This is exactly what it sounds like - pick up the dice you wish to re-roll, and roll it again. The second roll counts, even if it means a worse result than the first, and no single die can be re-rolled more than once, regardless of the source of the re-roll.

If you re-roll a single 2D6 or 3D6 roll, you must re-roll all of the dice and not just some of them, unless the rule granting the reroll specifies otherwise. Note that any modifiers that applied to the first die roll are also applied to the re-roll.

Roll-Off If the rules require players to roll-off, this simply means that each player rolls a die and the player that rolls the highest result wins the roll-off. If the players roll the same result, both die must be re-rolled until one player is the winner - any modifiers that applied to the first die roll are also applied to any further rolls.

Randomising: Sometimes you'll be called upon to randomly select something - often a model, but sometimes an item, a spell, or similar. Where this is the case, simply assign a D6 result to each of the things the random selection must be made from, and roll a die to make your random choice. If you have fewer than six items to randomise between, simply roll again until you roll an assigned number.

Cocked Dice: Occasionally, a die will end up in a crevice in your terrain or in the crack between two sections of board and doesn't lie flat. We call this a 'cocked die'. Some players use a house rule that if any dice is not completely flat on the table, it must be re-rolled More common is for players to re-roll the dice only if they can't be sure of the result.

Of course, if your gaming surface is very textured and results in a lot of cocked dice (or simply if you prefer a tidy battlefield), you can make all your rolls in a tray or box lid

Dice on the Floor: It is generally accepted that if a die ends up on the floor, it doesn't count - so you don't need to shine a torch under the sofa to find out if you made your save or not. Most gamers agree that such dice can be rolled again. However, you can just as well house rule it that if your die misses the table, you have failed the roll - after all, if you can't hit a huge table with a tiny die, then what chance do your warriors have of hitting the enemy?

BLAST MARKERS AND TEMPLATES[edit]

Some weapons are so powerful that they don't just target a single model or unit, but have an area effect which might encompass (and often utterly devastate) several different units. To better represent these circumstances, Scrollhammer uses a series of three different blast markers and templates:

  • A 'small' blast marker (3" in diameter)
  • A 'large' blast marker (5" in diameter)
  • A 'template' (a tear-dropped shaped marker roughly 8" long)

The templates and blast markers are used as a way of determining how many models have been hit by an attack that has an area of effect or blast radius. When an attack uses a template, it will explain how the template is positioned, including any kind of scatter that might occur (scatter is discussed more completely next in this section). To work out the number of hits, you normally need to hold the template over an enemy unit or a particular point on the battlefield, and then look underneath (or through, if using a transparent template) to see how many models bases lie partially or completely underneath. A unit takes a hit for each model that is fully, or even partially, underneath the template.

Remember that a model's base is counted as being part of the model itself, so all a template has to do to cause a hit is to cover any part of its base.

Scatter: Sometimes a rule will call for an object (a template,counter, model or even a whole unit ) to be placed on the battlefield and then scatter.

When this occurs, follow this procedure:

1. Place the object on the battlefield as instructed by the rule

2. Roll a scatter dice and 2D6 to determine the direction and distance of scatter in inches.

3. If a Hit! is rolled on the scatter dice, the object does not move - leave it in place,and resolve the remainder of the rule.

4. If an arrow is rolled, move the object the distance shown on the 2D6 in the direction of the arrow. Ignore intervening terrain, units, etc., unless the rule states otherwise.

Once the object has scattered to its final position, resolve its effects.

Some rules may specify a distance to be determined other than 2D6 in which case you replace the 2D6 in this procedure with the method listed in the rule.

CHARACTERISTICS[edit]

A Scrollhammer model has numerical values of the following characteristics:

Weapon Skill(WS): How skilled or ferocious this model is in close combat. A model with WS0 cannot strike blows, and is hit automatically in close combat.

Ballistic Skill(BS): How accurate of a shot this model is at a range. A model with BS0 cannot fire any ranged weapon of any kind during the shooting phase, even one that does not require a roll to hit.

Strength(S): How physically strong this model is. A model with S0 is immediately slain as a casualty, his bones breaking beneath the weight of his own body.

Toughness(T): How hard to injure a model is. A model with T0 is immediately slain, his life force reduced to nothing.

Wounds(W): How many serious injuries a model can withstand. A model with 0 remaining wounds is immediately slain.

Initiative(I): How quick a model is. A unit where all models have I0 cannot pursue, and is always caught if pursued.

Attacks(A): How many attacks a model gets in close combat. A model with 0 attacks cannot strike blows in close combat. Attacks may be modified after the fact by certain bonuses; bonus attacks are not factored into the characteristic profile.

Leadership(Ld): The strength of a model's bravery and resolve.

Magicka(Mg): How many power dice are given to this model at the beginning of each of your turns.

Save(Sv): A quick reference to this model's armor save. Taking a different armor option may modify a model's saving throw.

No Characteristic may ever be higher than 10, except for Wounds and Magicka.

Characteristic Tests[edit]

A model will sometimes be called upon to take a characteristic test. Such a test can be applied against any characteristic that the model has, except for Leadership and Armour Save. A Toughness test is a characteristic test, as is a Strength test or an Initiative test, a Wounds test and so on. Models don't have a choice of which characteristic to use - the characteristic to be tested will be specified in the rule. To make a characteristic test use the following procedure:

1. Roll a D6 and compare the result to the relevant characteristic in the model's profile.

2. If the result is equal to or less than the number in the profile, the test is passed.

3. If the result is greater than the number in the model's profile, the test has been failed, and something will occur, as detailed in the rule that prompted the test.

4. When a single test is required for the whole unit, rather than for individual models, use the highest relevant characteristic in the unit.

Models with Multiple Profiles: Where a model has more than one value for the same characteristic, a characteristic test is always taken against the highest of the values.

Automatic Pass and Fail: When taking a characteristic test, a dice roll of 6 is always a failure, and a dice roll of 1 is always a success, regardless of any other modifiers. However, if the model has a characteristic of 0 or '-' it automatically fails the test.

Leadership Tests: At certain times, a model or unit might be called upon to take a Leadership test. This usually represents them drawing upon their courage to face disheartening circumstances. To take a Leadership test, use the following procedure:

1. Roll 2D6 and compare the result to the models leadership. 2. If the result is equal to or less than the model's Leadership value, then the test has been passed. 3. If the result is greater than the models Leadership value, a suitably dire consequence will occur, as detailed in the rule that called for the test. 4. If a unit includes models with different Leadership values, always use the highest Leadership from among them.

Models with Multiple Profiles: Where a model has more than one Leadership value, a Leadership test is always taken against the highest of the values.

Automatic Pass: A natural, unmodified, roll of 2 (a double 1 ) always passes a Leadership test, regardless of any modifiers that apply. A Leadership of 0 always fails a Leadership test.

Basic vs Advanced: Basic rules apply to all the models in the game, unless specifically stated otherwise. They include the rules for movement, shooting and close combat as well as the rules for morale, found between pages XX and XX. These are all the rules you'll need for your average Infantry model. Advanced rules apply to specific types of models, whether because they have a special kind of weapon (such as a crossbow), unusual skills (such as the ability to regenerate damaged flesh), because they are different to their fellows (such as a unit leader or a heroic character), or because they are not normal Infantry models (a man on horseback, a savage wolf, or even a Dragon). The advanced rules that apply to a unit are indicated in the entry for the unit in their relevant Scrollhammer Army Book. Where advanced rules apply to a specific model, they always override any contradicting basic rules.

On rare occasions, a conflict will arise between a rule in this rulebook, and one printed in an Army Book or Supplement. Where this occurs, the rule printed in the Army Book or Supplement always takes precedence.

THE SPIRIT OF THE GAME[edit]

Scrollhammer may be somewhat different to any other game you have played. Above all, it's important to remember to not be "That Guy." If a dispute arises over a rule, and no answer can be found, a quick way of resolving it can be by rolling a d6: on a 4+, you were right, on a 3 or less, your opponent was right. This way, the game can go on with minimal neckbeard rage.

Controlling Player vs Opposing Player: Sometimes, a rule will ask the controlling player to make an action or decision of some kind. At others, it will place the same responsibility on the opposing player. The controlling player is always the player who 'owns' the model in question - the one who has included it in his army. The opposing player is always his opponent.

Line of Sight: Line of Sight(often abbreviated as LOS) determines what a model can 'see'. Many situations call for you to determine whether or not a model has line of sight. A model normally needs line of sight whenever it wishes to attack an enemy, whether with enchanted sword, crossbow or magick. Line of sight literally represents your warriors' view of the enemy - they must be able to see their foes through, under or over the battlefield terrain and other models (whether friendly or enemy).

For one model to have line of sight to another, you must be able to trace a straight, unblocked line from its eyes to any part of the target's body (the head, torso, arms or legs).

Sometimes, all that will be visible of a model is a weapon, banner or other ornament he is carrying. In these cases, the model is not visible. Similarly, we ignore wings and tails, and antennae even though they are technically part of a model's body. These rules are intended to ensure that models don't get penalized for having impressive banners, weapons, and so on.

Naturally, you can't ask your models what they can see - they're plastic and resin, which is always a barrier to effective communication - therefore, you'll have to work it out on their behalf. In many cases, this will be obvious - if there's a hill, building or monster in the way, the enemy might be blatantly out of sight. In other cases, two units will be clearly in view of each other as there is nothing at all in the way. on those other occasions, where it's not entirely obvious whether or not one unit can see another, the player will have to stoop over the battlefield and look from behind the model's head for a 'model's eye view'. This means getting down to the level of your warriors and taking in the battlefield from their perspective to 'see what they can see'. You will find that you can spot lurking enemies through the windows of ruined buildings, catch a glimpse of a model's legs under tree branches and see that high vantage points become very useful for the increased line of sight that they offer.

Own Unit: There is one important exception to the rules for line of sight. Firing models can always draw line of sight through members of their own unit just as if they were not there.

The Turn[edit]

A Scrollhammer battle is a chaotic affair. To bring a modicum of order to the anarchy of battle, players alternate moving and fighting with their units. So, one player will move and fight with his forces, and then their opponent will move and fight. This process is then repeated, with the first player moving and fighting again, and so on, until the game is done.

During his turn, a player can usually move and fight once with each of his units. For convenience and flow of game play, we divide a player's turn into three main phases: Movement, Shooting and Close Combat.

This means that you move any models you want to first, then when you are finished all of your moving, you can shoot with your models. Finally, once your shooting is all completed, you can charge into close combat and resolve any close combats. This process helps to keep track of what is going on and makes it easier to know when one player's actions are over and your opponent can start his turn (and take his revenge).

Game and Player Turns: In a complete game turn, each player gets a player turn, divided into Movement, Shooting and Assault phases. One game turn therefore comprises two player turns - one for each player. Whenever a rule refers to 'a turn' it always means 'player turn' unless it specifically refers to a 'game turn'.

Exceptions: While playing Scrollhammer you’ll occasionally discover exceptions to the general turn sequence laid out here, when things are worked out as they occur rather than in any strict order. At other times, you'll find that both players will have to do something at the same time. When these things happen, the player whose turn it is decides the order in which the events occur. Occasionally, the actions of one player will trigger the sudden appearance of a particular unit, or may activate some special rule or occurrence. When this happens, the exceptional rule will contain all the information you need to resolve it.

THE MOVEMENT PHASE[edit]

In your turn, you can move any of your units - all of them if you wish - up to their maximum movement distance. Once a unit has completed all of its movement, you can select another unit and move that one, and so on, until you have moved all of the units you wish to move. Once you have started moving a unit, you must finish its move before you start to move another unit. Note that you don't have to move all (or any) of your units - indeed, there are several tactical advantages to remaining stationary, as we'll explain later in the rules. Once you've completed a unit's move, you cannot go back and change it, so think carefully before giving the order to advance.

Movement Distance: Models move up to 6" in the Movement phase. This represents most creatures advancing at a reasonable pace but stopping several times to scan the surrounding landscape for enemies, communicate with their commanders, and so on. Even warriors who are moving in a part of the battlefield where no enemies are apparent can only move 6". This is because your units lack your own omniscient knowledge that there are no enemies around. It is perfectly fine to measure a unit's move in one direction, and then change your mind and decide to move it somewhere else (even the opposite way entirely!) or decide not to move it at all. Models cannot, however, voluntarily move off the board.

Which Models are Moving: Whether or not a model moves can change how effective it will be in the shooting phase. You may decide that only some of the models in a unit are going to move this turn. If this is the case, declare which models are remaining stationary just before you start moving the other models of that unit. Remember that models must still maintain unit coherency.

Different Movement Distances within a Unit: Sometimes, a unit will contain models that move at different speeds. When this is the case, each model can move up to its maximum movement allowance so long as it remains in unit coherency (see below).

Models in the Way: A model cannot move within 1" of an enemy model unless they are charging into close combat in the close combat phase. To move past an enemy model, they must go around.

Moving and Close Combat: Units already locked in close combat with the enemy cannot move during the Movement phase.

Unit Coherency: When you are moving a unit, its individual models can each move up to their maximum movement distance. However, units have to stick together, otherwise individual models become scattered and the unit loses its cohesion as a fighting force. So, once a unit has finished moving, the models in it must form an imaginary chain where the distance between one model and the next is no more than a certain value, the unit's coherency value. A unit in such a pattern is "in coherency." The coherency value depends on the unit's Formation(see below).

During the course of a game, a unit can get broken up and lose unit coherency, usually because it has taken casualties from incoming enemy fire. If this happens, in their next Movement phase, the models in the unit must be moved in such a way that they restore unit coherency (or get as close as possible to having restored coherency). If the unit cannot move in its next turn, or is unable to restore unit coherency in a single turn, then the models must move to restore unit coherency as soon as they have the opportunity, including by Marching if they have that option (see page XX).

Moving Through Terrain[edit]

In addition to the rules presented in this section, certain types of terrain can affect how your models move. If a model can be at a point in a piece of terrain, but is unable to fit there, place it as close as possible once you've explained to your opponent where the model "actually" is.

Difficult Terrain: A difficult terrain check must be taken by a unit wishing to move through difficult terrain, such as tall boulders or thick woods. For each unit with models wishing to move through difficult terrain, roll a 2d6 and pick the highest value. That value is the furthest any model in the unit may move through difficult terrain during their move this phase.

Dangerous Terrain: Some terrain, such as peat bogs or lava pits, may carry with it unusual threats. A unit moving through Dangerous Terrain must take a Dangerous Terrain test. Roll a d6 for each model moving through the Dangerous Terrain. For each roll of a 1, immediately assign a wound to one of the models that moved through the dangerous terrain. No armor saves may be taken against this wound.

Unit Formations[edit]

A unit's Formation is the doctrine of war by which it fights on the battlefield. Each formation uses certain rules for movement in addition to those given above. A unit's formation also affects its actions in combat.

Fight In Ranks[edit]

A unit that Fights in Ranks advances across the battlefield in an orderly, tight formation.

A unit that Fights in Ranks must be in base contact with one another to be in Coherency. It has a front, sides, and rear. Each of these is a 90 degree arc. Models Fighting in Ranks may not change their position in the unit except when piling in or reforming, or in order to circumvent impassable terrain.

A unit that Fights in Ranks may move directly forward at full speed. It may wheel(move at an angle but resolve in the same direction it last faced) on its move. It may move directly backwards, or directly sideways, at half speed instead. If the models wish to change the direction that they are facing, pivot, or enter a new formation should models be out of coherency, it may do so, each unit moving the shortest distance possible to enter the new formation, or to accomplish such a maneuver. A unit that does this may not fire weapons or charge this turn. When a unit that Fights in Ranks rallies or consolidates from combat, it reforms with its rally or consolidation 3". A model that cannot reform moves as close as it can to doing so.

If a unit that Fights in Ranks would move through terrain, and certain pieces of terrain would block its movement, it may send its models around that terrain by the shortest possible route, and return them to their prior rank as soon as possible. They count, however, as being additional ranks and files should they be split up in this manner.

A unit that Fights in Ranks has the following special rules(see later chapters for further information):

Obvious Target: Units that Fight in Ranks can never get a cover save simply for being in area terrain, only for being actually obscured, or due to a special rule or effect.

Crowded Formation: Only the first two ranks of a unit that Fights in Ranks can shoot during the shooting phase. Should the unit fire backwards, or to the side, this would mean the first two ranks facing in the direction of those arcs, respectively.

Cohesive Fire: If one model that Fires in Ranks can see an enemy unit, and fires at that unit, the entire remainder of the unit may shoot at that unit where allowed, regardless of line of sight. The target gains a 3+ cover save against shots from models that cannot see them.

Stand and Shoot: When a unit that Fights in Ranks is charged and is not already locked in combat, if it decides to hold position, it may take a Leadership test. If it succeeds, every model in the unit may fire a non-spell shooting weapons that it has equipped against the charging unit at -1 to hit. Remove casualties from the charging unit before the charge is resolved. Such shots never prompt any morale tests.

Flanks: When a unit that Fights in Ranks is charged, the charging unit charges the arc that the majority of its models are in when the charge is declared. If a unit that Fights in Ranks is charged in a direction that it is not facing, it is flanked: it strikes at I1 against that enemy unit as long as it continues to not face that unit. If that unit is the only unit that it is locked in combat with, at the start of your movement phase, you may test Leadership for a flanked unit. If that roll is successful, each model in the flanked unit is turned to face the flanking unit. If so, models pile in along their ranks to be as close as possible to the flanking unit. After doing this, your unit is no longer considered flanked.

Strength in Ranks: A unit that Fights in Ranks, and is not being flanked, gains +1 to combat resolution for each full rank of 5 models, or +2 for each full rank of 10 models.

Horde[edit]

A Horde is a wild, unorganized, teeming mass of warriors.

A Horde must be within 1" of each other to be in coherency.

A Horde may move in any direction as its movement allows. It reforms and consolidates as normal(see page XX)

A unit with the Horde Formation has the following special rules(see later chapters for further information):

Scattered Target: Models in a Horde gain a 6+ cover save simply for being in area terrain.

Pressing Assault: A Horde gets +1 to combat resolution for every 12 models in the unit

Skirmish[edit]

Skirmishers are soldiers set apart from one another, focused more on individual tactics than on overpowering mass strength.

Skirmishers must be within 2" of each other to be in coherency.

Skirmishers may move in any direction as their movement allows. They reform and consolidate as normal(see page XX)

A unit with the Skirmish Formation has the following special rules(see later chapters for further information):

Concealed Target: Skirmishers gain a 4+ cover save simply for being in area terrain.

Agile Tactics: Skirmishers, even those without the Hit and Run special rule(see page XX), may attempt to Hit and Run against units that Fight in Ranks. They count as having -1 to their normal initiative when taking this test, unless they have the actual Hit and Run special rule.

THE SHOOTING PHASE[edit]

Equipped Items[edit]

A model may have a variety of equipment and spells. In order to show which items and spells are being used each turn, the equipping rule is used.

A model must have the same items or spells equipped in each hand over the course of the entire turn. The model's controller may choose what are equipped at any time; once the decision is made, that model uses those items or spells that turn. If a spell or item is used, or an ability requiring it to be equipped is invoked, then it must be chosen as equipped that turn, and any other equipped items or spells must also be declared at that moment. Conversely, if other items or spells have already been chosen as being equipped already, then that item or spell cannot be used(not even its passive abilities).

Each hand may hold a 1-handed item or spell each turn. A 2-handed item or spell requires both hands. Models with more than 2 hands can obviously use even larger items, or even more items! Weapons and spells that are equipped can be used, fired, and attacked with as normal. Of course, an equipped ranged weapon does not normally grant any bonus in close combat, and an equipped close combat weapon cannot normally fire at a range.

Equipping Spells:(see page XX for more rules on spells) A hand(or multiple hands) equipped with a spell can cast all available spells requiring that number of hands. Each spell does not have to be equipped separately; if a model can cast a 2-handed healing spell, it can also cast a pair of 1-handed flame blasts from its hands that same turn.

Staves: Magical staves are frequently used by wizards(see page XX) as a focus for their powers, or as a source of additional powers. If a spell is equipped in a hand, a single staff may be also equipped in that hand. A 2-handed staff, of course, requires two hands be equipped with spells(or both with a single spell) to use.

A shooting weapon, when equipped, fires the number of shots allowed it(see page XX) each time it has an opportunity to fire. If a spell is equipped, the model equipping it may fire any number of spell shooting weapons each time it has an opportunity to fire, as long as it has enough Power Dice.

Once each (player) turn ends, each model may switch to being equipped with other things. Items that do not require hands to use, such as armor and rings, are always automatically equipped.

The shooting process can be summarised in five steps, as described below. Each step is explained in greater detail later in this section. Once you've completed this shooting sequence with one of your units, select another and repeat the sequence.

Once you have completed steps 1 to 5 for each unit in your army that you wish to make a shooting attack, carry on to the Close Combat phase.

Nominate a Unit to Shoot[edit]

During the Shooting phase,a unit containing models equipped(see above) with ranged weapons can be nominated to make shooting attacks.

Who can Shoot?:

Certain situations prevent a model from firing. The most common are:

  • Their unit is locked in close combat with the foe.
  • Their unit is marching (see below).
  • Their unit is pinned down (see below).
  • Their weapon does not allow them to fire at this time.
  • Its unit has already fired this phase.
  • They have already decided not to use their ranged weapons this turn, in favor of something else (see "Equipped Items" above)

This is not a comprehensive list. Other game rules or special rules can sometimes affect a unit's ability to shoot - this is explained thoroughly when it occurs.

Choose a Target[edit]

Once you have chosen the unit that you want to shoot with, choose a target for them to shoot at. To do so, you must check the range and line of sight from your unit to the enemy unit you are targeting. Note that you may check the range and line of sight to multiple enemy units before deciding which one to shoot at and declaring it to your opponent.

Line of Sight: To target an enemy unit, at least one model must have line of sight (see page X) to at least one model in the target unit. If no models have line of sight, then a different target must be chosen.

Check Range: All weapons have a maximum range which is the furthest distance they can shoot. At least one weapon must be in range of the target unit. If no weapons are in range, then a different target must be chosen. When checking range, simply measure from each firer to the nearest visible model in the target unit. Any model that is found to be out of range of all visible enemy models in the target unit doesn't shoot - his shots would not be not accurate enough to hit anything.

Which Models can Fire?: Any model that is found to be in range of at least one visible enemy model in the target unit can fire. All models in the unit must shoot at the same target unit. If a model cannot shoot at the same target as the other models in its unit, for any reason, then it cannot shoot at all in that phase. A player can choose not to fire with certain models if he prefers (as some models may have One Use Only weapons, for example). This must be declared before rolling To Hit, as all of the models in the unit fire at the same time regardless of whether. or not all of the dice are rolled together.

Roll to Hit[edit]

To determine if the firing model has hit its target, roll a D6 for each shot that is in range. Most models only get to fire one shot, however, some weapons are capable of firing more than once as we'll explain in more detail later. The dice roll needed To Hit will depend on how accurate the firers are, as shown by their Ballistic Skill (or BS). (See the table below)

To Hit rolls are easy to remember if you just subtract the Ballistic Skill of the firing model from 7. This will give you the number you need; e.g. a model with BS 2 needs to roll a 5 or more (7-2=5).

Note that the minimum roll needed To Hit is always at least 2. When rolling To Hit, there is no such thing as an automatic hit. A roll of a 1 always misses (or, at the very least will need re-rolling - see below). If several weapons have different Strengths, special rules or AP values, use different coloured dice or roll them separately.

Heavy Weapons: Whether a model has moved or not can make a big difference to its ability to fire. Some weapons are so heavy, or take so long to load, aim or fire, that they can only be used effectively if their firer halts completely to brace himself or set up on the ground. This is explained in more detail in the Weapons section (pg XX). The most important thing to remember is that the effect movement has on shooting is applied on a model-by-model basis.

Ballistic Skill of 6 or better: Very rarely, a model may have a Ballistic Skill of 6 or even more If a model has BS 6 or higher, it gains a re-roll whenever it rolls a 1 To hit with ranged attacks. The second roll usually has a lower chance of hitting, and the number needed is given in the chart below in italics after the slash.

To Hit Chart
Ballistic Skill 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Roll Required 6+ 5+ 4+ 3+ 2+ 2+/6+ 2+/5+ 2+/4+ 2+/3+ 2+/2+


Rolls to Wound[edit]

Hitting your target is not always enough to put it out of action. The arrow might result in nothing more than a superficial graze or flesh wound.

To determine whether a hit causes a telling amount of damage, compare the weapon's Strength characteristic with the target's Toughness characteristic using the To Wound chart. The number indicated is the minimum result on a D6 needed to convert the hit into a wound. A value of '-' indicates that the target cannot be wounded by the Attack. Note that the minimum roll needed To 'Wound is always at least 2. When rolling To wound, there is no such thing as an automatic wound and a roll of a 1 always fails.

Each weapon has its own Strength value, which is given in its profile or in the description of the weapon. (Your Strength is on the left column, Enemy Toughness is on the top row)


To Wound Chart
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - - - -
2 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - - -
3 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - -
4 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - -
5 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - -
6 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ -
7 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+
8 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+
9 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+
10 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+

Remember to differentiated weapons with different rules that may have hit the enemy.

Multiple Toughness Values: Quite rarely, a unit will contain models with differing Toughness characteristics. When this occurs, roll To Wound using the Toughness characteristic that is in the majority in the target unit. If two or more Toughness values are tied for majority, use the highest of these tied values.

The Wound Pool: Finally, total up the number of wounds you have caused. Keep the dice that have scored Wounds and create a 'pool', where each dice represents a wound. If there are wounds with different Strengths, AP values or special rules, keep them separated into groups of wounds in the pool. If all the wounds are the same, the wound pool will consist of only one group.

Allocating Wounds and Removing Casualties[edit]

To determine how many casualties are caused, you will need to allocate the wounds caused and resolve any saving throws the target is allowed.

Allocate Wounds: Your opponent must choose which models in his unit the wounds will be allocated to. He must assign wounds to each model, until a wound has been assigned to every model in the unit, before additional wounds are assigned. He must then proceed to assign the additional wounds, one per model, until one has been assigned to every model, and so on and so forth. Remember when allocating wounds to differentiate wounds from weapons with different rules.

Take Saving Throws: The target unit gets to make one saving throw, if it has one (see below), for each wound being resolved. Make a note of how many unsaved wounds have been caused. Saves are taken for each model in the unit, individually. Whenever any number of models share the exact same profile and rules, roll for the saves of all those models at once.

Assign Unsaved Wounds: Unsaved wounds are assigned to models, or groups of models with the same profile, one for each failed saving throw. The opponent who failed the saves chooses the order in which the wounds are assigned. In the case of multi-wound models that are not characters, if wounds are assigned to such a model, wounds from other non-character models with the same number of starting wounds in the unit must continue to be assigned to such a model in manner where as many models are slain as possible(continuing until all unsaved wounds have been assigned). This must be done even if the profiles of those models differ. Those wounds thus stacked on one model count as being resolved then and there.

The wound pool is empty when there are no wounds left to roll for, save or put on models, or there are no models left in the unit.

Emptied Wound Pool: When the Wound pool is empty, the shooting attack has been completely resolved. You can begin your next shooting attack, or proceed to the Assault phase.

Out of Range:

As long as a model was in range of the enemy when To Hit rolls were made, he is considered to be in range for the duration of the Shooting attack, even if the removal of casualties means that the closest model now lies out of range.

Instant Death:

Even though a creature might be able to withstand multiple grievous wounds, there are plenty of weapons and powers across Tamriel that are powerful enough to destroy it instantly and utterly. If a model suffers an unsaved Wound from an Attack that has a Strength value of double its Toughness value or greater (after modifiers), it is reduced to 0 Wounds and slain.

Types of Saving Throws[edit]

Few warriors take to the battlefield without some form of protection, whether it is a suit of armour or a magical talisman. Furthermore, the battlefield itself can also offer protection. All these forms of protection are represented by saving throws (sometimes called saves), as we'll now discuss.

Armour Saves:

Most troops wear some sort of protective clothing or armour, even if it's only a helm! Some creatures may have a form of natural protection, such as a chitinous exoskeletons or thick bony plates. If a model has an Armour Save characteristic of 6+, it is allowed a further dice roll, to see if the armour prevents the wound. This is called an armour saving throw, or armour save, for short.

To take an armour save, roll a D6 and compare the results to the Armour Save characteristic of the model that has been allocated the wound.

  • If the dice result is equal to or higher than the model's Armour Save characteristic, the wound is stopped.
  • If the result is lower than the Armour Save value, the armour fails to protect its wearer and it suffers a wound.

This means that, unlike other characteristics, an Armour Save is better if it is a lower number.

Armor Piercing Weapons:

Some powerful weapons are quite capable of tearing through or shattering even the thickest armour. This is shown by a weapon having an Armour Piercing characteristic, usually referred to as AP.

Many weapons have an Armour Piercing value. A weapon's AP rating is subtracted from the armor saving throw of an enemy that it wounds. A weapon shown as 'AP 0', or without a stated AP, has no Armour Piercing value and will never lower a target's Armour Save.

Example: A weapon of AP2 hits a warrior with a 3+ armor save. He may make an armor save, but he must make the save on a 5+.

If a multiple AP values are granted to a single attack from different sources, they stack.

Ward Saves:

Some warriors are protected by more than mere physical armour. They may be shielded by divine blessings, enveloped in mystical energies or have a metabolism that can shrug off hits that would slay a giant. Models with wargear or abilities like these are allowed a ward saving throw.

Ward saves are different to armour saves because they may always be taken at full effectiveness whenever the model suffers a Wound - the Armour Piercing value of attacking weapon has no effect. Even if a wound ignores all armour saves, an ward saving throw can still be taken.

Cover Saves:

Often, you'll find enemy models are partially hidden or obscured by terrain, also known as being in cover. Cover shields soldiers against flying arrows and fiery blasts, enabling them to get their heads down or crawl amongst the boulders and (hopefully) avoid harm. Where this is the case, the model will be entitled to a cover save. Cover saving throws are not affected by the AP value of an attacking weapon, so units in cover get a specific saving throw regardless of what's firing at them. Cover saves only apply against shooting attacks, unless stated otherwise in a special rule.

Determining Cover Saves:

A model is considered to be "obscured" if at least 50% of it is out of sight of at least 50% of the firing models. If at least 50% of the models in a unit are obscured from the firing unit, that unit will get a cover save.

Types of Cover Saves:

The type of cover save a model receives depends on exactly what he is sheltering behind. For example, a soft obstacle (like tall grass) that would hide soldiers behind it, but would not slow an arrow, confers a 5+ cover save. Purpose-built fortifications, such as castle ramparts, confer a 3+ cover save, and most other things confer a 4+ cover save. Before deploying their armies, it is a very good idea for players to go through all the terrain pieces on the battlefield quickly and agree what kind of cover each will offer.

In most cases, terrain will offer a 4+ Cover save.

Go to Ground:

If warriors find shots raining down on them, they may decide to keep their heads down to try to stay alive a little longer while they wait for reinforcements. After the enemy has rolled To Hit and To Wound against any of your units, but before any saves are made for wounds allocated, you can declare that the unit is Going to Ground. To represent this, place a suitable marker next to the unit as a reminder.

  • Models in a unit that has gone to ground immediately receive +1 to their cover saving throws.
  • Models that are not currently in a position that would give them a cover save can still Go to Ground by diving into the mud (or some other evasion technique) and receive a 6+ cover save.

A unit that has gone to ground cannot move, shoot, march or charge. At the end of its following turn, the unit returns to normal, the marker is removed and the unit is free to act as normal from then on.

Whilst it has gone to ground, a unit reacts normally if affected by enemy actions (for example, it takes Morale checks as normal). If the unit is forced to move, for example they have to Fall Back, it returns to normal immediately - remove the marker. If assaulted, the unit will fight as usual, but because they are not set to receive the enemy charge, the unit cannot Stand and Shoot or Counter-Attack if it is able to do so.

Intervening Models:

If a target is partially hidden from the firer's view by models from a third unit models not from the firer's unit, or from the target unit, it receives a 4+ cover save in the same way as if it was behind terrain. Similarly, if a model fires through the gaps between models in an intervening unit, the target is in cover, even if it is completely visible to the firer.

Note that this does not apply if the shots go over the unit rather than through it.

This does not mean that intervening models literally stop the shots, but rather that they obscure the target and spoil the firer's aim. A successful cover save in this case might mean that the firer has not shot at all, missing the fleeting moment when his eye was trained on the target. This is because, in the case of intervening friends, the firer would be afraid of hitting his comrades, while in the case of intervening enemies, the firer is distracted by the more immediate threat.

Scenic rocks and other decorative elements that players might have placed on the bases of their models are always ignored from the point of view of determining cover. You cannot take your cover with you!

Note the exception that, in the same way as they can trace line of sight through members of their own unit, models can always shoot through members of their own unit without conferring or receiving a cover save.

Models with More than one Save: Sometimes, a model will have a normal armour save and a separate ward save. As if this wasn't enough, the model might be in cover as well. In these cases,a model only ever gets to make one saving throw, but it may choose which one it makes. If a model can benefit from different types of cover, for example, being behind tall grass (5+ cover save) and a barricade (4+), the model uses the best cover save available (in this case 4+).

Maximum Save: Some models may have a save of 1+ or better, especially after potentially recieving benefits from certain abilities. However, no saving throw (armour, cover or invulnerable) will ever succeed on a roll of 1. Regardless of what is giving the model its save, a roll of 1 always fails.

Marching[edit]

At times, warriors may choose to move at the double, pressing forwards even in the face of death. In their Shooting phase, units may choose to make a March move instead of firing. An Infantry unit may makes its March move up to 3". This move follows the normal rules for coherency, and the unit's normal rules for movement style. Units that Fight in Ranks must always march straight forward.

Difficult terrain tests must still be taken, but rolling 2d3 and picking the highest. Models marching through dangerous terrain must test as normal (see page XX). Units that March in the Shooting phase cannot charge in the following Close Combat phase.

If a unit attempts to March while within 9" of an enemy unit, it must pass a Leadership test to do so.

THE CLOSE COMBAT PHASE[edit]

Each player's close combat phase consists of several sub-phases, to be resolved in a specific order.

Charge Sub-phase[edit]

It's time for your warriors to hurl themselves into close combat and carry the day through bitter melee. To resolve a charge, use the following procedure:

Declare a Charge:

Choose a unit in your army that is declaring a charge and nominate the enemy unit(s) it is attempting to charge. A unit can never declare a charge against a unit that it cannot reach, nor can it declare a charge against a unit that it cannot see. This means that a charge can usually only be declared on a unit up to 12" away (the maximum charge range for most models, as we'll discover later). Some units are disallowed from charging. Common reasons a unit is not allowed to declare a charge include:

  • The unit is already locked in close combat (see page XX).
  • The unit marched this turn (see page XX).
  • The unit has gone to ground (see page XX).
  • The unit fired a weapon or used an ability that cannot be used the turn it charges(see page XX)
  • The unit is falling back (see page XX).

The target enemy unit, if it is not already locked in combat or falling back, must choose its charge reaction. It may choose to either to flee or to hold. If it chooses to flee, it immediately falls back d6". It may still be charged. If it chooses to hold, it absorbs the charge, and may take a Leadership test to Stand and Shoot if it has the Fight in Ranks formation(see page XX).

In addition to the above, a unit that fired in the shooting phase can only charge the unit that it targeted its shots at during that turn's Shooting phase.

Rolling for Charge Range:

Roll 2D6. This is your charge range - the number of inches your assaulting unit can charge. This total is important, so remember it. If a unit has models that roll differently for their charge range, the whole unit must charge at the speed of the slowest model.

Charge Move:

The charging unit now moves into close combat with the unit(s) it has declared a charge against - this is called a charge move.

Moving Charging Models:

Charging units must attempt to engage as many opposing models in the enemy unit as possible with as many of their models as possible - no holding back or trying to avoid terrain!

All of the models in a charging unit make their charge move - up to the 2D6 distance you rolled earlier - following the same rules as in the Movement phase, with the exception that they can be moved within 1" of enemy models. Charging models still cannot move through friendly or enemy models, cannot pass through gaps narrower than their base, and cannot move into base contact with enemy models from a unit they are not charging.

If the charging unit can make the charge, move it on the fastest possible route, wheeling or pivoting if necessary(if it has Fight in Ranks), into base contact with the enemy unit. Each model should attempt to get into base contact with an enemy model, 1 for 1. If a model's base is larger than an enemy model's, it should attempt 2 for 1, 3 for 1, or however much larger is necessary.

With units that Fight in Ranks, the models should go as far as they can to get as many of the enemy's front rank in base contact with theirs as possible. Charges against ranks are always against the 90 degree arc of that unit that the majority of the charging unit is inside of. Excess ranks stand out on the side closer to the side from which the charge came, or on both sides if no wheel or pivot greater than the width of any charging model's base was required to make the charge. Units hanging out over on the edges never wrap around ranks. Charging models in ranks stay in their ranks.

With skirmishers and hordes, an initial charger is chosen, the closest model to the enemy, who engages the closest model along the fastest possible route, within the arc of the enemy's ranks(if applicable) that is being charged. After moving the first model in the unit, you can move the others in any sequence you desire, providing you abide by the following conditions, moving along the shortest possible route:

  • A charging model must end its charge move in unit coherency with another model in its own unit that has already moved
  • If possible, a charging model must move into base contact with an enemy model within reach(and arc, if applicable) that is not already in base contact with another charging model.
  • If there are no such enemy models in reach, the model must begin to form a rank behind or to the side of a friendly model in reach that is in base contact.
  • If a charging model cannot reach any enemy or friendly models, it must simply stay in coherency. If you follow this sequence, you will end up with all the models in the charging unit in unit coherency, having engaged as many enemy models as possible with as many charging models as possible.

Multiple Charges:

If a unit attempts to charge multiple units, it must roll enough distance to reach those units in order to successfully charge. Once the charge is resolved, however, if no models actually reach one of those units due to the charge rules, the unit that was not charged does not fight in that combat unless it was already in it, and is not locked in combat, unless it would have been already.

Charging Through Difficult Terrain:

If, when charging, one or more models have to move through difficult terrain, the unit must make a Difficult Terrain test (see page XX). However, to represent the uneven pace of a charge, the unit rolls 3D6, rather than 2D6, and uses the two lowest results as its charge range. Warriors who charge through difficult terrain may be easily ambushed. To represent this, if one or more models charge a unit with the Skirmish formation through difficult terrain, that unit may attempt to Counter-Attack(see page XX).

Remember that charging models must engage as many enemies in the target unit as possible.

Charging through Dangerous Terrain:

If, when charging any model in a charging unit goes through dangerous terrain, that model must immediately take a Dangerous Terrain test (see page XX).

Failed Charge:

If the initial charger(or the entire unit, in the case of a unit with Fight in Ranks) is found to be further than its charge range from the unit(s) that it has declared the charge against, the charge fails and no models are moved.

Declare Next Charge:

Once all the models in a charging unit have moved, the player can choose another unit(that has not yet declared a charge) and declare another charge if he wishes.

Ending the Charge Sub-Phase:

Once you have launched all of the charges you wish to, the Charge sub-phase is ended. Move on to the Fight sub-phase.

Fighting Sub-phase[edit]

With all the charges carried out, it's time to strike blows! How effective creatures are in close combat depends almost entirely on their physical characteristics - how fast, strong, tough and ferocious they are. In close combat, armour remains useful for warding off your enemies' attacks, but ranged weapons become a secondary consideration - the best bow in the land won't save you if your opponent is bashing your brains out with a rock!

Choose a Combat:

There may be several separate melees being fought at the same time in different parts of the battlefield. If this is the case, the player whose turn it is chooses the order to resolve the combats, completing each combat before moving on to the next one, and so on until all combats are resolved.

Fight Close Combat:

In close combat, both players' models fight. Attacks in close combat work like shots in shooting - each Attack that hits has a chance to wound. The wounded model gets a chance to save, and if it fails, is (generally) removed as a casualty. How many blows are struck and who strikes first is detailed later.

Initiative Steps:

In close combat, slow, lumbering opponents can often be dispatched quickly by faster and more agile foes. However, many ponderous opponents are tough enough to withstand a vicious pummelling and keep coming back for more. To represent this, a model's Initiative determines when he attacks in close combat. Work your way through the Initiative values of the models engaged in the combat, starting with the highest and ending with the lowest. This means that each combat will have ten Initiative steps, starting at Initiative 10 and working down to Initiative 1. You'll rarely have models fighting at all of the Initiative steps, so just skip any that don't apply.

Start of Initiative Step Pile-In:

At the start of each Initiative step, any model whose Initiative is equal to the value of the current Initiative step, that isn't already as close to the front of its rank as possible(or in the case of Skirmish and Horde models, as close as possible to being in base contact with the enemy or with a friendly model that is in base contact with the enemy), must make a Pile In move. A Pile In move is a 3" move that is performed in the following order:

  • First, any models Pile In if this will bring them to the front of their rank.
  • Second, any models in Skirmish or Horde formation Pile In if this will bring them to base contact with an unengaged enemy
  • Third, any models in Skirmish or Horde formation Pile In if this will bring them into base contact with a friendly model in base contact with an enemy
  • Any ranks that are missing in the center of a unit that Fights in Rank, so as to put them out of coherency, are filled by moving the least number of models to do so, along the shortest possible route, to fill in the missing ranks until the unit is in coherency.
  • Any remaining models in Skirmish or Horde formation that are not in base contact with one or more enemy or friendly models and have yet to Pile In must now do so, and must attempt to get as close as possible to the combat, while remaining in coherency

These moves follow the same rules as moving charging models, except that they are not slowed by difficult terrain (though it may still trigger Dangerous Terrain tests). Also, a Pile In move cannot be used to contact units that are not already involved in the assault.

When making Pile In moves, the player whose turn it is moves his unit(s) first. If both players' Pile In moves combined would be insufficient to bring any combatants back together (that's more than 6" - very unlikely!), the assault comes to an end. All remaining Initiative steps are lost - work out the assault result as described on page XX.

Who can Fight?:

Units that have one or more models in base contact with enemies are locked in combat. While a unit is locked in combat, it may only make Pile In moves and cannot otherwise move or shoot. At the start of each Initiative step, you must work out whether or not a model locked in combat is also engaged, as described below.

A model is engaged in combat, and must fight if:

  • The model was in base contact with one or more enemy models at the start of the Fighting Sub-Phase.
  • The model was in base contact with a friendly model in base contact with one or more enemy models in the same combat at the start of the Fighting Sub-Phase.
  • At the start of its initiative step, after piling in, the model became in base contact with one or more enemy models, or in base contact with one or more friendly models in base contact with the enemy.

Models make their attacks when their Initiative step is reached, assuming they haven't already been killed by a model with a higher Initiative! If both sides have models with the same Initiative, their attacks are made simultaneously.

Note that certain situations, abilities and weapons can modify a model's Initiative. If a model makes two separate groups of attacks during different Initiative steps, he only piles in during the first, unless he is not engaged in combat during the second.

Unengaged Models:

Unengaged models cannot attack in close combat - they're too far from the crush of battle.

Number of Attacks:

When their Initiative step is reached, models with that Initiative who are still alive and able to attack, must attack.

Each engaged model makes a number of Attacks (A) as indicated on its characteristics profile, plus the following bonus Attacks:

  • +1 Charge Bonus: Engaged models that charged or counter-attacked this turn get + 1 Attack this turn.
  • +1 Dual Wielding: Engaged models equipped with two melee weapons of the same base type(Hand Weapons, Spears etc.) get + 1 Attack. Models with more than two weapons gain no additional benefit; you only get one extra Attack, even if you have four arms and a sword in each.
  • Other bonuses: Models may have other special rules and wargear that confer extra Attacks.

Which Weapons can be Used?:

A model may use any weapons equipped(see page XX) in its hands in close combat. If the weapon is a ranged weapon, or does not grant any sort of special bonus to close combat, that weapon grants no bonus in close combat. If attacked with, it counts as attacking with a single, generic close combat weapon(never gaining the bonus for wielding two or more weapons). If multiple close combat weapons with different profiles are equipped, the model may split his attacks between them as he sees fit, or make all his attacks with one or the other, while still gaining the bonus for multiple weapons. A staff counts as a spell, not a close combat weapon, unless stated otherwise.

Rolling to Hit:

To determine whether hits are scored, roll a D6 for each Attack a model gets to make and compare the WS of the attacking model with the WS of the target unit. Remember to differentiate between weapons and models with different profiles when necessary.

Then, consult the To Hit chart on this page to find the minimum result needed on a D6 To Hit. (Your Weaponskill is on the left column, Enemy Weaponskill is on the top row)


To Hit Chart
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 4+ 4+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+
2 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+
3 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+
4 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 5+ 5+
5 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+
6 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+
7 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+
8 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+ 4+
9 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+ 4+
10 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 4+


Units with Different Weapon Skills:

A few units contain models with different Weapon Skills. Whilst each model in such a unit rolls To Hit using its own Weapon Skill, Attacks made against such a unit are resolved using the Weapon Skill of the majority of the engaged enemy models. If two or more Weapon Skill values are tied for majority, use the highest of those tied values.

Rolling to Wound:

Not all of the Attacks that hit will harm the enemy - they may merely graze or inflict a flesh wound. As with shooting, once you have scored a hit with an Attack, you must roll a D6 for each successful hit to see if you cause a wound and damage your foe. Consult the chart below, cross-referencing the attacker's Strength(on the left) characteristic with the defender's Toughness(top). The chart indicates the minimum result on a D6 roll required to inflict a wound, and is just like the one in the Shooting phase section. A'-' indicates that the target cannot be Wounded by the Attack. In most cases,when rolling To Wound in close combat, you use the Strength on the attacker's profile regardless of what weapon he is using. There are some Melee weapons that give the attacker a Strength bonus, and this is explained later in the Weapons section (see page XX).

To Wound Chart
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
1 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - - - -
2 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - - -
3 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - - -
4 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - - -
5 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ - -
6 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+ -
7 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+ 6+
8 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+ 6+
9 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+ 5+
10 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 3+ 4+

Remember to use different coloured dice or otherwise distinguish between the Wounds that have different special rules attached to them (like those inflicting Instant Death or those that reduce Armour Saves), as you would do in the Shooting phase.

Multiple Toughness Values:

Quite rarely, a unit will contain models that have different Toughness characteristics. When this occurs, roll To Wound using the Toughness value of the majority of the engaged foe.

If two or more Toughness values are tied for majority, use the highest of those tied values.

Allocating Wounds:

After determining the number of wounds inflicted against a unit at a particular Initiative step, wounds are allocated, saves taken and casualties removed. Wounds are allocated and resolved just like in the Shooting phase. Saves may still be taken.

Cover Saves:

Models do not get cover saves against any Wounds suffered from close combat attacks, unless allowed to by a special rule, and for obvious reasons, cannot Go to Ground - there's nowhere to hide!

Armour Saving Throws:

Models can take armour saves to prevent Wounds caused in close combat - provided that their armour is good enough, of course! As in the Shooting phase, if the Wound is caused by a weapon with an AP, subtract the AP from the armor save score (see page XX).

Ward Saves:

An invulnerable save can chosen to be made instead of the armor save if it is available, as normal. It can even be made if a model is not permitted to take an armour save (because the AP of the Attack negates it or the rules for a weapon or Attack states that no armour save is allowed).

Dead Before Striking:

If a model becomes a casualty before its Initiative step, it cannot strike back. When striking blows simultaneously, you may find it more convenient to resolve one side's Attacks and simply turn the dead models around to remind you that they have yet to attack back.

Note on Saving Throws:

A model must make a Saving Throw if one is available; the controlling player chooses which one to use. And a Saving Throw which is reduced to automatic failure by an effect cannot be taken; another must be taken instead if such a save is available.

Weapons that Cause Additional Effects to models Hit or Wounded:

Some weapons and special rules cause additional effects to models they hit or wound.

  • If a weapon causes an effect on inflicting an unsaved wound, resolve that effect after saves are taken on the wounded model.
  • If the weapon causes an effect on wounding, regardless if it is saved or not, its effect is resolved on each unit that it rolled a wound on. After saves are taken, when wounds are allocated, the allocating player must, begin to mark a number of models(up to the amount of saved wounds from the weapon) as having the additional effect of the weapon inflicted upon them. Only models that could have been wounded by the weapon this round may be nominated.
  • If the weapon causes an effect on hitting, regardless of whether it wounds or not, its effect is resolved on each unit that it inflicted an unsaved wound on. After saves are taken, when wounds are allocated, the controlling player must, begin to mark a number of models(up to the amount of hits from the weapon that did not wound) as having the additional effect of the weapon inflicted upon them. Only models that could have been hit by the weapon this round may be nominated.

Fight Next Initiative Step:

Fight the next Initiative step as previously described until all of the Initiative steps have been completed (remember to skip Initiative steps which have no models in them).

Determine Combat Results:

Melees are usually decisive; one side or the other quickly gains the upper hand and forces their foe back. Good leadership can keep a side in the fight, but the casualties that each side inflicts are usually the most telling factor.

To decide who has won the combat, factor in the following:

  • Total up the number of unsaved Wounds inflicted by each side onto their opponents. This includes all Wounds caused during the Fight sub-phase, whether from conventional Attacks or from other effects.
  • Add rank bonuses for models that Fight in Ranks(if applicable), and number bonuses for Hordes(if applicable)
  • Add 1 to the score of a side that has a Standard Bearer(see page XX)

The side with the highest total is the winner. The losing unit must make a Morale check and Falls Back if it fails (see page XX). If both sides suffer the same score, the combat is drawn and continues next turn. Of course, if one side destroys the enemy completely, it wins automatically, even if it sustained more casualties!

Note that wounds that have been negated by saving throws or special rules do not count towards determining who won the combat. Neither do wounds in excess of a model's wounds characteristic; only the Wounds actually suffered by enemy models count (including all of the Wounds lost by models that have suffered Instant Death - see page XX).

In rare cases, certain models can cause wounds on themselves or their friends - obviously, these wounds are added to the other side's total for working out who has won.

Check Morale:

Units that lose a close combat must make a Morale check to hold their ground, with a penalty depending on how severe the defeat was (see page XX). Subtract the difference between the scores of the combat, the amount the losing side lost by, from the score.

  • If they pass, the unit fights on - the combat is effectively drawn and no further account is made of the unit's defeat.
  • If the unit fails, they abandon the fight and Fall Back. Morale checks and falling back are covered in the Morale section on page XX.

Our Weapons Are Useless:

If a unit is locked in combat with an enemy it cannot hurt, it can choose to automatically fail its Morale check for losing a combat. This can be a risky tactic, but sometimes worthwhile.

Sweeping Advances:

When a unit falls back from combat, the victors make a Sweeping Advance, attempting to cut down their fleeing foes.

When a Sweeping Advance is performed, both the unit falling back and the winning unit roll a D6 and add their unmodified Initiative to the result. In a unit with mixed Initiative characteristics, use the highest - we can assume the quicker-witted individuals in the unit guide the others.

The units then compare their totals.

  • If the winner's total (Initiative + dice roll) is equal to or greater than the foe's, the falling back unit is caught by the Sweeping Advance: If the winner’s Initiative test result beats that of the foe’s, the foe is destroyed! Every model in the unit is immediately removed as a casualty: they have been overrun, or else have surrendered and have been taken prisoner.
  • If the falling back unit's total is higher, they break off from the combat successfully.

In either case, make a Fall Back move for the surivivng members of the losing unit (see page XX). The winners can then Consolidate as detailed below.

Disallowed Sweeping Advances:

If a victorious unit is still locked in combat with other units that are not falling back, it does not get a chance to execute a Sweeping Advance and the retreating enemy automatically makes their Fall Back move safely. Some troops, as detailed in their special rules, are not permitted to make Sweeping Advances - when a victorious unit contains one or more models that are not allowed to make a Sweeping Advance, the enemy always manage to disengage safely - there is no need to roll.

End of Combat Pile-In:

After the combat has been resolved, it can happen that some models from units that did not Fall Back are not in combat, or are out of coherency. These models must make a Pile In move, starting with the side whose turn it is. This is treated exactly like a start of Initiative step Pile In, as mentioned below.

Consolidation:

At the end of a combat, if a unit's opponents are all either destroyed or falling back, or at the end of combat Pile In was insufficient, so that the units are no longer locked in combat with each other, they may Consolidate. Consolidating models move up to 3" in any direction, as the sudden victory may leave the warriors raring to storm onwards or flat-footed and dumbfounded, according to the vagaries of fate.

Units making a Consolidation move are not slowed by difficult terrain but do trigger Dangerous Terrain tests where appropriate. A Consolidation move may not be used to move into base contact with enemy models, as this can only be done with a charge move. Consolidating models must therefore stop 1" away from all enemy models, including any that might have just fallen back from the combat that the consolidating unit has fought in.

Units that Fight In Ranks always Reform instead of performing a normal Consolidation move.

Multiple Combats:

Combats that involve more than two units are called multiple combats (see the diagram on page XX for an example).

Fight Sub-Phase:

Resolving the Fight sub-phase of a multiple combat is done just as it is for a combat between two units except for the following clarifications and adjustments:

Directing Attacks:

In multiple combats, during a model's Initiative step, the following extra rules apply:

  • A model that is in base contact, or engaged, with just one enemy unit when it comes to strike must attack that unit.
  • A model that is in base contact, or engaged, with more than one enemy unit when it strikes blows, can split its Attacks freely between those units. Declare how each model is splitting its Attacks immediately before rolling To Hit.

Combat Results

When determining assault results in a multiple combat, total up the number of wounds inflicted by all units on each side to see which side is the winner. Every unit on the losing side has to check their Morale (they all use the same penalty, as described in the Morale section on page XX).

After all of the losing units have taken their Morale checks, each winning unit that is now free to make a Sweeping Advance rolls the dice and compares its total with the total of each of the falling back enemy units it was engaged with. Any that it equals or beats are destroyed. Remember that winning units can only Sweeping Advance if all of the units they were locked in combat with Fall Back or are wiped out in the fight.

After determining assault results, all units that were involved in that multiple combat must make Pile In moves towards enemies that fought in that combat. If no models in a unit are in base contact with an enemy unit, and the combined Pile In moves of both sides are not enough for them to get back into base contact, then they can Consolidate instead.

Locked in Close Combat:

Models belonging to units locked in combat cannot fire weapons in the Shooting phase, they are too busy fighting the enemy in front of them. Nor can they move during the movement phase, or march. Units that are locked in close combat do not take Morale checks or Pinning tests caused by shooting and cannot Go to Ground; they are much too focused on the fighting!

MORALE[edit]

Your units have to check to see if their morale holds under certain circumstances. As you will have already gathered, particular events will require your units to take Morale checks, and a unit in particularly dire straits may be forced to take several in a single turn.

Morale Checks:

Morale represents the grit, determination, or (sometimes) plain stupidity of warriors in action. Morale checks are a specific kind of Leadership test.

Like all other Leadership-based tests, Morale checks (also sometimes called Morale tests) are taken by rolling 2D6 and comparing the total to the unit's Leadership value.

  • If the result is equal to or less than the unit's Leadership value, the test is passed and the unit does not suffer any ill effects - their nerve has held.
  • If the result is higher than their Leadership, the test is failed and the unit will immediately be Pinned Down or Fall Back, as described later.

Some units have special rules pertaining to Morale checks that are detailed in their Army Book. For example, some particularly fanatical units might be immune to the effects of morale. Some units always pass Morale checks, while a few others always pass all leadership tests. This is a subtle but important difference. For example, units that always pass Morale checks will still have to test to use Shouts(see page XX).

Morale Check Modifiers:

Certain circumstances can make Morale checks harder for a unit to pass. This is represented by applying leadership modifiers to Morale checks, which can modify the unit's Leadership value by -1,-2 or sometimes even more.

Insane Heroism:

Occasionally, warriors will refuse to retreat even when faced with impossible odds or particularly harrowing experiences. Sometimes you can push someone just too far! A roll of double 1 on the 2D6 always passes a Morale check, regardless of any modifiers.

The most common reasons a unit must take a Morale check are as follows:

  • Pinning Test: Units suffering at least one unsaved wound from a shooting weapon in the shooting phase that has the Pinning special rule must immediately take a Morale check. If they fail, they become Pinned Down: they immediately Go to Ground, hiding themselves behind whatever they can find and covering themselves with their shields in fear.
  • A unit losing 25% or more of its current models during a single Shooting phase must take a Morale check at the end of that phase or immediately Fall Back.
  • Break Test: Units that lose a close combat(see above) must pass a Morale check to hold their ground. If they fail, they must Fall Back. Units taking this Morale check suffer a -1 Ld for each point they lost by(subtract their score from the opponent's higher score).
  • Panic Test: If a friendly unit Falls Back through another friendly unit(see below), the unit that the friendly unit is running through must pass a Morale check to hold their ground. If they fail, they too must Fall Back.

Fall Back:

Sometimes retreat is the only option left to a soldier on the battlefield. A withdrawal can give troops the chance to retire to a stronger position, to regroup and mount a fresh attack, or to hold back the approaching enemy. Of course, a retreat is not without its risks.

Units make a Fall Back move immediately upon failing a Morale check - the only moves they can make in subsequent phases are Fall Back moves until they Regroup. In each subsequent Movement phase, they will make further Fall Back moves instead of moving normally, until the unit Regroups, is destroyed or leaves the table.

Most units fall back 2D6". Fall Back moves are not slowed by difficult terrain, but incur Dangerous Terrain tests, as normal. Units with models that Fall Back at different speeds always Fall Back at the speed of the slowest model in the unit. Units that are falling back always count as being in the Skirmish formation until they leave the table or rally.

Each model in the unit moves directly towards their own table edge by the shortest possible route. If playing a mission where there is no 'own' table edge, models move towards the closest table edge instead.

If any model from a unit that is falling back moves into contact with a table edge, that model is removed from the game as a casualty, as it scatters and flees the battle.

Falling Back from Close Combat:

Models falling back from a combat can freely move through all enemy models that were involved in that combat (they have already missed the chance to catch them) This is an exception to the normal rules for moving that state that a model cannot move through a space occupied by another model. If any models would end their move less than 1" from one of these enemies, extend the Fall Back move until they are clear.

Friendly Models:

If, when rolling to fall back, a unit rolls a high enough score to completely pass over a friendly unit along the shortest possible route, it ignores those models for the purposes of falling back. That unit must take a Panic Test if this occurs(see above). If the unit falling back is unable to completely pass through friendly models without ending its move with at least one model touching one of them, it treats them as an obstacle instead. It goes around them along the shortest possible route(maintaining coherency), and might become trapped.

Trapped:

Sometimes a unit finds its Fall Back move blocked by impassable terrain, friendly models or enemy models. The unit may move around these obstructions in such a way as to get back to their table edge by the shortest route, maintaining unit coherency, even if this means moving away from their table edge. If the unit cannot perform a full Fall Back move in any direction without doubling back, it is destroyed (see below).

Morale and Falling Back:

Units that are falling back automatically fail all Morale checks, but can Regroup, as discussed next:

Regrouping:

Just because a unit Falls Back doesn't mean it is out of the fight. Courageous officers will try to inspire their troops to rally. Warriors might regain their will to fight out of honour, duty or sheer bloody-mindedness.

A unit that is falling back must attempt to Regroup by taking a Regroup test in their Movement phase just before they move.

  • If at least 50% of the unit's models are still alive, this is a normal Leadership test.
  • If less than 50% of the unit's models are still alive, then the Leadership test can only be passed with an Insane Heroism result of double 1. The exception to this is regrouping when assaulted (see right).
  • If the unit fails its Regroup test, then it must immediately continue to Fall Back.
  • If the unit successfully passes the test, it stops falling back and can immediately move up to 3". This move is unaffected by difficult terrain, but Dangerous Terrain tests must be taken as normal. If the unit is out of coherency when the Regroup test is made, then the 3" move must be used to restore coherency, or as near as possible. Units that Fight in Ranks Reform instead, following the rules for Reforming(see page XX).

Once a unit has regrouped, it cannot otherwise move or shoot this turn(so cannot Shoot or March in the Shooting phase or charge in the Close Combat phase).

Falling Back and Charges:

A unit that is falling back cannot charge.

Falling Back and Multiple Combats:

Sometimes, as part of a multiple combat, a charging unit declares charges against one or more units that are falling back as well as one or more units that are not. If the primary or secondary targets of a multiple charge are falling back, each retreating unit must test to Regroup as soon as one charging model is found to be within charge range (see below).

Regrouping When Charged:

Units that have charges declared against them while falling back must always test to Regroup as soon as the enemy is found to be within charge range. This test is always a normal Leadership test, and does not require Insane Heroism, regardless of the number of models remaining in the unit.

  • If the test is failed, the charged unit is removed as a casualty at the end of the Charge sub-phase.
  • If the test is successful, the unit Regroups (without moving), and the fight continues as normal, starting with the enemy moving his charging models.
  • The unit is considered to continue to be in Skirmish Formation if charged in this manner for the duration of the combat. If it leaves combat, it consolidates into its normal Formation.

Regrouping and Multiple Charges:

If the test is successful, that unit regroups (without moving) and the charge continues as normal(see details above). If the test is failed, the falling back unit is destroyed and the charging model must continue its charge move against the remaining enemy units as if the falling back unit was never there.

MAGIC[edit]

The mysterious powers of Magicka, the crop of Aetherius, the secrets that hold the world of Nirn together, are often drawn from upon the battlefield. Harnessing them can be the key to victory.

Power Dice[edit]

Spells are cast using Power Dice, representing the current amount of Magicka that a mage has concentrated his mind upon and is channeling. Each model begins the game with Power Dice equal to its Magicka characteristic(Mg). The number of Power Dice a model currently holds is its Power Dice Pool. "Replenishing" Power Dice means to gain that number of Power Dice up to a model's Magicka characteristic. To "gain" Power Dice is to simply gain that number.

At the start of each of your turns, before any other action is taken, empty the Power Dice pools of all your units. Replenish their Power Dice Pools up to the maximum number allowed by their Magicka characteristic.

To keep track of how many Power Dice a model currently has, it may be beneficial to keep a die next to it with the correct number on it. For most models, however, the number of Power Dice will be quite simple to remember, especially for those that will never use them. When in doubt, mark a model or unit to keep track of an unusual number or distribution of Power Dice.

Casting a Spell[edit]

Spells in Scrollhammer can range from mundane utilities giving a wizard an slight edge in battle, to world-shifting sorceries. Spells are cast as needed, as required by their individual rules.

As noted in the Equipping section of the rules(see page XX), a model with a hand open for spellcasting may cast any variety of spells from that hand, the same spell any number of time from that hand, different spells from different hands, and use a staff in that hand in addition to spells cast, as long as it continues to have enough Power Dice to do so.

Casting Cost:

Each spell has a Casting Cost. These costs can range from a simple charm (3+) to a grand inferno of fire and ice(20+ or perhaps even higher). A model attempting to cast a spell must roll equal to or higher than the casting cost to cast it.

A spell's rules will say when it is appropriate to cast. A spell that can be cast "at any time" may be cast at any time, during a model's rolls, or between a model's rolls to hit and to wound. However, spells can be cast in response to another spell; in this case, the latest spell to be cast always resolves first, and is followed by the rest in the reverse order they were cast.

Rolling to Cast a Spell:

If a model declares itself to be casting a spell, its controller decides how many of that model's Power Dice will be expended upon that spell. Remove that many Power Dice from the model's Power Dice Pool. Roll the Power Dice as d6s. If the result is equal to or higher than the casting cost, the spell goes off! If the result is lower than the casting cost, the spell sputters and dies: it fails to go off.

Surge:

If a model fails to cast a spell, it may attempt to pour more magicka into it, in a final attempt to cast it. That model's controller may take one last chance to assign any additional number of Power Dice from the model's Power Dice Pool to the spell. Remove those dice from the pool. They must be rolled as d3s, however: the mage is in a rush to gain control of the magicka around him!

Casting Cost is Too High?:

If a model does not have the power dice necessary to reach the minimum cost to cast a spell, and no other abilities can allow him to possibly reach the casting cost, he may not attempt to cast that spell. His brain is simply unprepared to handle such dangerous energies!

Magical Shooting Attacks:

Certain Spells are resolved as Shooting Attacks. These spells must be used in the Shooting Phase just as one might fire a ranged weapon, unless stated otherwise in the rules. When a unit is declared to be shooting, any number of models in that unit with spells equipped may attempt to make magical shooting attacks if able to. Those models attempt to cast the spells(see above). If a model succeeds, and has Power Dice left over, it may continue to cast magical shooting attacks if it wishes too, making multiple magical shooting attacks that phase(including multiples of the same one!). After the model's controller is satisfied with the number of magical shooting attacks made, or no further magical shooting attacks can be made, roll to hit with the magical shooting attacks as normal, along with any other models in the unit that are firing.

Multiple Casters:

If there are multiple spellcasters in a unit, using their spells at the same time, roll different colored dice for each one to differentiate them. Of course, if a group of spellcasters are are using the same spell with the exact same profile of requirements and effects, and are each rolling a single die, you may simply roll them all at once, counting each die as a different model's spell! The same differentiations apply for rolling for Surging.

Damage Types and Magical Effects[edit]

There are a vast number of magical effects found across all Nirn. Certain ones are found in the list of Universal Special Rules on page XX. Others are noted here, having certain conditions applied to them:

Damage Types:

There are many types of damage that exist in Scrollhammer. A weapon may have more than one damage type:

Mundane: All attacks are Mundane by default. This represents raw physical strength.

  • Otherworldly: A weapon that is Otherworldly is considered Mundane, except that its controller may choose to count it as magic or as mundane at any time(thus bypassing any resistances a model might have to either).

Magic: Attacks, hits wounds caused by Magic items, Artifacts, and spells deal Magic damage. Magic Items, Artifacts and spells are always Magic: if they would have Otherworldly, they lose that ability.

Spell: Attacks, hits and wounds caused by Spells deal Spell damage.

Elemental: Certain attacks have an element to their damage, an unusual means of harming the enemy that can be both a blessing and a curse at times. Not all elemental attacks deal Magic damage.

  • Flame: The element of Flame is used for cleansing the foe with fire.
  • Shock: The element of Shock is used for melting enemies with lightning.
  • Frost: The element of Frost is used for freezing, piercing and tearing apart the unprepared with ice, snow and chill.
  • Poison: The element of Poison is used to weaken and destroy the enemy with toxins. Virtually everything that uses Poison has the Poisoned special rule(see page XX), in addition to the Poison element.

Multiple Damage Types:

An attack may have one element, and may either be Mundane, Otherworldly, Magic or both Magic and Spell. If an attack has both Mundane and Otherwordly, it is Otherworldly. If it has either Mundane and/or Otherworldly and Magic, it is Magic. If it deals Spell damage, it always deals both Magic and Spell damage. An effect with a single element always uses that element.

If an effect has multiple elements, the controlling player chooses which element to use. It may only use the Poisoned special rule(if it has it) if Poison is the chosen element.

Other Effects:

Most spells have unique effects to them. Magical effects found in these rules have special things to be noted. Many other effects will be found in the list of Special Rules on page XX.

Healing: An effect that "Heals" on a certain roll(i.e. "Heals on a d6 4+") immediately restores a single wound to a model if the roll succeeds. Only one Healing roll may be made per model per turn, regardless of outcome.

Lower Resists: Damage against a model with Lowered Resists may be treated as not having any element if it would normally have one(the damage does not lose Poisoned if it has it), and/or may be treated as magic, mundane or otherworldly regardless of the source(even if it's from a spell!) at the discretion of the opponent of the controller of the model with Lowered Resists.

Disease: Diseases are negative effects that can be placed on models. They never deal magic or spell damage, even if caused by a spell, unless specifically stated to deal magic or spell damage in their rules. Diseases usually have unique effects with their own rules. If an effect "cures" a disease, remove the disease from the model cured; if it is a constant outside effect, that model simply ignores the effect until end of turn. If a model is unaffected by disease, he does not count as having that disease should it have an in-game means to spread.

Summoning[edit]

Some models are capable of summoning other models to their side during battle. A Summoned model is always taken with no upgrades, unless specifically given the option of upgrades. When a Summon spell is cast, if you have a model to place, proceed as follows:

  • If there are no other Summoned units in your army within 12" of caster, place the Summoned model in a legal location within 6" of caster as a new, single model unit using the Horde formation. Independent Characters can join this unit. The summoned unit counts as having arrived by Deep Strike this turn.
  • If there is another Summoned unit in your army within 12" of caster, place the Summoned model in a legal location as part of that Summoned unit, in coherency with it. The summoned unit counts as having arrived by Deep Strike this turn.

Each model may have up to one Summoned model in play at any given time. Summoned models can never hold objectives, and nor will eliminating them grant kill points to your opponent. If the summoner is removed as a casualty, the summoned model is immediately removed a casualty as well.

If you do not have a model to place as a summoned model, then the spell has no effect.

Summon Horde:

There is no limit to the number of models summoned by Summon Horde spells any one model may have in play, as long as the controlling player has enough models to place. A Summoned Horde is not removed as a casualty when the summoner is slain.

Special Rules[edit]

Whenever a creature or weapon has an ability that breaks or bends one of the main game rules, it is represented by a special rule. A special rule might improve a model's chances of causing damage by granting it poisoned weapons, or give it a boost to its Strength. Conversely a special rule may improve a model's survivability by granting it resistance to pain, or the ability to regrow damaged flesh. Special rules allow snipers to target the weak spots of their foes, scouts to range ahead of the army and heroes to decapitate great beasts.

What Special Rules do I have?:

It may seem obvious, but unless stated otherwise, a model does not have a special rule. Most special rules are given to a model by the relevant entry in its Army Book. That said, a model's Attacks can gain special rules because of the weapon it is using. Similarly, a model might get special rules as the result of spells, scenario special rules or being hunkered down in a particular type of terrain.

Where this is the case the rule that governs the magic spell, scenario or terrain type in question will make this abundantly clear.

Most of the more commonly used special rules in Scrollhammer are listed here, but this is by no means an exhaustive list. Many troops have their own unique abilities, which are laid out in their army book.

For ease of consultation, we've presented the special rules in alphabetical order. There's also an index at the back of the book to help you locate any particular special rule you're after.

A-G[edit]

Absorb

A model or weapon with Absorb Health(X+), if inflicting a wound, may roll a d6. On an X+, that model restores a wound up to its starting amount. Hitting with an Absorb weapon does not count as an attempt to Heal, but only one wound can be restored per turn per model, which counts as Healing for the turn.

A model or weapon with Absorb Magicka(Y on an X+), if hitting an enemy, may roll a d6. On an X+, the enemy model suffers Magicka Drain(Y), and the absorbing model immediately gains Y power dice.

Acute Senses

If a unit contains at least one model with this special rule, and that unit arrives on a random table edge (due to Outflank, or other special rules), then you can re-roll to see which table edge they arrive from.

Atronach

An Atronach is an elemental golem native to the planes of Oblivion. Atronachs can never hold objectives.

Autohit

This attack automatically hits. If it would use the scatter die, it never scatters.

Backfire

Whenever a model with this special rule, or using a melee attack with this special rule rolls to hit in close combat, on the roll of a 1(after any re-rolls), that model takes a wound, saves allowed as normal.

Whenever a model fires a ranged weapon with this special rule rolls to hit at a range, on the roll of a 1(after any re-rolls), that model takes a wound, saves allowed as normal.

Template and Blast weapons with Backfire roll a die separate from the weapon. On the roll of a 1, the model shooting the weapon takes a wound, saves allowed as normal, even if the weapon hits.

Barrage

Barrage weapons act as Blast or Large Blast weapons(see below), with following additional rules:

  • Barrage weapons are always Pinning.
  • Barrage weapons determine Cover Save(if any) from the central hole of marker.
  • Barrage weapons can fire indirectly. If so, they can fire even without Line of Sight, but always roll full scatter.

Multiple Barrages: Place the barrage weapon template from one of the weapons first, before the other weapons are resolved. Then scatter as normal. Remaining shots scatter to touch the edge of the first template at the angle of the scatter. If a Hit! is rolled, the controlling player may choose at which angle to put the template, or to put it at the same spot as the first hit. After placing all the templates, resolve hits and wounds

Bestial Instinct

This model is merely an animal, and so can never hold objectives(of course, this doesn't stop models without Bestial Instinct in its unit from doing so, if otherwise allowed to).

Blast and Large Blast

A weapon's profile might designate it as being Blast or Large Blast; Blast refers to the (3") blast marker and Large Blast refers to the (5") blast marker. Large Blasts follow all of the rules for Blasts.

When firing a Blast weapon, models do not roll to hit as normal. Instead, place the blast marker over a model in the enemy unit that is in range and Line of Sight, so that the center hole is entirely over that model. You may position it to attempt to put over certain other models. Roll the Scatter Die and 2d6. In the case of a Hit!, keep the relevant blast marker there, and count the models whose bases it is over. You cannot place the blast marker so that the base of any friendly models or units locked in combat are even partially under it.

The large area affected by the blast means it's going to be very hard to miss completely. Nonetheless, the shot might not land exactly where intended. If your model rolled a Miss, roll for the blast marker to scatter and subtract the firer's Ballistic Skill from the distance that it scatters, to a minimum of 0". Note that it is possible, and absolutely fine, for a shot to scatter beyond the weapon's maximum or minimum range and line of sight.

This represents the chance of ricochets, the attack blasting through terrain, and other random events. In these cases, hits are worked out as normal and can hit and wound units out of range and line of sight (or even your own units, or models locked in combat!). If the shot scatters so that the hole in the centre of the marker is beyond the table's edge, the shot is a complete miss and is discarded.

Once the final position of the blast market has been determined, take a good look at it from above - each unit with models under the marker suffers one hit for each model with its base fully or partially beneath the blast marker (see diagram). This even applies to units whose models are out of range or line of sight!

Once the number of hits inflicted on the unit has been worked out, roll To wound and save as normal. Any unsaved wounds are then allocated on the unit as for a normal shooting attack.

Multiple Blasts: If a unit is firing more than one shot with the Blast special rule, resolve each shot, one at a time, as described above. Scatter each individually, then determine how many hits are scored by each blast marker. Finally, resolve these, and the rest of the unit's shots, as normal.

Blast Weapons and Rerolls:

If a model can reroll with a Blast weapon, they reroll all their dice to-hit with the weapon, including the scatter die.

Blind

A Blinded model gets -1 to hit for the duration of the effect. If a duration of this effect is not given, count it as lasting until the end of next turn.

Chameleon

A model with Chameleon has a 6+ cover save in Close Combat. A unit consisting entirely of models with Chameleon have Stealth(+1). A model with Chameleon(X) gets Stealth(+X) if it is in a unit consisting entirely of models with Chameleon, and always has the minimum cover save that it would get from Stealth(X) in close combat.

Chill

A Chilled model gets -1 Initiative. If a duration of this effect is not given, count it as lasting until the end of next turn.

Command

A Commanded model is an opponents model. If it is successfully Commanded, it attacks the nearest model in its own unit (randomly picked if tied), and then is attacked back by that model, during close combat. Those models fight each other: they cannot attack their enemies that round. You may choose to equip any set of items for the Commanded model, even if other items were already equipped, but once chosen each turn, you cannot equip different items, unless a special rule says otherwise. Once a model has been Commanded, you control any spells or optional special abilities it might use as long as it is Commanded.

Counter-Attack

If a unit contains at least one model with this special rule is charged, it may attempt to Counter-Attack if it is not Pinned Down/Gone to Ground or already locked in combat. It must choose to hold as a reaction to the charge in order to do so. To Counter-Attack, the unit takes a Leadership test. If it passes, the models in the unit gain all bonuses that they would get for charging; both sides count as having charged this round!

Critical Strike

Each To Wound roll of 6 this model or weapon rolls has Multiple Wounds(d3) and ignores Feel No Pain(see below)

Deep Strike

In order for a unit to be able to Deep Strike, all models in the unit must have the Deep strike special rule and the unit must start the game in reserve. When placing the unit in reserve, you must tell your opponent that it will be arriving by Deep Strike (sometimes called Deep Strike reserve).

Some units that must arrive by Deep Strike. They always begin the game in reserve and always arrive by Deep Strike. When working out how many units can be placed in reserve, units that must be deployed by Deep Strike (along with any models embarked upon them) are ignored. In addition, a unit that must arrive by Deep Strike must do so even if you are playing a special mission where the Reserves special rule is not being used. of course, all the Standard Missions presented later do use Reserves, so you won't usually need to worry about this distinction.

Arriving By Deep Strike Roll for the arrival of all deep striking units as specified in the rules for Reserves and then deploy them as follows:

  • First, place one model from the unit anywhere on the table, in the position where you would like it to arrive, and roll for scatter to determine the model's final position.
  • Next, the unit's remaining models are arranged around the first one. Models must be placed in base contact with the first model in a circle around it. When the first circle is complete, a further concentric circle must be placed with each model touching the circle inside it. Each circle must include as many models as will fit.
  • Models deploying via Deep Strike treat all difficult terrain as dangerous terrain.

In the Movement phase during which they arrive, deep striking units may not move any further, other than to disembark from a deep striking transport unit if they are in one. Units deep striking into ruins are placed on the ground floor. Deep striking units count non-ruined buildings (except for their battlements) as impassable terrain. In that turn's Shooting phase, these units can fire (or March) as normal, and obviously count as having moved in the previous Movement phase. In that turn's Close Combat phase, however, these units cannot charge. This also applies to units that have disembarked from transports models that arrived by Deep Strike that turn.

Deep Strike Mishaps:

If any of the models in a deep striking unit cannot be deployed, because at least one model would land partially or fully off the table, in impassable terrain, on top of a friendly model, or on top of or within 1 " of an enemy model, something has gone wrong. The controlling player must roll on the Deep strike Mishap table and apply the results. If the unfortunate unit is also a transport, the Deep strike Mishap result applies to both the unit and anything embarked within it.

Deep Strike Mishap Table:

1: Destroyed! The unit is immediately removed as a casualty

2-3: Misplaced! Your opponent may choose where to place the Deep Striking unit(anywhere on the table)

4-6: Delayed! The unit goes back into reserves, to attempt to Deep Strike again next turn as permitted by the rules for Reserves

Dragonborn

A model with this special rule is immune to the effects of Instant Death. In addition, if it is a Tongue, it automatically passes the Leadership test required to use the Thu'um.

Eternal Warrior

A model with this special rule is immune to the effects of Instant Death.

Ethereal

An Ethereal model has a 4+ Ward save against Mundane attacks.

Fear

A unit that causes Fear has an intimidating presence on the battlefield. Enemy units must pass a Leadership test to charge a unit containing one or more models that cause Fear. If a unit has a charge declared against it by an enemy that causes Fear, it must immediately take a Morale test. If it fails, and is outnumbered by the charging unit, it must flee as its charge reaction. If it fails and has equal or greater numbers to the charging unit, it is reduced to WS1 this round of combat, should the enemy charge succeed. If the Morale check is passed, the combat is resolved as normal.

A unit that containing at least one model that causes Fear is itself immune to Fear, and treats models that cause Terror as causing Fear instead.

Fearless

A unit containing one or more models with the Fearless special rule automatically pass all types Morale tests, Fear tests and Regroup tests. They cannot Go to Ground for any reason, however. They cannot flee as a charge reaction.

No Retreat!: If a Fearless unit loses combat, instead of testing morale, it takes extra wounds. For each point a side lost the combat by, if any number of units in that combat are Fearless, an additional wound must be allocated to those models(these wounds do not count further towards combat results). Saves may be taken as normal against these wounds.

You may attempt to have your Fearless units suffering No Retreat wounds gather their senses: you may roll an Initiative test to avoid some of the wounds, on the highest value among your Fearless units in the combat. If they succeed, reduce the number of No Retreat wounds taken by d3.

Feel No Pain

When a model with this special rule suffers an unsaved Wound, it can make a special Feel No Pain roll to avoid being wounded (this is not a saving throw). Roll a D6 each time an unsaved Wound is suffered. On a 4 or less, you must take the Wound as normal. On a 5+, the unsaved Wound is discounted - treat it as having been saved. Note that Feel No Pain rolls cannot be made against unsaved Wounds that inflict Instant Death.

If a unit has the Feel No Pain special rule with a number in brackets afterwards - Feel No Pain (6+), for example - then the number in brackets is the D6 result needed to discount the Wound.

Fleet of Foot

There are many variants of this rule: Fleet of Foot, Fleet of Claw, Fleet of Hoof.

Title aside, all models with these abilities are treated the same. A unit composed entirely of models with this special rule may add +d3 to its movement during the movement phase, and may re-roll failed charge distance rolls.

Fleshbane

If a model has this special rule, or is attacking with a Melee weapon that has this special rule, they always wound on a 2+ in close combat.

Similarly, if a model makes a shooting attack with a weapon that has this special rule, they always wound on a 2+.

Frenzy

A model with this special rule begins the game Frenzied. A Frenzied model:

  • must always attempt to charge the nearest unit in charge range, and cannot flee as a charge reaction. Non-frenzied models in the unit must still do this, as long as at least one model is Frenzied.
  • is immune to Fear, Terror and Panic
  • gains +1 bonus Attack

If a Frenzied unit is beaten in close combat, or fails a Morale check, it loses its Frenzied state for the remainder of the game. There are other special rules that may invoke a Frenzied state in a model under certain conditions.

Furious Charge

In a turn in which a model with this special rule charges or Counter-Attacks, it adds +1 to its Strength characteristic until the end of that phase.

H-Q[edit]

Hatred

Commonly, a model only has Hatred towards a specific type of foe, in which case, the unlucky target will be expressed, in brackets, after the special rule. This can refer to a whole army, or a specific unit from that army. For example, Hatred (Imperial Legion) would mean any models from that Army Book, whilst Hatred (Dragoons) would mean only Dragoons. A model striking a hated foe in close combat re-rolls all misses during the first round of each combat - he does not get to make re-rolls for Hatred in subsequent rounds. In addition, if charged by the Hated foe, this unit can never flee: in the case of a failed Fear or Terror test, the unit with Hatred is always reduced to WS1 regardless of unit size.

Hit and Run

A unit that contains at least one model with this special rule that is locked in combat can choose to leave close combat at the end of any Assault phase. If the unit wishes to do so, it must take an Initiative test.

  • If the test is failed, nothing happens and the models remain locked in the fight.
  • If the test is passed, choose a direction - then roll 3D6. As long as the distance rolled, in inches, is sufficient to allow the entire unit to move over 1 " away from all of the enemy units they are engaged in combat with, the unit breaks away from combat and immediately moves a number of inches in the chosen direction equal to the 3D6 result, ignoring the units they were locked in combat with. No Sweeping Advance rolls are made. Enemy units that are no longer locked in combat immediately Consolidate D6".

A Hit & Run move is not slowed by difficult terrain, but treats dangerous terrain normal. It may not be used to make an illegal move into other units or impassable terrain, and models instead stop immediately(1 " away in the case of enemy models). Nor can the unit move out of coherency: the unit moves as far as it can without doing so. If there are units with this rule on both sides who wish to disengage, roll-off to determine who goes first and then alternate disengaging them. If the last of these ends up no longer in combat, it Consolidates instead.

Ignores Cover

Cover saves cannot be taken against Wounds caused by weapons with the Ignores Cover special rule.

Immunity

A model with "Immune to X" is completely immune to that particular type of damage. For example, a model with Immune to Flame is unaffected by Flame damage.

Exception: A model with Immune to Poison causes Poisoned attacks to roll normally against it, rather than using the Poisoned special rules. In addition, any weapons that count as having an unusual "poison" on them lose the special rules granted by that poison.

Infiltrate

Units that contain at least one model with this special rule may be deployed last, after all other units (friend and foe) have been deployed. If both sides have Infiltrators, the players roll-off and the winner decides who goes first, then alternate deploying these units. Infiltrators can be set up anywhere on the table that is more than 12" from any enemy unit, as long as no deployed enemy unit can draw line of sight to them. This includes in a building (see page XX), as long as the building is more than 12" from any enemy unit. Alternatively, they can be set up anywhere on the table more than 18" from any enemy unit, even in plain sight.

Having Infiltrate also confers the Outflank special rule to units of Infiltrators that are kept as Reserves (see page XX).

An Independent Character without the Infiltrate special rule cannot join a unit that has decided to Infiltrate during deployment.

Independent Character

Independent Characters can join other units. They cannot, however, join units that always consist of a single model (such as most vehicles and Monstrous Creatures). They can join other Independent Characters, though, to form a powerful multicharacter unit.

Joining and Leaving a Unit:

An Independent Character can begin the game already with a unit, either by being deployed in unit coherency with it or, if the unit is in reserve, by informing your opponent of which unit it has joined. In order to join a unit, an Independent Character simply has to move so that he is within the unit coherency distance of a friendly unit at the end of their Movement phase. If the Independent Character is within coherency of more than one unit at the end of its Movement phase, the player must declare which unit it is joining. If an Independent Character does not intend to (or cannot) join a unit, it must (where possible) remain out of coherency from it at the end of the Movement phase. This is to make clear whether they have joined a unit or not. Note that after an Independent Character joins a unit, that unit can move no further that Movement phase.

An Independent Character can leave a unit during the Movement phase by moving out of unit coherency with it. He cannot join or leave during any other phase - once arrows are let loose or charges are declared, it is too late to join in or duck out!

An Independent Character cannot leave a unit while either he or the unit is locked in combat, falling back or has gone to ground.

He cannot join a unit that is locked in combat or falling back. If an Independent Character joins a unit, and all other models in that unit are killed, he again becomes a unit of one model at the start of the following phase.

While an Independent Character is part of a unit, he counts as part of the unit for all rules purposes, though he still follows the rules for characters.

While an Independent Character is a unit of one model, or is part of a unit consisting of only Independent Characters, he uses the Skirmish Formation.

Heroic Morale:

A unit that contains one or more Independent Characters does not need a double 1 to Regroup if reduced to below 50% of its starting numbers, but instead tests as if it had at least 50% remaining.

Special Rules:

When an Independent Character joins a unit, it might have different special rules from those of the unit. Unless specified in the rule itself (as in the Stubborn special rule), the unit's special rules are not conferred upon the Independent Character, and the Independent Character's special rules are not conferred upon the unit. Special rules that are conferred to the unit only apply for as long as the Independent Character is with them.

Independent Characters and Ongoing Effects:

Sometimes, a unit that an Independent Character has joined will be the target of a beneficial or harmful effect. If the character leaves the unit, both he and the unit continue to be affected by the effect, so you'll need to mark the character accordingly. Conversely, if a character joins a unit after that unit has been the target of an ongoing effect (or joins a unit after himself having been the target of an ongoing effect) benefits and penalties from that effect are not shared.

Instant Death

Unsaved Wounds inflicted by an Attack with this special rule automatically inflict Instant Death, regardless of the victim's Toughness (see page XX).

Invisibility

An Invisible model:

  • Cannot be targeted or seen(but his unit still can be if it contains non-Invisible models)except in close combat. However, his unit can be targeted, if non-invisible models in the unit can be seen.
  • A unit consisting entirely of Invisible models must be charged as if through Difficult Terrain. Enemies cannot counter-attack a completely invisible unit. A completely Invisible unit has Stealth(+3) and Hit and Run.
  • An Invisible model may choose to strike at either Initiative 10 or Initiative 1 the first round of combat. He may choose not to attack each round of combat, however. An Invisible model has has a 4+ cover save in close combat.
  • If an Invisible model attack, shoots, uses an activated special ability, or tries to cast another spell, he instantly forfeits the Invisibility.

Magicka Drain

A model hit by Magicka Drain(X) replenishes X fewer Power Dice at the start of its controller's next turn. If that model would replenish less Power Dice than it currently has due to this effect, it instead replenishes as many as it currently has. If the model has equal or more Power Dice than its Mg, it immediately loses Power Dice until it has 1 less than its Mg.

A model hit by Magicka Drain(total) immediately loses all its Power Dice, and does not replenish its Power Dice Pool at the start of its controller's next turn.

Master-Crafted

Weapons with the Master-crafted special rule allow the bearer to re-roll one failed roll To Hit per turn with that weapon.

Monster Hunter

A unit containing at least one model with this special rule re-rolls all failed to-wound rolls against Monstrous Creatures.

Move Through Cover

A unit that contains at least one model with this special rule rolls an extra D6 when rolling to move through difficult terrain. In most circumstances, this will mean that the unit rolls 3D6 and picks the highest roll.

In addition, when marching through difficult terrain, the unit rolls an extra die, whether a d3 or a d6(whichever is required). In most circumstances, this will mean that the unit rolls 3D3 and picks the highest roll.

This does not apply to charges through difficult terrain.

Multiple Wounds

Each unsaved wound inflicted by this attack deals multiple wounds. For example, wounds created by a weapon with Multiple Wounds(d3) split into d3 wounds when they are inflicted.

Night Fighting

This mission special rule is described in full detail on page XX.

Night Eye

A model with this special rule ignores the effects of Night Fighting.

Outflank

During deployment, players can declare that any unit that contains at least one model with this special rule is attempting to Outflank the enemy. This means they are making a wide sweeping move to get behind enemy lines or come at the foe from an unexpected direction.

When an Outflanking unit arrives from Reserves, but not Ongoing Reserve, the controlling player rolls a D6.

  • On a 1 -2, the unit comes in from the table edge to the left of their controlling player's own table edge
  • On a 3-4, they come on from the right
  • On a 5-6, the player can choose left or right

Models move onto the table as described for other Reserves.

An Independent Character that cannot outflank cannot join a unit that has decided to outflank during deployment.

Paralyze

A Paralyzed model is reduced to WS1 I1 and treats all terrain as difficult. If a duration of this effect is not given, count it as lasting until the end of next turn.

Physical God

This model is the physical incarnation, or perhaps even the true form, of a god. It has a 2+ Ward Save, Eternal Warrior, and Feel No Pain, cannot be Silenced, and is unaffected by Disease. This model is not a mortal(see page XX).

Pinning

If a non-vehicle unit suffers one or more unsaved wounds from a weapon with the Pinning special rule, it must immediately take a morale test. This is called a Pinning test.

If the unit fails the test, it is pinned and must immediately Go to Ground (see page XX). It has become pinned down. As the unit has already taken its saves, going to ground does not protect it against the fire of the Pinning weapon that caused the test (or indeed from any other weapon fired by the same unit that phase) - it's too late!

As long as the test is passed, a unit can be called upon to take multiple Pinning tests in a single turn, but only once for each unit shooting at them. If a unit has already gone to ground, no further Pinning tests are taken.

If the special rules of a unit specifies that the unit can never be Pinned, the unit automatically passes Pinning tests. Such units can still Go to Ground voluntarily if they wish.

Poisoned

If a model has the Poisoned special rule, or is attacking with a Melee weapon that has the Poisoned special rule, it always wounds on a fixed number (generally shown in brackets) unless a lower result would be required, when attacking in close combat. In addition, if the Strength of the wielder (or the poisoned weapon) is the same or higher than the Toughness of the victim, the wielder must re-roll failed rolls To Wound in close combat. Similarly, if a model makes a shooting attack with a weapon that has the Poisoned special rule, it always wounds on a fixed number (generally shown in brackets), unless a lower result would be required. If no number is shown in brackets, the rule is Poisoned (4+). Unless otherwise stated, Poisoned attacks without a given Strength are treated as having a Strength of 1.

Precision

If a model or weapon with the Precision Strike ability rolls a 6 to hit in close combat, its controller, not the opponent, allocates those wounds. Likewise its controller, not the opponent, determines which models the rolls of 6 counted as hitting and wounding for the purposes of any abilities they might have. If the model has two separate profiles, such as Monstrous Cavalry, or is Artillery, the controller chooses against which profile the precision strike is rolled; the wound and all other effects must be assigned to that one.

If a model or weapon with the Precision Shot ability rolls a 6 to hit while shooting, its controller, not the opponent, allocates those wounds. Likewise its controller, not the opponent, determines which models the rolls of 6 counted as hitting and wounding for the purposes of any abilities they might have. If the model has two separate profiles, such as Monstrous Cavalry, or is Artillery, the controller chooses against which profile the precision strike is rolled; the wound and all other effects must be assigned to that one. Shots fired from a Stand and Shoot action can never be precision shots.

Look out, Sir!: If the model targeted by a precision strike or precision shot is a character, the opponent may roll a d6: on the roll of a 3+, the strike or shot is reassigned as per the usual rules(usually the opponent's choice). This may only be rolled once per model per strike or shot, and the model that it is reassigned to must be declared immediately, and treated as the model hit by the attack. In the case of multiple profile models or Artillery, the Look Out Sir! may target another model of a different type, a multiple profile model or an artillery piece in the unit, or it target itself(in which case, the hit is randomly allocated to one profile/model as usual).

Preferred Enemy

This rule is often presented as Preferred Enemy (X) where X identifies a specific type of foe. If the special rule does not specify a type of foe, then everyone is a Preferred Enemy of the unit. A unit that contains at least one model with this special rule re-rolls failed To Hit and To Wound rolls of 1 if attacking its Preferred Enemy. This applies to both shooting and close combat attacks.

R-Z[edit]

Rampage

At the start of any Fight sub-phase, models with the Rampage special rule gain +D3 Attacks if the combat they are in contains more enemy models than friendly models - count all models in all units locked in the combat, not just those models that are engaged. Calculate each rampaging model's bonus Attacks separately.

Regeneration

At the beginning of each of your turns, roll a d6 for each wound on this model less than its starting amount. For each roll of a 6, one wound is restored. Regeneration(X), such as Regeneration(4+), indicates a different roll in brackets necessary to regenerate a wound.

If a model has multiple values for Regeneration, it may choose which one to use, but may only use one per turn.

Relentless

Relentless models treat all weapons as Fire and Charge, and ignore all movement, marching, shooting and charge restrictions on spells they cast.

Rending

If a model has the Rending special rule, or is attacking with a Melee weapon that has the Rending special rule, there is a chance that his close combat attacks will strike a critical blow. For each To Wound roll of a 6, the target automatically suffers a Wound, regardless of his Toughness. These Wounds are resolved at AP5. Similarly, if a model makes a shooting attack with a weapon that has the Rending special rule, a To Wound roll of 6 wounds automatically, regardless of Toughness, and is resolved at AP 5.

  • Killing Blow

A model or weapon with the Killing Blow special rule has the Rending Special Rule. In addition, its Rending attacks cause Instant Death against models other than Monstrous Creatures and Artillery pieces.

  • Heroic Killing Blow

A model or weapon with Heroic Killing Blow has the Rending Special Rule. In addition, so skillful and mighty are the strikes that Rending attacks from that model or weapon cause Instant Death against all models other than Artillery pieces.

Reserves

This mission special rule is described in full detail on page XX.

Scout

After both sides have deployed (including Infiltrators), but before the first player begins his first turn, a unit containing at least one model with this special rule can choose to redeploy. If the unit is Infantry, Artillery, or a Monstrous Creature, each model can redeploy anywhere entirely within 6" of its current position. If it is any other unit type, each model can instead redeploy anywhere entirely within 12" of its current position.

During this redeployment, Scouts must remain more than 12" away from any enemy unit. A unit that makes a Scout redeployment cannot charge in the first turn. A unit cannot embark or disembark as part of a Scout redeployment. If both sides have Scouts, roll-off, the winner decides who redeploys first.

Then alternate redeploying Scout units.

This rule also confers the Outflank special rule (see page XX).

If an Independent Character without the Scout special rule was joined to a unit of Scouts during deployment, that unit cannot redeploy.

Shred

If a model has the Shred special rule, or is attacking with a Melee weapon that has the Shred special rule, it re-rolls failed To Wound rolls in close combat.

Similarly, if a model makes a shooting attack with a weapon that has the Shred special rule, it re-rolls its failed To Wound rolls.

Silence

A model that is Silenced cannot cast spells or use the Thu'um. If a duration of this effect is not given, count it as lasting until the end of next turn.

Slow

Any model that is Slowed gets -1 Initiative and moves as if it is in difficult terrain. It is a good idea to mark affected models with counters or coins so that you remember. Monstrous Creatures are immune to the effects of Slow.

Slow and Purposeful

A unit that contains at least one model with this special rule cannot March or make a sweeping advance, but counts as Relentless.

Sniper

If a weapon has the Sniper special rule, or is fired by a model with the Sniper special rule, each To Hit roll of a 6 results in a Precision Shot (see page XX). Furthermore, if a weapon has the Sniper special rule, or is fired by a model with the Sniper special rule, its shooting attacks always wound on a To Wound roll of 4+ or better, regardless of the victim's Toughness.

Sniper weapons also have the Pinning and Rending special rules.

Soul Trap

If a model or weapon with this ability slays a model, that model(or model using the weapon) gains a soul gem counter, lasting until the game ends, or until it is spent. Keep track of soul gem counters using a die next to the model, if necessary. A model may spend one soul gem counter at any time to re-roll one miss or failed wound while using a magic weapon(other than a spell).

Split Fire

When a unit that contains at least one model with this special rule shoots, a model with this special rule may attempt to shoot at a different target to the rest of his unit. To do so, the unit must first take a Leadership test. If the test is failed, the unit shoots as normal. If the test is passed, choose one model in the unit with this special rule, and immediately make a shooting attack with it. Once this shooting attack has been resolved, resolve the shooting attacks made by the rest of the unit, which must be at a different target.

Stealth

A model with this special rule counts its cover saves during the Shooting Phase as being 1 point better than normal. Note that this means that a model with the Stealth special rule always has a cover save of at least 6+, even if it would not currently have a cover save. This rule is often presented as Stealth X, where X is a numerical value. Stealth(+2) indicates giving +2 to the model's cover save while in cover, or a 5+ save while no other cover save is available, and so on and so forth.

It may also be presented as Stealth (Y), where Y indicates a specific type of terrain, such as Stealth (Forests) or Stealth (Ruins). If this is the case, the unit only gains the benefit whilst it is in terrain of the specified type.

Multiple instances of Stealth stack.

Stubborn

When a unit that contains at least one model with this special rule takes Morale checks or Pinning tests, they ignore any negative Leadership modifiers. If a unit is both Fearless and Stubborn, it uses the rules for Fearless instead.

Swarms

  • If a Swarm suffers an unsaved Wound from a Blast, Large Blast or Template weapon, each unsaved wound is multiplied to two unsaved Wounds.
  • Swarms do not suffer Instant Death from taking an unsaved wound with Strength double their Toughness, unless that weapon is a Blast, Large Blast or Template weapon.
  • Swarms are adept at crossing terrain that would slow others - they are not slowed by Difficult Terrain, but must test for dangerous terrain as normal.
  • Swarms have the Stealth(+1) universal special rule against weapons other than Blast, Large Blast and Template weapons, being hard to hit.
  • Swarms can never hold objectives, and never block line of sight or grant a cover save to units blocked by them.

Template

A Template weapon is a shooting weapon does not roll to hit. To fire, place the teardrop-shaped Template so that the narrow end is touching the edge of the base of the firing model, and no friendly models or models locked in combat are underneath the Template. Enemy units underneath the Template are automatically hit, once for each model underneath.

Template weapons have Ignores Cover.

Terror

A model that causes Terror prompts the same tests as a model that causes Fear, except that if a unit charged by a Terror-causing unit fails its Terror test, it must always flee, even if it outnumbers the charging unit. If a unit passes a Terror test, whether to charge or in reaction to a charge, it treats Terror as Fear for the remainder of the game.

A unit containing at least one model that causes Terror is immune to Fear and Terror.

Torrent

When firing a weapon with this special rule, place the Template so that the narrow end is within 12" of the weapon and the wide end is no closer to the weapon than the narrow end. The weapon is then treated like any other Template weapon.

Tongue

This model may use the Thu'um(see page XX for details)

Two-Handed

This weapon or spell requires two open hands to equip(see page XX).

Unwieldy

A model attacking with this weapon does so at -1 Initiative, unless it is a Monstrous Creature.

  • Very Unwieldy A model attacking with this weapon strikes at Initiative 1, unless it is a Monstrous Creature.

Volley Fire

A shooting weapon with Volley Fire can be fired from an entire unit, not just from the front two ranks.

Ward

A spell with Ward, if cast in response to an enemy spell which would target or immediately effect caster, caster's unit, or another one of caster's spells, prompts a Ward attempt. The caster of the Ward spell and the caster of the enemy spell roll d6's, and add their respective Mg values to them. If caster of the Ward spell's final score is higher, he and his spells become immune to the effects of that spell for its duration. Hits resolved on him from the spell do nothing.

Unit Types[edit]

In most cases, it will be fairly obvious which unit type category a model falls into, but as unit type is essentially an extension of the characteristic profile, you'll be able to find that information in the relevant codex.

If your army book doesn't contain unit type information (as will be the case with some of the older volumes, or volumes not yet complete), then simply consult Appendix II of this book - you will find a complete at-a-glance bestiary that (amongst other things) lists each model's unit type.

Characters

In addition to their unit type, some models might also be noted as being characters.

We're not going to worry about characters here, however. They are such a powerful and important part of Scrollhammer that they have a section all to themselves later in the book (see page XX).

Infantry

In rare cases, an Infantry unit may comprise only a single model. Infantry are fairly slow moving, but can cross almost any terrain (given enough time) and make the best use of cover to avoid enemy fire.

As the bulk of the rules are concerned with them, there are no additional rules to present here.

Artillery

The Unit:

Artillery units consist of a number of crew models and the artillery piece models themselves. These units are quite complex as they can include several different types of models. The artillery piece models have a separate profile from the crew models. If all the crew models are killed, the artillery pieces are immediately removed as well.

Sometimes, the player has the choice of adding leaders or additional models to the crew of an Artillery unit. These models are part of the crew in all respects and can operate the artillery pieces as normal, even if they are otherwise slightly different from the rest of the crew. Independent Characters that join the unit, however, do not count as crew and cannot operate the artillery pieces, unless specifically stated in their rules.

Moving with Artillery:

Artillery guns need at least one crewman per artillery piece in order for the unit to move. If an Artillery unit does not have at least one crewman per gun, then it may not move: the remaining crewmen will not voluntarily leave a gun behind.

Shooting with Artillery:

Gun models cannot be fired if they moved at all in that turn's Movement phase.

Otherwise, one crewman that is in base contact with the artillery piece in the Shooting phase can fire it. The crewmen firing it cannot fire any weapons they are carrying, while the other crew members (and any Independent Characters in the unit) are free to fire their side arms, provided the whole unit shoots at the same target.

When firing the artillery pieces, there must be a line of sight to the target from both the model being fired and the crewman firing it (unless they are Barrage weapons, of course). Ranges are measured from the barrel on the artillery piece model.

Shooting at Artillery:

If shooting at an Artillery unit, roll a d6 for each hit. On a 1-3, the hit goes to the artillery piece and is resolved against its profile. On a 4-6, the hit goes to the crew and to any Independent Characters attached, and is resolved against their profiles.

If an Artillery unit chooses to Go to Ground, this does not increase the cover save of the artillery pieces - only the crew benefit.

Close Combat:

Artillery units cannot charge as long as they include any artillery pieces. Artillery pieces can never Stand and Shoot, but the crew can if they Fight in Ranks.

If an Artillery unit is charged, move the charging models into base contact with all the models as normal. No wounds can be allocated to the artillery pieces.

All engaged enemies roll To Hit and To wound against the crew (even if they are only engaged with the artillery pieces). Engaged crew models can, of course, fight back, but the artillery pieces do not.

Morale and Fall Back Moves:

For the purposes of Morale checks and other leadership tests, and for combat resolution, always ignore the actual artillery piece models, as if they were not there. Because they need at least one crewman per piece in order for the unit to move, if an Artillery unit does not have one crewman per piece when it is forced to Fall Back, any piece models without crewmen are abandoned and immediately removed as casualties. The rest of the unit then Falls Back as normal. If an Artillery unit is forced to Fall Back from close combat and the enemy is free to make a Sweeping Advance, then the Artillery unit automatically loses the Initiative test and is caught and destroyed by the victor.

Flyer Units

Unlike most other unit type categories, 'Flyer' is not a classification in and of itself. Instead, you'll find it occurs before another category - commonly Infantry, sometimes Monstrous Creatures and perhaps, rarely, other things. Flying units therefore share two sets of rules, the Flyer unit rules, and those of their base type. Flyer Infantry would, for example, follow the rules for Flyer units and Infantry.

Flyer units may choose to Fly once per turn, either instead of making their normal movement, or instead of making their normal charge. Note that the entire unit must always use the same form of movement. Units that are described as 'moving like' Flyer units follow all of the rules for Flyer units, and use the same special rules.

Skyborne:

When Flying (whether moving, charging or falling back, as we'll discuss in a moment) a model can move over all other models and all terrain freely.

Flying models cannot end their move on top of other models or impassable terrain.

Movement Phase:

If a Flyer model Flies in the Movement phase, it can move up to 12".

Close Combat Phase:

If a Flyer uses its Fly move instead to charge into melee combat, it can re-roll its charge distance, and never counts as charging through difficult terrain.

Fall Back Moves:

Flyers always count as Flying when falling back, even if they already used their Fly move that turn. Their Fall Back moves are 3D6".

Special Rules

Flyers have the Deep Strike special rule.

Monstrous Creatures

While Monstrous Creatures use many of the Infantry rules, their size and destructive capability make them a lot more dangerous.

Shooting:

Monstrous Creatures can fire up to two of their weapons each Shooting phase - they must, of course, fire both of them at the same target.

Shooting at Monstrous Creatures:

Monstrous Creatures cannot gain cover saves simply for being in area terrain. They must be obscured to gain the save. Monstrous Creatures cannot Go to Ground.

Close Combat:

So mighty are a Monstrous Creature's attacks that their melee attacks are AP5: most armor simply doesn't stand a chance.

When determining which side outnumbers another in a melee combat, a Monstrous Creature counts not as one model, but as multiple models towards its side, equal to its starting Wounds characteristic.

A Monstrous Creature in the Horde Formation counts as 2 models towards the number of models in the Formation, when calculating combat resolution.

Special Rules:

Monstrous Creatures have the Move Through Cover and Relentless special rules.

Beasts

Movement:

Beasts can move up to 6" in the Movement phase.

  • Fast Beasts may move an additional 3" in the Movement phase

Shooting:

Beasts can march up to 6", and do not require a Leadership test to march if they are within 9" of the enemy(although other models in the unit still might!).

Beasts roll multiple d6's and pick the highest when marching through cover, rather than d3's.

Close Combat:

Beasts roll 3d6" when charging. When charging through difficult terrain, they roll 4d6" and choose the three lowest dice.

Fall Back Moves:

Beasts make Fall Back moves just like Infantry, except that they move 3D6".

Special Rules:

Beasts have the Fleet of Foot and Move through Cover rules

Cavalry

Movement:

Cavalry can move up to 6" in the Movement phase.

  • Fast Cavalry may move an additional 3" in the movement phase

Shooting:

Cavalry can march up to 6".

Beasts roll multiple d6's and pick the highest when marching through cover, rather than d3's.

Close Combat:

Cavalry roll 3d6" when charging. When charging through difficult terrain, they roll 4d6" and choose the three lowest dice.

When calculating which side outnumbers the other in close combat, each Cavalry model(rider and steed) count as 2 models.

Fall Back Moves:

Cavalry make Fall Back moves just like Infantry, except that they move 3D6".

Special Rules:

Cavalry have the Fleet of Hoof special rule.

To represent the upper hand in battle granted by being mounted on a steed, Cavalry models have bonuses granted to their characteristics. Most Cavalry models are mounted on warhorses, granting them +1 Toughness and +1 Attack. Rules for the other types of steeds your Cavalry may be mounted on are found in their respective army books.

Monstrous Cavalry

A Monstrous Cavalry unit consists of a Monstrous Creature and one or more riders. Each have separate profiles. The Monstrous Creature uses the Monstrous Creature rules, and the rider(s) use the Infantry rules. The Riders begin the game mounted on the Monstrous Creature, and are unable to disembark unless a rule specifically states that they can.

The Monstrous Creature's movement, Initiative and Formation are always used, and any wounds from Dangerous Terrain checks are always assigned to it. Initiative Tests are always taken once for the entire model, rather than for individuals. Any special effect modifying Initiative always must target the Monstrous Creature to effect the Initiative of the model. Otherwise, the Riders are treated as separate models for all purposes (other than for rules that specifically require a model's base and/or movement) as the creature they are mounted on.

Shooting:

Monstrous Creatures can fire up to two of their weapons each Shooting phase - they must, of course, fire both of them at the same target.

Shooting at Monstrous Creatures:

Monstrous Creatures cannot gain cover saves simply for being in area terrain. They must be obscured to gain the save. Monstrous Creatures nor their Riders can Go to Ground.

Close Combat:

So mighty are a Monstrous Creature's attacks that their melee attacks are AP5: most armor simply doesn't stand a chance.

When determining which side outnumbers another in a melee combat, a Monstrous Creature counts not as one model, but as multiple models towards its side, equal to its starting Wounds characteristic. Furthermore, add 1 more to the number of models for each remaining Rider.

Monstrous Cavalry in the Horde Formation counts as 3 models towards the number of models in the Formation, when calculating combat resolution.

For each hit against against Monstrous Cavalry, roll a d6. On a 1-4, Monstrous Creature is hit. On a 5-6, the riders are hit. Resolve the wounds against those profiles. Assign wounds to different Riders as if they were separate models, and keep track of how many Riders have been slain/what effects are placed on the Riders.

If the Monstrous Creature is removed as a casualty, but the Riders still live, each Rider takes a hit at the monster's Strength, no saves allowed. The Riders continue to use the Monstrous Creature's base, so give the model a marker to note that the Monstrous Creature itself is no more. They must immediately make a Pinning test. Additional hits against the model continue to be assigned to the Riders as separate models.

In a unit containing multiple Monstrous Cavalry, if a Monstrous Creature is removed as a casualty, remove the Riders as a casualty too: even they survived, they're disoriented enough that they'll never keep up with the rest of the unit!

If all the Riders are removed as casualties, but the Monstrous Creature still lives, it must immediately take a Leadership Test on its own value.

  • If it fails, it loses Fearless(or any other ability preventing it from fleeing or automatically rallying it) for the rest of the game(if it has it), and must Fall Back.
  • If it succeeds, it becomes Fearless and Frenzied, and gains the Furious Charge special rule for the rest of the game! It continues to fight on.

Monstrous Creatures have the Move Through Cover and Relentless special rules.

Riders have the Relentless special rule.

Races and Birthsigns[edit]

Note: in terms of certain rules interactions, every model is either a

  • Mortal(models are Mortal unless stated otherwise)
  • Non-Mortal(certain models are this instead)

Common Races[edit]

Many models have a race, determining some of his physiological traits and abilities. The ten most common races found on Tamriel are listed in this section.

Arkay's Protection:

Models of the 10 common races may not be soul trapped, unless specifically allowed to be by a special rule. However, if the model has the Cavalry unit type, or is not either mortal or a vampire, it may be Soul Trapped as normal: in the former case, the steed is soul trapped, and in the latter case, the soul of the model follows radically different metaphysics than normal souls.

Argonian

Water Breathing: Argonians treat water features as open terrain, and gain a 6+ cover save while in it.

Histblood: Argonians ignore the effects of all diseases.

Breton

Dragon Skin: Bretons gain +2 to their Ward Save against all spells. If they do not already have a Ward Save, this ability grants them a 5+ Ward Save against spells.

Dark Elf (Dunmer)

Ashborn: Dunmer have Feel No Pain against attacks that deal flame damage.

Ancestral Guardian: At the beginning of the game, after all deployment, including Infiltrators and Scout re-deployment, mark each unit in which the majority of the models are Dunmer. Each of those units may re-roll any d6 that it chooses once per game, provided that the majority of the models in that unit are still Dunmer.

High Elf (Altmer)

Highborn: At the beginning of each of your turns, immediately after Power Dice Pools are replenished, add 1 extra Power Die to the pool of each Altmer in your army. For Altmer with at least 4 Mg, add 2 Power Dice instead.

Weakness: All Elemental damage re-rolls failed wounds against Altmer, unless that Altmer is completely immune to that element.

Imperial

Emperor's Strategy: An army where the majority of models are Imperials wins ties on the roll to go first, chooses the scenario should it roll a 6 to pick table edge, and steals the initiative on 5+.

Khajiit

Eye of Night: Khajiit have the Night Eye special rule(see page XX)

Claws: If a Khajiit chooses not to equip any items or spells in one or more of its hands, that hand counts as a Hand Weapon that may be dual wielded with another claw or fist weapon. It may not be used to Parry with a shield, however.

Nord

Blood of the North: Nords have Feel No Pain against attacks that deal frost damage.

Battle Cry: At the beginning of the game, after all deployment, including Infiltrators and Scout re-deployment, mark each unit in which the majority of the models are Nords. If a unit thus marked is tied in close combat, provided the majority of the unit is still Nords, that unit counts as having won the combat by 0 points instead; the enemy must test accordingly.

Orc

The Cursed: Orcs gain +1 to their Ward Save against all spells. If they do not already have a Ward Save, this ability grants them a 6+ Ward Save against spells.

Berserk: At the beginning of the game, after all deployment, including Infiltrators and Scout re-deployment, mark each unit in which the majority of the models are Orcs. Once per game, you may have each unit marked thus become Frenzied, provided the majority of the models are still Orcs.

Redguard

Adrenaline Rush: Redguards that charge(or counter-attack) gain +2 Attacks and +1 WS the first round of combat instead of their normal +1 attack charge bonus. In addition to this, their charge bonus continues into the second round of combat: Redguards gain a charge bonus of +1 Attack if they charged or counter-attacked the previous round in the same melee combat.

Wood Elf (Bosmer)

Light Feet: Bosmer have the Stealth special rule.

Beast Tongue: At the beginning of the game, after all deployment, including Infiltrators and Scout re-deployment, mark each unit in which the majority of the models are Bosmer. Models with the Bestial Instinct special rule Fear units marked this way, provided the majority of the models are still Bosmer.

Other Races[edit]

Certain less common, strange or arcane races and types of creatures exist in Tamriel.

Daedra

Immortal: Daedra are not mortals. They have Eternal Warrior, and cannot be affected by disease.

Otherworldly Beings: Daedra have the Ethereal and Fearless special rules.

Undead

Undead are Fearless.

Lumbering Walk: Undead cannot March, and are Fearless.

Unburdened by Life: Undead have Feel No Pain, Immune to Poison, and are unaffected by disease. They are not mortals.

Vampire

All Vampires are considered Undead. However, they have the following differences:

Mortal Appearance: Vampires can March, are not Fearless, and do not have Feel No Pain. A model may be both a Vampire and another race.

Power of the Night: Vampires have many abilities, spells and special rules specific to their profiles or to their entries in army books unavailable to other models.

Tyranny of the Sun: During the day, all Vampires outside of area terrain or buildings have -1 Toughness and cannot benefit from Regenerate. They get no charge bonuses during the day of any kind, and only replenish half of whatever amount of Power Dice they would otherwise replenish at the start of a daytime turn. Flame weapons always get +1 to wound against Vampires.

Dragon

Sons of Akatosh: Dragons have the Eternal Warrior special rule and are unaffected by disease. They are not mortals. In addition, they may only be Soul Trapped by another Dragon or by a Dragonborn, and cannot be Silenced.

Serpentine Form: Dragons are Flyer Monstrous Creatures, and cannot carry/hold wargear, other than the natural weapons and armor granted by their draconic form.

Tongues of the Thu'um: Dragons always have the Tongue special rule, and automatically pass the Leadership test required to use Shouts.

Rulers of the Sky: Dragons have the Hit and Run and Fearless universal special rules, and cause Terror.

Automaton

Form of Brass: Automatons are Fearless, are unaffected by disease, and are Immune to Frost and Poison. Shock damage ignores the armor saves of Automatons, and gets +1 to wound against them. Automatons are not mortals.

Mechanical: Automatons cannot be affected by Blind, Chill, Paralyze, Silence or Command effects, or Illusion spells an opponent controls, unless a special rule specifically allows it.

Sload

Dread Sorcerers: Sloads get +1 to all attempts at casting spells.

Stoic Deliberation: At the beginning of the game, after all deployment, including Infiltrators and Scout re-deployment, mark each unit in which the majority of the models are Sloads. As long as the majority of the models in a unit marked in this way are Sloads, that unit is Stubborn, and may choose to automatically fail any Morale test if it so desires.

Snow Elf(Falmer)

Falmer that retain their noble form use the following special rules:

Wisdom of the Snow Princes: At the beginning of each of your turns, immediately after Power Dice Pools are replenished, add 1 extra Power Die to the pool of each non-corrupted Falmer in your army.

Falmer that retain their noble form have Arkay's Protection(see above)

Falmer that have fallen to a corrupted form at the hands of the dwarves use the following special rules:

The Sightless: Corrupted Falmer have no eyes, and therefore are completely unaffected by Blind affects: they're already blind, and are used to it! However, cover saves may always be taken against Ranged Attacks by Falmer as if Night Fighting was active, and Falmer, cannot shoot at a unit more than 36" away from their unit. Note that these Night Fighting effects on Falmer always apply, even if an effect would take away the Night Fighting status from a unit, or allow a unit to ignore Night Fighting, and are unmodifiable.

Ages Underground: Corrupted Falmer have the Acute Senses special rule, and are immune to Fear, Terror and Panic.

Heartland High Elf(Ayleid)

Ayleid models use the same rules as Altmer(see above)

Ayleids have Arkay's Protection(see above)

Frost Spirit

Elemental Essence: Frost Spirits are Fearless and do not have to roll for difficult and dangerous terrain. They are not mortals.

Icy Form: Frost Spirits are unaffected by Frost damage or disease, and cannot be Chilled, but Flame damage gets +1 to wound against them.

Guardian Stone Blessings[edit]

The signs in the heavens that watch over Tamriel guide the fates of mortals. Some mortals are blessed with strange portents, aligned to whatever stars they were born under. Others are blessed by a certain star after encountering mysterious standing stones deep in the wilderness. Whatever their source, these blessings are found on many figures of importance. Most armies will be able to purchase one of these abilities as an upgrade for each of their characters.

Blessing of the Warrior

Those blessed by the Warrior have great skill in battle. This model has +1 WS.

Blessing of the Steed

Those blessed by the Steed are swift and tireless, yet afflicted by wanderlust. This model is not Encumbered by Heavy Armor(see page XX). If this model does not use Heavy Armor, he has the Fleet of Foot special rule instead.

Blessing of the Lord

Those blessed by the Lord have the blood of warrior kings, tempered by the curse of trolls. This model has Regeneration(6+). However, Flame damage gets +1 to wound against him.

Blessing of the Lady

Those blessed by the Lady acquire unprecedented grace, soundness of mind, and nobility. A model blessed by the Lady re-rolls all failed Characteristic Tests, including Leadership Tests; however, if any models in his unit are not blessed by the Lady, Characteristic and Leadership tests taken for the entire unit(including morale checks) are not re-rolled.

Blessing of the Mage

Those blessed by the Mage have great magical potential. This model has +1 Mg.

Blessing of the Apprentice

Those blessed by the Apprentice have a wild and dangerous, yet mighty hold over magicka. At the beginning of each of your turns, immediately after Power Dice Pools are replenished, add 2 extra Power Dice to the pool this model. Spell damage strikes at +2 Strength against this model, however.

Blessing of the Atronach

Those blessed by the Atronach become a conduit for magicka. A model with this blessing begins the game with Power Dice equal to double his Mg, and does not empty his Power Dice Pool at the start of your turn. Instead, his number of Power Dice stays the same (without replenishing, either). If he has less Power Dice than his Mg at the start of your turn, if he would normally replenish Power Dice, he gains a single Power Die instead. If he is affected by a Magicka Drain effect, he immediately loses that many Power Dice, instead of suffering the normal effect. This model has a 4+ ward save against spell damage that cannot be improved or stacked with other Ward Saves, but may be taken instead of other saves. If this save succeeds, this model gain Power Dice equal to the number of Power Dice spent on the spell he made the save against.

Blessing of the Ritual

Those blessed by the Ritual hold ineffable arcane powers within their souls. Once per game, this model may automatically cast any spell he knows that has a casting cost of 8+ or less. No roll is required to cast this spell. The model does not even need to have a spell equipped to cast it, and may cast it even if silenced.

Blessing of the Thief

Those blessed by the Thief are quick and lucky. This model has +1 I.

Blessing of the Lover

Those blessed by the Lover are graceful yet deadly. Enemies in base contact with this model, and enemies in base contact with those enemies, lose their charge bonus.

Blessing of the Shadow

Those blessed by the Shadow are unnaturally hard to find. Once per game, at the beginning of any phase, this model may become Invisible until the start of your next turn, or until he chooses to lose the effect through the normal means.

Blessing of the Tower

Those blessed by the Tower have a strong grasp on the figments of reality. Once per game, this model may re-roll any one d6.

Blessing of the Serpent

Those blessed by the Serpent inherit the strange and deadly powers of the most restless stars in the sky. Once per game, this model may choose to make a non-spell weapon he is using Poisoned(3+) until end of turn. It deals Poisoned damage if he does this, obviously.

Wargear[edit]

This section contains the rules for the various types of weapons, armor and other items a model may be equipped with.

Melee Weapons[edit]

The following is a list of melee weapons that may be found in various armies across Tamriel. Melee weapons are used in close combat, unless specifically stated otherwise. A model must make its attacks in close close combat with any melee weapons that it has equipped, dividing the attacks between multiple equipped melee weapons as its controlling player chooses.

Hand Weapon

Hand Weapons are basic one-handed melee weapons: swords, maces, hatchets, clubs, and the like.

A model using a Hand Weapon strikes in combat normally. Hand Weapons can be dual wielded, being one-handed melee weapons.

Parry: A model wielding a Hand Weapon with a Shield may attempt to Parry. This is covered later, in the Shield rules section(see page XX)

  • Dagger

Daggers a special type of Hand Weapon with two additional special rules:

Assassin's Weapon: If an Invisible model attacks with a Dagger, or a model that charged or counter-attacked this turn and began its charge(or was charged and counter-attacked) in Area Terrain or a building attacks with a Dagger, the Dagger gains the Killing Blow special rule that round.

Easily Overwhelmed: Models with Shields may re-roll failed armor saves and failed attempts to Parry(see page XX) against wounds caused by a Dagger. A Dagger may not be dual wielded except with another Dagger.

Spear

Spears are long-reaching one-handed melee weapons designed for defensive formations of infantry. They can be dual wielded with each other, but not with other classes of weapons.

Phalanx: Models using Spears may fight in 3 ranks, rather than just two, as long as all models in those ranks are armed with Phalanx weapons. In other words, instead of having to be in base contact either with the enemy or a friendly model in base contact with the enemy in order to fight, a model with a Spear can fight in close combat if it is in base contact with a friendly model with Phalanx that is in base contact with a third friendly model with Phalanx, who is in base contact with the enemy.

Wall of Death: Attacks with a Spear get +1 Strength +1 AP against charging or counter-attacking Cavalry.

Halberd

Halberds and Poleaxes require two hands, and strike with +1 Strength.

Phalanx: Halberds count as Phalanx weapons(see rules for Spears above); however, they themselves cannot fight in extra ranks.

Wall of Death: Attacks with Halberds and Poleaxes get +1 Strength +1 AP against charging or counter-attacking Cavalry.

Pike

Pikes require two hands and are Phalanx weapons(see rules for Spears above).

Heavy Phalanx: Models using Pikes may fight in 3 ranks, rather than just two, as long as all models in those ranks are armed with Phalanx weapons(see rules for Spears above). Models armed with Pikes may fight in both the 3rd and 4th ranks instead, as long as out of the three models counted for Phalanx between them and the enemy, the closest two models to them are also armed with Pikes. The models in actual base contact with the enemy need not be armed with Phalanx weapons in this case, as long as the three ranks counted behind them are armed with Pikes.

Wall of Death: Attacks with Pikes get +2 Strength +2 AP against charging or counter-attacking Cavalry and charging or counter-attacking Monstrous Cavalry.

Great Weapon

Great Weapons are massive, two-handed weapons wielded by the strongest of warriors. There are three types of Great Weapons normally available to models:

  • Greatsword

Greatswords strike with +1 Strength, and have the Critical Strike and Unwieldy special rules

  • Battle Axe

Battle Axes strike with +2 Strength, and have the Unwieldy special rule

  • War Hammer

War Hammers strike with +2 Strength, +2 AP, and have the Very Unwieldy special rule

Lance

A Lance is a one-handed melee weapon that can never be dual wielded. If the model armed with a Lance is mounted, the Lance strikes with +2 Strength +2 AP when charging or counter-attacking

Shooting Weapons[edit]

Every shooting weapon has a profile. This profile includes its range in inches. If it has two numbers for its range, the first is its minimum range and the second its maximum range. If the weapon's range is given as "Template", then the weapon fires using the teardrop-shaped template (see page XX).

A weapon can be noted as being Blast, Barrage, or any other of a number of special rules in its profile. The Strength and AP given are the Strength and AP at which it strikes.

Models with ranged weapons are assumed to have enough ammunition to last the battle.

Firing Modes:

There are three Firing Modes a weapon can have. The number following the Firing Mode indicates how many shots are fired by the weapon each time it shoots.

Move or Fire:

These weapons cannot be fired by a unit that moved during the movement phase. If they are fired, the unit firing them cannot charge this turn. A unit that marched or charged the previous turn cannot Stand and Shoot with a Move or Fire weapon.

Move and Fire:

These weapons can be fired by a unit that moved during the movement phase. However, the unit that fires them cannot charge this turn.

Fire and Charge:

These weapons can be fired by a unit that moved during the movement phase, and the unit that fires them can charge the same turn.

The following is a list of common Shooting weapons found in Tamriel:

Short Bow

S3 AP0, Move and Fire 2, Range 18". Volley Fire. Two Hands.

Long Bow

This profile includes any weapon merely described as a "Bow"

S3 AP0, Move and Fire 1, Range 30". Volley Fire. Two Hands.

Crossbow

S4 AP1, Move and Fire 1, Range 24". Two Hands. If a Crossbow is fired, it becomes Move or Fire 1 until the end of the controlling player's next turn, to represent the difficulty of quickly reloading it.

Throwing Weapon

This includes throwing knives, throwing axes, and the like.

The Strength of this weapon equals the Strength of the model throwing it. AP0. Fire and Charge 2, Range 6". Throwing weapons act as Hand Weapons in close combat.

Javelin

The Strength of this weapon equals the Strength of the model throwing it plus 1. AP0. Fire and Charge 1, range 9". Javelins act as Hand Weapons in close combat, except that may be dual wielded with Spears, but not with Daggers.

Weapon Quality[edit]

Certain Weapons are of a higher quality than others. Often this is represented through the Master-Crafted rule; at other times, the very material they are made of is so far superior that they gain bonuses in addition to their other rules and characteristics.

Silver

Silver weapons are Otherworldly, and re-roll failed to wound rolls against Werewolves.

Elven

Elven weapons strike at +1 AP.

Glass

Glass weapons strike at +2 AP.

Ebony

Ebony weapons strike at +1 Strength.

Bound

Bound weapons strike at +1 Strength +1 AP, and are Otherworldly.

Daedric

Daedric weapons strike at +2 Strength +2 AP, and are Otherworldly.

Whenever Weapon Quality upgrades are presented in an army book, they may be bought simultaneously for both, for the price of just one, for a pair of weapons with identical base stats(before any other upgrades) that can be dual wielded.

Armour[edit]

There are many types of Armour used for protecting the warriors of Tamriel. A model may only have one suit of armour, or one set of unarmored clothing.

A model wearing unarmored clothing is considered to not be wearing armour. Models whose armour is a natural part of their bodies, or who are not mentioned as wearing armour, are not considered to be wearing armour for the purposes of the armour rules.

There are two types of armour, Light and Heavy.

  • A model wearing either Light or Heavy Armour is considered to have Weakened Magicka. The result of each Power Die that model rolls in attempting to cast a spell is reduced by 1, to a minimum of 1. This represents the awkwardness of using magic while essentially covered head to toe in solid metal.
  • A model wearing Heavy Armour is Encumbered. An Encumbered model considers all 6's rolled when determining charge range or Sweeping Advance to be 5.

The common types of armour, and the armour save they provide are as follows:

Light Armour

  • Any armour listed as "Light Armour" without giving an armour save value provides a 6+ save
  • Chitin, Leather, Light Mail, and Fur armour grant a 6+ save
  • Scaled Mail and Elven armour grant a 5+ save
  • Glass and Mithril armour grant a 4+ save

Heavy Armour

  • Any armour listed as "Heavy Armour" without giving an armour save value provides a 5+ save
  • Hardened Chitin, Chainmail, Plate, and Dwarven armour grant a 5+ save
  • Full Plate and Orcish armour grant a 4+ save
  • Ebony armour grants a 3+ save
  • Daedric armour grants a 2+ save

Shields[edit]

Shields are not considered to be part of a model's armour, but as an equippable item: whether or not you have a shield in your hand is what determines if it protects you! Therefore, using a shield does not alter whether or not a model is considered armoured, but instead grants certain abilities to the model:

A Shield is a one-handed item, that, while equipped, adds +1 to a model's armour save(or grants it a 6+ armour save, if it has no other armoured protection).

Parry:

Whenever a model with both a Hand Weapon and a Shield equipped suffers an unsaved wound in close combat, it may attempt to Parry. This represents the skillful use of weapons to ward off enemy attacks. In order for a model to Parry, the following conditions must be met:

  • The attack being parried must be a melee attack made in the close combat phase.
  • The model must have both a shield and a Hand Weapon equipped. Only a true Hand Weapon can be used to Parry: Daggers cannot be used to Parry, and nor can Hand Weapons that are also Spells, or ranged weapons permitted to count as Hand Weapons(such as javelins).
  • A wound from a spell may not be Parried, nor may an attack be Parried if it is from a model with more than twice the WS of the model attempting to Parry
  • Attacks from Monstrous Creatures can only be Parried by other Monstrous Creatures, should they be armed with a Hand Weapon and Shield

If the following conditions are met, before removing the model, roll a D6 each time an unsaved Wound is suffered(this is not a saving throw). On a 5 or less, you must take the Wound as normal. On a 6, the unsaved Wound is discounted - treat it as having been saved!

Other Items[edit]

Many other items can grant benefits to a model.

Worn Items

Certain items may be displayed on a model, but only have rules apart from that model's clothes or armour if they have an exceptional ability. These items may be purchased by models, even when those models are required to only purchase items they could exchange an item in their possession for, or only purchase items of a type that they already have access to. Other restrictions to their purchase still apply, however, and a model may only have one one of each of these types of items. Wearing these items does not alter whether or not a model is considered armoured. These items include:

  • Amulet
  • Ring
  • Helm
  • Gauntlets
  • Belt
  • Boots

Consumables[edit]

Certain small items are carried by a model to be used once per game. These items are listed as "Consumables" in their respective army lists. Almost all Consumables are either considered Scrolls or Potions.

Scrolls

Each Scroll has a spell written on it. If a model has two hands with spells equipped, that model may choose to use a Scroll that he has available, either in his wargear or granted to him by a special ability. If that model does this, that model automatically casts the spell written on the Scroll without having to roll. The Scroll's power is then used up, and it is removed from the game.

Potions

At the start of each player turn,unless stated otherwise in the rules, a model may choose to drink a single Potion, if he has one available, either in his wargear or granted to him by a special ability. If that model does this, he is immediately effected by the Potion's ability. The Potion is then removed from the game, having been drunk to the bottom of the flask. Even if a Potion can be used at a different time than at the start of the turn, only one Potion can ever be drunk per turn by a model.

The rules for other consumables will be given in their respective army books.

Magic Items[edit]

Certain items have wondrous magical properties. Magic Items can be bought as upgrades at times to regular items, or as replacements. Either way, Magic Items always retain the type, rules and quality of their base item, only adding on additional rules, unless specifically stated to do otherwise.

A weapon that is a Magic Item is a Magic Weapon. It deals Magic Damage, replacing Mundane or Otherworldly in its base item rules.

Artifacts

Certain items are so legendary, rare, and powerful that there is nothing like them in the world. They have become the stuff of myth. An item that is an Artifact is always also a Magic Item, unless stated otherwise. Since they are so unique, an army may only contain one of each Artifact.

Some Artifacts are listed as "Daedric Artifacts". These count as Artifacts as well; this differentiation is only for a certain few special rules.

The Artifacts of Tamriel supplement provides a list of Tournament-legal Artifacts that may be used by the great heroes of many different armies. Every Army Book also contains a list of its own Artifacts, unique to that particular army. Whichever Artifacts are used, they are capable of incredible power, greatly changing the course of the game.

The Power of the Thu'um[edit]

The Thu'um is a form of divine magic used primarily by Dragons, although many humans are capable of using it as well. Using the Thu'um involves attempting to use one of the Shouts that a model may possess.

Every Shout has an effect, a time at which it may be used, and a cooldown.

If a model wishes to use a Shout, first check to see if it has a Cooldown counter on it. If it has such a counter, it may not use the Shout.

If the model does not have a cooldown counter on it, then that model takes a Leadership Test on its own value. This is called a Shout Test. If it passes(which it does automatically if it is a Dragon or a Dragonborn), the Shout is resolved.

Shouts that involve rolls to wound count as dealing Magical damage. Shouts that are shooting attacks count as Magical shooting attacks, except using a Shout Test instead of using Power Dice. Shouts may always be used regardless of what a model is currently equipped with: after all, their reality-warping energies come forth from the mouth, not from the hands!

Broken Concentration:

If a model other than a Dragon or a Dragonborn fails a Shout Test, his mental concentration on the Way of the Voice is broken. He may not attempt to Shout again for the remainder of the game.

Cooldown:

As a Shout is resolved, place a number of Cooldown counters on the Shouting model equal to the Cooldown number in the Shout's profile. At the beginning of each of your turns, at the same time the Magicka is replenished, remove a Cooldown counter from each model that has one. When the final Cooldown counter is removed, the model is free to Shout again!

If a Shout's cooldown is listed as "Resets Next Turn", place a single Cooldown counter on the model that used the Shout. That counter is removed at the start of the following player turn, regardless of whose turn it is.


List of Shouts[edit]

The following is a list of common Shouts available to several of the armies in Scrollhammer. Additional Shouts may be found in various army books.


FUS RO DAH!

- Force - Balance - Push -

Unrelenting Force: A silent shockwave flies forth from the hero's tongue, blasting away everything that it touches.

This Shout may be used at any time. If user is not in close combat, move another unit not locked in combat within 6" directly away from user d3". That unit must take a dangerous terrain test if it hits dangerous terrain. A unit never be moved more than 6" per turn due to Unrelenting Force. If user is in close combat, select a model in base contact with him. That model strikes last this round of combat.

Cooldown 1.


ZUN HAAL VIIK!

- Weapon - Hand - Defeat -

Disarm: The hero commands his foe's weapon to fly out of his hand, leaving him vulnerable as he dives to reclaim his blade.

This Shout may be used during the Close Combat phase by a model locked in close combat. Select a model in base contact with user. That model loses his charge bonus this round if he has one, unless he is using a Spell melee weapon. He takes an Initiative test. If he fails, he may not attack at all this round of combat with non-Spell melee weapons.

Cooldown 1.


BEX MAH MIRAAD!

- Gate - Fall - Doorway -

Thunderous Siege: The Tongue commands a mortal gate to open. A blinding blast issues forth as the Thu'um is exhaled, shattering walls and ripping out bolts. Not even the gates of the mightiest fortress can long withstand the power of the Voice.

This Shout may be activated and fired as a Shooting attack targeting an enemy unit in range, with the following profile: S2, ignores armor saves, Assault 1, Template, rolls 4d6 for armor penetration against Buildings.

Cooldown 3 (Cooldown 1 for Dragons).


YOL TOOR SHUL!

- Fire - Inferno - Sun -

Fire Breath: The hero invokes the famed power of the Dragons against his foe, exhaling an inferno: flames spew forth from his mouth in a molten jet as he breathes the ancient words, burning all in their path to ashes.

This Shout may be activated and fired as a Shooting attack targeting an enemy unit in range, with the following profile: S6 AP2, Assault 1, Template, flame, Multiple Wounds(d3).

Cooldown 3 (Cooldown 1 for Dragons).


FO KRAH DIIN!

- Frost - Cold - Freeze -

Frost Breath: The hero exhales shards of ice and a wind of unfathomable cold from his mouth, tearing apart his enemies' freezing flesh.

This Shout may be activated and fired as a Shooting attack targeting an enemy unit in range, with the following profile: S6 AP2, Assault 1, Template, frost, models hit strike at Initiative 1 this turn.

Cooldown 3 (Cooldown 1 for Dragons).


IIZ SLEN NUS!

- Ice - Flesh - Statue -

Ice Form: The hero commands its foes to turn to freeze solid in place. As they cringe before his breath, they are transformed into frozen statues. Their foes descend upon them, shattering the blanket of ice to bring them a painful death.

This Shout may be activated during your Shooting phase. Target unit within 18" and LOS becomes pinned, and is hit automatically and is reduced to Initiative 1, until the beginning of your next turn or the phase after any form of attack hits the unit.

Cooldown 3.


KRII LUN AUS!

- Kill - Leech - Suffer -

Marked for Death: An enemy of the warrior becomes shrouded in darkness, screaming in pain as an aura of doom engulfs him. His strongest armor corrodes as the death consumes him, the primal mark of slaughter invoked by the Thu'um.

This Shout may be activated during your Shooting phase. Select an enemy model within 12" and LOS. Until the beginning of your next turn, at the beginning of every phase, that model suffers a Spell damage wound with Ignores Cover on a d6 5+. At the beginning of every phase, his armor save is reduced by -1 until the beginning of your next turn(this effect is cumulative).

Cooldown 1.


VEY TUZ KINZON!

- Cut - Blade - Sharp -

Razor Edge: The power of the Thu'um sharpens its wielder's weapon. The weapon slashes through the toughest armor and flesh as if it were butter.

This Shout may be activated during the Close Combat phase. User strikes at +5 AP this round. If his attacks are already at least AP5, he also strikes with +1 Strength this round.

Cooldown 1.


FAAS RU MAAR!

- Fear - Run - Terror -

Dismay: The Tongue commands the power of fear against his foes. All who stand in his presence feel an eerie horror and blackness consume them, a blinding urge to flee and never return.

This Shout may be activated during your Shooting phase. Select a unit within 6" and LOS of user. That unit must pass a Morale Check or flee. If it is fleeing from combat, a Sweeping Advance may be attempted as normal.

Cooldown 1.


ZUL MEY GUT!

- Voice - Fool - Far -

Throw Voice: The Tongue makes this Shout to throw the sound of the Shout itself elsewhere, in an attempt to distract, confuse or fool his foe.

This Shout may be activated during your opponent's Close Combat phase. If your opponent's models would have to make a difficult terrain test to charge user's unit this round, and every other model in user's unit(if any) have also used this Shout, the charging enemy must re-roll all rolls of 5 or better on their Charge Range roll. Monstrous Creatures do not get this bonus unless they are at least 50% concealed from the enemy. In stealth related scenarios, this Shout may be altered and given special rules for helping user's unit avoid detection.

Cooldown: Resets Next Turn.


RAAN MIR TAH!

- Animal - Allegiance - Pack -

Animal Allegiance: The Tongue commands all the beasts of the wilds to come to his aid in battle. Horses throw their masters, wolves and ravens prey upon unsuspecting warriors.

This Shout may be activated during the Close Combat phase by a model in close combat. You may choose to target a model with Bestial Instinct: until the end of the next round of combat(or until user or the target are no longer in this combat), Command a model with Bestial Instinct either in base contact with user, or in base contact with another model in base contact with user. You may choose instead to target a Cavalry model: the rider must pass a Ld test on his own value. If he fails, he may not attack until the end of the next round of combat(or until user or the target are no longer in this combat), and takes a S3AP0 hit.

Cooldown 1.


KAAN DREM OV!

- Kyne - Peace - Trust -

Kyne's Peace: The hero embraces the aspect of Kynareth within the Thu'um, bringing forth a calming wind upon the wilds. The instincts of all beasts near it fall flat, their ravenous urges tamed at his will.

This Shout may be activated during the Close Combat phase. Models that have Bestial Instinct in units within 6" of caster may not charge any unit, and or make attacks in close combat against user's unit this phase. If they would flee this phase, they are destroyed instead.

Cooldown 2.


LOK VAH KOOR!

- Sky - Spring - Summer -

Clear Skies: The Tongue invokes the beauty of spring and the warmth of summer to fall upon the plain of battle. Mists vanish, and clouds part to reveal the glowing rays of the sun.

This Shout may be activated at any time. All Weather effects are ignored this turn within 12" of user.

Cooldown: Resets Next Turn.


SU GRAH DUN!

- Air - Battle - Grace -

Elemental Fury: The Tongue commands the winds to harmonize with his strikes, his weapon cleaving the foe asunder with impossible speed and grace. In a blink of an eye, he fights with impossible ferocity.

This Shout may be activated during the Close Combat phase by a model in close combat. User gets +2 attacks this round.

Cooldown 1.


WULD NAH KEST!

- Vortex - Fury - Tempest -

Whirlwind Sprint: The hero commands a mighty whirlwind to form in the air, to carry him forward towards the foe.

This Shout may be activated during your Shooting phase if marching. User(but not other models in his unit) may march an additional 3" this phase, ignoring both difficult and dangerous terrain.

Cooldown 1.


VEN MUL RIIK!

- Wind - Strong - Gale -

Tempest Shroud: The warrior calls upon the great winds to aid him in battle. Thick torrents of rain and biting winds scour the field.

This Shout may be activated during your movement phase. Weather effect. Shooting Weapons get -1 to hit until the beginning of your next turn. Alternatively, if battle is taking place in a realm other than Nirn, where rain is impossible, Night Fighting rules apply until the beginning of your next turn instead(this rule is for optional use as part of a scenario).

Cooldown: 2


STRUN BAH QO!

- Storm - Wrath - Lightning -

Storm Call: Thunderclouds form above, as the Tongue commands them to unleash their lightning upon all who do battle below. Incredible destruction rains down, smiting friend and foe alike.

This Shout may be activated during your movement phase. Weather effect. Until the beginning of your next turn, at the start of every phase, roll a d6 for each unit within 36" of user, as well as all units of Flyers. On a 4+ that unit takes a S7 AP6, Blast, Shock hit with Magicka Drain(total). These Blast templates may be placed cover one's own models(and certainly will if one's own units are hit!), and are placed by the opponent of the controller of the unit being hit. They cannot be placed so that they cover user, however. Cover saves are taken as if the attack was coming from directly above. Units completely obscured from directly above are not hit.

Cooldown 4.


SU'UM THU'UM DIIVON!

Swallow Shout: The Tongue inhales as his rival sends forth a Thu'um, challenging his foe's power and commanding it to be no more.

This Shout may be activated in response to an enemy Shout being used within 24". Choose a number "X" between 1 and 5, add d6, and then add it to user's Ld. Your opponent adds the cooldown number of his Shout being targeted, +d6, to the Ld of its source model. If user's result is higher than that of your opponent's model, your opponent's Shout is countered(its Cooldown is still in effect, however).

Cooldown X.


LAAS YAH NIR!

- Life - Seek - Hunt -

Aura Whisper: A Thu'um is released not in the form of a Shout, but of a Whisper. The energies of all objects surrounding the hero shine bright as stars to his eyes, no matter how well concealed their physical forms might be.

This Shout may be activated during your Shooting Phase. Enemy models other than Undead and Automatons within 12" of user do not get cover saves from user's unit this phase.

Cooldown 1.


FEIM ZII GRON!

- Fade - Spirit - Bind -

Become Ethereal: The hero calls upon the void to shield himself. His physical form become as air before the blades of those who seek to slay him.

This Shout may be activated at any time(this includes in response to user being hit, wounded, or failing a save). User immediately cancels all attacks, shooting attacks and spells he makes in this phase. User may ignore a single wound of any type against him this phase.

Cooldown 1.


FIIK LO SAH!

- Mirror - Deceive - Phantom -

Spectral Illusion: The Tongue creates a mirror image of himself, confusing his enemy and misdirecting his attacks.

This Shout may be activated at any time. For the duration of this turn, whenever user is hit by anything other than a template or blast marker, roll a d6. On a 4+, that attack counts as having missed.

Cooldown 2.


TIID KLO UL!

- Time - Sand - Eternity -

Slow Time: The hero orders the frame of the universe to warp to his will through the power of the gods: his Thu'um commands time itself to bend around it. In what seems to them to be a single second, the routs his foes with ease.

This Shout may be activated at any time. During this phase, user may add d6" to his move, march, or charge(but not that of his unit). In addition, he rerolls all failed hits and wounds, and all failed cover saves and Parry attempts.

Cooldown 2.


DAAN JOT WULD!

- Doom - Maw - Vortex -

Maelstrom: The hero tears a hole in the fabric of reality with its breath, and Shouts his foe into the maw of Oblivion itself. From there, certain death awaits him, at the fiery hands of horrors from beyond the realm of Nirn.

This shout may be activated during the assault phase. Select a model other than a Dragon, Dragonborn or Physical God in base contact with user. That model suffers Magicka Drain(total), and must pass an Initiative test or be immediately removed as a casualty.

Cooldown 3.

Leaders of Your Army[edit]

Characters[edit]

In Scrollhammer, particularly powerful, heroic individuals are called 'characters'.

Character Types

Most characters are fielded in units from the start of the game, and represent leaders or champions, such as an Imperial Legion Centurion. Characters have their own profiles, but do not have a separate entry. They are effectively just another warrior in their unit, with enhanced characteristics and perhaps a wider selection of weapons and wargear choices. Other characters fight as units on their own: they are either mighty, or feared enough by their own kind, that they don't take to the battlefield with other warriors.

Regardless of their potency, all follow the rules for characters.

Independent Characters

Some characters have the Independent Character special rule, which allows them to join other units (see page XX).

Characters as Leaders

Remember that a unit's Leadership tests are taken using the highest Leadership value in the unit (see page XX). As characters normally have a better leadership than other warriors, this means that they make very good leaders for units in your army.

Characters and Moving

Characters follow the movement rules for models of their type, whether Infantry, Flyer Infantry, Cavalry, etc. However, remember that they must maintain unit coherency with any unit they are in (see page XX).

Characters and Shooting

Characters shoot just like ordinary models of their type, although they sometimes have a better Ballistic Skill or an arcane weapon that sets them apart. If the character is in a unit, roll for him separately or use different coloured dice to differentiate his shots. He must shoot at the same target as the unit he is in.

Characters have the Precision Shots special rule(see page XX).

Characters and Close Combat

Remember, a character that has joined a unit follows all the normal rules for being part of a unit. If a character is in a unit that charges into close combat, the character charges too, as it is part of the unit. If the character's unit is locked in close combat, he fights as part of the unit - either roll for him separately or use different coloured dice to differentiate his Attacks. Attacks are made and Wounds allocated just as with normal melee fighting - the character cannot be singled out.

If, when it is a character's turn to make a Pile In move, other friendly models are piling in at the same time, the character must move as soon as it is able, to get into the fight! If this is not possible, then replace as many friendly non-character models in the same unit as necessary with the character(depending on the size of the Character's base), placing those same models as you wish where the character previously was(switching places)- characters yearn to reach the forefront of the battle at all costs!

Characters have the Precision Strikes special rule(see page XX).

Challenges[edit]

Issuing a Challenge

Challenges are issued between the Charge and Fight sub-phases, before any blows are struck. Only one challenge can be issued per close combat - the side whose turn it is has the opportunity to issue a challenge first. If that side chooses not to, then the other side can issue a challenge.

To issue a challenge, nominate a character in one of your units locked in the combat to be the challenger. We can then assume he's issued a suitably insulting challenge to the foe, probably impugning their courage, battle skill, heritage, devotion to questionable gods and overall slovenly aspect. You'll now have to wait and see whether a character amongst the enemy ranks chooses to step forwards and accept the challenge.

Once one challenge has been made, no further challenges can be issued in that combat whilst the previous challenge is ongoing. Obviously, if there are no characters in the enemy units, then a challenge cannot be issued. Characters that cannot fight or strike blows (including those that are not engaged with an enemy model) cannot issue challenges.

Accepting a Challenge

If your opponent has issued a challenge, you can now accept it - nominate one of the characters in your unit to be the challengee. Your opponent has probably decided which of your characters he wants to fight, in fact, this bias might affect how the challenge was framed ('the brave Thane Wulfred challenges thine foul Sorcerer to single combat!'), but the final choice is yours - ruleswise he can't challenge a specific enemy, he just issues a challenge to the foe at large and sees who steps forwards. Characters that cannot fight or strike blows (including those that are not engaged with an enemy model) cannot accept challenges.

Refusing a Challenge

Alternatively, you can simply refuse the challenge and choose to have your character slink away with sullied honour but beating heart(s). If you refuse, your opponent gets to nominate one of your characters from those that could have accepted. The chosen model cannot strike blows at all this turn, as he is thereafter putting all of his effort into staying clear of the vengeful enemy character. Furthermore, his Leadership cannot be used by the rest of the unit for the remainder of the phase - skulking amongst the ranks is not the stuff of heroism!

Once a challenge has been refused, the model that issued it fights normally.

Heroic Stand

A unit that consists only of a single character cannot refuse a challenge. He's got nowhere to hide.

Fighting a Challenge

If a challenge has been accepted, it is time to move the two combatants into base contact with each other. Note that these moves cannot be used to move a character out of unit coherency.

If possible, swap the challenger for one or more friendly models(however many are needed for the swap) in base contact with the challengee. If this cannot be done, swap the challengee for one or more friendly models(however many are needed for the swap) in base contact with the challenger. If neither of these moves would result in the two models being in base contact,'swap' the challenger to as close as possible to the challengee and assume the two to be in base contact for the purposes of the ensuing fight. In case you were wondering, models that are moved to satisfy a challenge are not subject to Difficult or Dangerous Terrain tests. Wounds allocated to a character in a challenge cannot be reallocated by the Look Out, Sir! rule(see Precision special rule for details on page XX). For the duration of the challenge, these two models are considered to be in base contact only with each other.

Combatant Slain

When one of the combatants in a challenge is slain, regardless of which Initiative step it is, the challenge is still considered to be ongoing until the end of the phase.

Outside Forces

Whilst the challenge is ongoing, only the challenger and challengee can strike blows against one another. Wounds from other attackers cannot be allocated against either character - simply resolve the wound allocation step as if the two characters were not there. Of course, this means a unit fighting an enemy unit consisting of only a single character model will not be able to strike blows at all if that model is in a challenge.

Moral Support

Sometimes, you'll find most of the models in one of your units are reduced to bystanders whilst a challenge plays out the only enemy model still alive is a character, and he's in a challenge!

However, when this occurs, we can happily assume that such bystanders are cheering their leader on, spurring him to redouble his efforts and doing everything they can to dishearten his foe.

If, at the start of any Fight sub-phase, one or more of your units is locked in combat with a single model who is fighting in a challerge, your character receives one re-roll for every five models forced to watch in this manner. These re-rolls can be used on his To Hit rolls, To Wound rolls or saving throws. Any re-rolls not used by the end of the phase are lost.

Close Combat Result

Unsaved Wounds caused in a challenge count towards the close combat result, alongside any unsaved Wounds caused by the rest of the characters' units.

Round Two

If both competitors survive a challenge, and neither side fled from the combat, then they continue to fight in the next round of close combat.

Even though further challenges cannot be issued in a combat until the existing challenge has been resolved, there is the possibility that another character in the fight might intercede in a Glorious Intervention:

Glorious Intervention

The Glorious Intervention rule represents situations where one character hurls himself into harm's way in order to defend another.

A character can declare a Glorious Intervention at the start of his own Fight sub-phase before any blows are struck, if a friendly character in the same combat is about to fight a second or subsequent round of a challenge.

A character cannot declare a Glorious Intervention in the first round of a challenge or during the enemy turn. Nor can a character that cannot fight or strike blows (including those that are not engaged with an enemy model) declare a Glorious Intervention. To see whether or not the Glorious Intervention has been successful, the intervening character must take an Initiative test.

If the test is failed, nothing happens - the character has not been quick enough. He fights the current round of close combat as normal.

If the test is passed, the character making the Glorious Intervention takes the place of the friendly character in the ongoing challenge. The character thus displaced now fights in the close combat according to the normal rules, while the character that made the Glorious Intervention fights in the challenge. The two characters now fighting the challenge should attempt to move into base contact with each other following the same rules as when the challenge was first accepted, with the character performing the Glorious Intervention as the challenger.

Note that, whilst it is possible for several Glorious Interventions to occur within the same challenge over the course of the game, only one character can attempt a Glorious Intervention for each challenge per turn.

Command Groups[edit]

Certain models have abilities that allow them to spur your troops to fight with greater vigor, while not necessarily commanding them(as that is more often the job of characters).

Standard Bearer[edit]

A Standard Bearer is one model in a unit who is nominated to carry a Standard in addition to his other wargear, be it a banner, an icon, or perhaps a pole covered in the heads of slain enemies.

A unit containing a Standard Bearer gets +1 to combat resolution.

Certain unique or Magic Standards may be found in an army book. These are upgrades for the standard that a Standard Bearer carries.

One model per detachment may, as directed by the rules, be considered the Battle Standard Bearer. This model carries the regimental colors of your warriors. He counts as a regular Standard Bearer, but in addition to this, all models in his detachment within 12" of him may use his Leadership value instead of their own.

Musician[edit]

Musicians are models who, in addition to their other wargear, carry drums, fifes, bagpipes, great battle-horns, and the like.

A unit containing a Musician may rally normally even if it is below 50% of its original strength.

A unit containing a Musician automatically passes the Leadership Test required to March within 9" of the enemy.

Battlefield Terrain[edit]

Types of Terrain[edit]

Open Ground

Open ground covers everything from dusty plains to rolling hills. Any area not specifically classed as a type of terrain (such as a building, ruin, forest, river, or unique terrain) is considered to be open ground. Models on open ground are often said to be 'out in the open'. No additional rules are needed and, unless otherwise specified, special rules and abilities that affect terrain do not affect open ground.

Impassable Terrain

The rules for impassable terrain cover those areas of the board that warriors physically cannot enter. Sheer rock faces, magical force barriers, sealed buildings and other unbreachable environs follow the rules for impassable terrain. Models cannot be placed upon, enter, cross or move into or through impassable terrain - they must go around. The exceptions tend to be things like Flyer units, (see page XX). Note that this category is used for terrain that is actually, physically impassable. If you want terrain that is more or less lethal, look to dangerous terrain and lethal terrain, covered later.

Difficult Terrain

Difficult terrain slows down models wishing to move through it, and can sometimes be dangerous to models passing through it. It includes areas of rubble, woods, ruins, brush and scrub, rocky outcrops, boggy ground, low walls, razor wire, barricades, steep hills, streams and other shallow water, as well as terrain features that combine several of these types.

Models moving into, through or out of difficult terrain must take a Difficult Terrain test(see page XX)

The rules for marching and difficult terrain are on page XX.

The rules for charging and difficult terrain are on page XX.

Note that, as part of their move through difficult terrain, models can move through walls, closed doors and windows, and all similarly solid obstacles, unless the players have agreed that a certain wall or obstacle is impassable. It is assumed that as part of their movement they scramble over, smash or open these obstacles.

You should also note that, if you take the Difficult Terrain test, you aren't compelled to move the models, as you might not have rolled high enough to make it worth moving at all.

However, if you roll the dice, the models that were attempting to move are still considered to have moved for the purposes of Shooting.

Dangerous Terrain

Dangerous terrain follows all the rules for difficult terrain - you've got to watch your step! In addition, each model must take a Dangerous Terrain test as soon as it enters, leaves or moves within dangerous terrain.

Once a model has taken a Dangerous Terrain test for a particular area of terrain, it does not test for that area of terrain again in the same phase. However, if the model moves into a different area of dangerous terrain, these must be tested for as normal.

Lethal Terrain

Some locales are so hazardous that to seek ingress is also to invite a nasty death. Lava flows, toxin vats, bottomless ravines, tears in reality and other suitably fatal environs all use the rules for lethal terrain. You'll not need to use the rules for lethal terrain that often - normally you'll find that simply dangerous or impassable terrain will prove quite sufficient. However, sometimes an area of terrain looks so inimical to life and limb that you'll want to define it as lethal for that one in a thousand chance that a unit will blunder into it!

Lethal terrain uses all the normal rules for impassable terrain save that models can never voluntarily end their move on lethal terrain - if a model ends its move on lethal terrain, it is immediately removed as a casualty!

Area Terrain

For the clarity of the game, it is important to be able to tell where the boundary of the terrain feature is. This is where we need to introduce the concept of 'area terrain'.

You can show the boundary of a piece of area terrain by using a flat base board, an outline of lichen or sand, or by painting a slightly different colour on your gaming board. Trees, rocks, ruins, or whatever is appropriate for the kind of area terrain you are representing are usually placed within the boundary of the area terrain's base. When moving models into this area, you can temporarily remove the rocks, trees, etc. (if they are not glued in place) to make moving the models easier. Remember, however, to put them back where they originally were (or as close as possible) after you finish moving, as they can affect the line of sight of models shooting through that area terrain.

Area terrain is always difficult terrain. Models in area terrain receive a cover save, regardless of whether or not they are obscured, based on their Formation type.

Buildings[edit]

Buildings vs Ruins

It's important to note that these rules cover intact buildings rather than ruins. Essentially, if your structure is fully enclosed and has a roof, use the rules presented here. If your structure is merely a collection of ruined walls, then use the ruins rules presented on page XX.

Basics of Buildings

Only Infantry and Beasts can ever enter or charge units inside of buildings.

Building Size

A room is either small, medium or large. A small room is up to 6"x6", and can hold up to 10 models. A medium room is up to 9x9", and can hold up to 20 models. Anything larger is a large room; it can hold up to 30 models.

Rooms may have different Elevations(see page XX)

Fighting Inside Buildings

Models inside Buildings(except on Battlements, see below) have the Counter-Attack special rule and are considered to be in Skirmish Formation for as long as they are inside the Building.

Units inside Buildings are Fearless, but do not have to take No Retreat! wounds.

Units can also charge an enemy that is occupying an adjacent room (including battlements). To charge a unit in a room, simply declare the occupying unit to be the target. The charge is automatically successful: no charge roll is made, and no Stand and Shoot shots can be fired (the attackers are far too close for that). In the ensuing Fight sub-phase, all models in a unit locked in that combat are also engaged in the combat, and therefore fight and strike blows as normal. Neither side can attempt to attack the building itself.

You do not determine melee results in a combat between units in different parts of buildings. Instead, engaged units automatically consolidate back into the building they controlled at the start of the phase. However, if a unit is wiped out, surviving units can choose to consolidate into either the building it occupied at the start of the phase or into the now vacant building.

Impassable Buildings

There are times when a player's collection may include buildings that have no way for warriors to enter. In game terms, we refer to these structures as impassable buildings.

Impassable Buildings and Movement:

If a building is agreed to be impassable at the start of the game, it follows the normal rules for impassable terrain, and models cannot go inside it for any reason. This is not to say that models will not interact with the building - it will still block line of sight and provide cover for models sheltering in its lee.

Occupying Buildings

Models can enter or exit a building, or move from one room to another through a doorway or other opening that the players have agreed to treat as an Access Point. Moving into a Building or a room causes the models to all be considered to be inside one room of the building.

Only one Infantry unit, plus any Independent Characters that have joined them, may occupy a room at one time. The Transport Capacity of a small tower is ten models, while a large hall can hold up to thirty. This can vary according to what you and your opponent agree on before the game begins, but otherwise, the models inside the room cannot exceed its capacity. Models entering a building or a room are removed from the table - either note down where they are on a piece of paper or use another suitable reminder.

Models moving out of a building can move up to 6" out, starting at the Access Point. Models moving into a building, or from room to room, take up the entirety of their movement or march to make the move. A unit in a room is allowed to move through one or more friendly units in rooms to reach a different room past them. Different rooms are treated as separate places for shooting and melee.

Shooting and Buildings

Spells and Shouts may be used within buildings. Other models inside of the same room as a model are always considered to be 0" away as far as abilities are concerned, if those abilities have a given range value. Adjacent rooms are considered to be 6" away, rooms adjacent to those but not to the caster's 12", and so on and so forth.

Some buildings have Fire Points that allow units inside to fire out. These could be the fire slits on bunkers and bastions or the windows on other buildings. Players should agree beforehand where these Fire Points are. Unless the players agree otherwise, up to two models may shoot through each Fire Point of a building. The remainder of the models may not shoot.

Note that all of the models in a unit firing from a building must target a single enemy unit, as normal.

Models inside of Buildings cannot be shot at with non-Template weapons. Template weapons score d6 hits on the unit inside of the room being fired at, as well as hitting the Building itself in the process.

Battlements

Rooms that are open-topped are considered Battlements. Entire units may fire from Battlements, measuring from any edge of the battlement.

Models in Battlements may be fired at; note that whether they are on an upper or lower floor, they count as having an elevation(see Ruins rules on page XX). They have a 3+ cover save from this shooting.

Units on Battlements do not automatically gain Counter-Attack for being in a Building. However, they can Stand and Shoot.

A unit can be placed on a Battlement if all the models can fit there, as models on battlements are shown, not hidden. If it cannot be placed, then it cannot be on the Battlement.

Units on Battlements are not Fearless. If they flee through a building, they must flee through one room at a time for every 4 they would move on their fleeing score. If they become stuck inside a friendly unit, or must go through an enemy unit or impassable terrain, the unit is trapped and destroyed.

Flyer units using their wings can land on Battlements, or directly charge a unit on Battlements.

Attacking Buildings

The easiest way to kill enemy troops in a fortified position is often to destroy the fortified position. Units may shoot at or charge an occupied building and attempt to damage it.

Models that shoot at or charge a building choose a section to fire at; one section of the building exists for each ground floor room and any rooms directly above that room.

Models that charge a building are not locked in combat, but may continue to attack it as long as they are in base contact with it. They hit automatically. A building cannot make a Sweeping Advance, win or lose combat. Even models inside the building can shoot the models attacking the building, if they would be able to normally. Models inside a building, and the building itself, cannot Stand and Shoot.

When rolling to wound against a building, instead roll to penetrate its defenses:

  • Note the Strength of the Weapon rolling against the Building
  • roll a d6 (the "Armour Penetration Roll") and add the two numbers together

If the result is greater than the Armour Value(AV) of the Building, the Building is damaged. Roll on the Building Damage Chart below. If the damaging hit came from a ranged weapon, score a hit from that ranged weapon at -1 S -1 AP on the unit inside the room of the facing of the building.

1: Breach!

The section's armour value is reduced by d3 for the remainder of the battle.

2: Tremor

Units inside the section get -d3 to hit the following turn. Units leaving the building can only move 3" outwards, rather than 6".

3: Partial Collapse

The occupying units suffer d6 S6 AP0 Ignores Cover hits.

4: Structural Collapse

The occupying units suffer 2d6 S6 AP0 Ignores Cover hits. The section's armour value is reduced by d3 for the remainder of the battle.

5: Catastrophic Breach

The section's armour value is reduced by d6 for the remainder of the battle.

6: Total Collapse

The occupying units suffer 2d6 S6 AP0 Ignores Cover hits. They must immediately flee 8" out of the building(even if Fearless) and leave the building, automatically rallying if they were not already fleeing. Any units unable to flee the building are removed as casualties. The building is no longer a building, and becomes area terrain that is both Difficult and Dangerous, with the Ruins terrain type and one floor. Replace the building with a suitable pile of rubble if one is available.

If a Building reaches 0 armour value, it immediately suffers Total Collapse.

Battlements and Building Damage

A unit on the battlements is slightly less prone to harm if the building suffers darnage. They're already on the roof, so that roof can't fall in on them, however, there is still the possibility of injury from shrapnel and so on. Accordingly, if the battlements are damaged, any unit on the battlements suffers the same number of hits as a unit inside a building would, but these are resolved at Strength 3, not Strength 6.

Building Types

Castle Strongpoints usually have an armour value of 20.

Stone Towers usually have an armour value of 18.

Stone Houses usually have an armour value of 13.

Wooden Towers usually have an armour value of 12.

Wooden Houses usually have an armour value of 10.

Other rules for buildings can be supplied as the scenario requires.

What can Hurt a Building?

Flame attacks get +1 on the Damage Chart against Wooden buildings.

Shock attacks get -1 on the Damage Chart against Stone buildings.

Buildings are Immune to Poison and Frost, unaffected by disease, and do not have characteristics other than Armour Value. They cannot move, attack, be involved in Sweeping Advances, or use wargear, magic or shouts in any way. Instant Death cannot occur against buildings.

Buildings do not get cover saves for any reason, other than being at least 50% obscured.

Some buildings may be exceptions to these rules, as a scenario's rules may permit.

Ruins[edit]

Ruins: The Basics

All ruins are difficult area terrain, and so provide a cover save where appropriate.

Players can also agree at the beginning of the game to treat some ruins as dangerous terrain as well, representing unstable structures on the verge of collapsing or that are still on fire. Of course, the nature of ruins means that the boundaries of the terrain can be somewhat indistinct. The best way to counter this is to ensure that both players are clear on the boundaries of each ruin before the game begins.

Coping with Different Heights

With units inside ruins, you will often need to measure weapon ranges between models on different levels and at different heights. Measure the distance from base to base, holding your tape measure at an angle as necessary. Sometimes, a wall of rubble or an exposed stanchion will get in the way and you'll find it difficult, or impossible, to accurately measure the distance. Should this happen, it's more than acceptable to estimate based on what you can measure.

Unit Coherency

When moving, it is possible that models from the same unit may end up spread across two or more levels of a ruin. In this case, the models on different levels maintain unit coherency as long as any part of the body of a model on a lower level is within 6" of the base of a model that is higher up.

This means that you measure up 6" from the head of a model on one level to the base of the model on the next level up, and so on. Players should be generous when measuring for very short models, like swarms) which otherwise may be unable to spread over several levels of a ruin (give them a break - they're only little!).

Moving within Ruins

Only certain troops are capable of clambering to the upper levels of ruins. Accordingly, only Beasts, Infantry, and all types of Flyers- and only if the model can physically be placed there, and the unit does not have the Fight in Ranks formation. Other units may only move on the ground level of the ruin. You should agree with your opponent at the beginning of the game whether or not any other unit types can enter the upper levels of a ruin (Monstrous Creatures could be allowed to enter sturdy looking ruins).

Infantry

Even though different building models vary, the typical distance between levels in a ruin ts 3". A model moving on foot in a ruin therefore needs 3 " of its movement to go up or down a level.

As ruins are difficult terrain, this means that if a 1 or 2 is rolled, a model may not make any vertical movement (but may still move horizontally on its level). If a 3 is rolled, the model can either move up to 3" horizontally or simply go up or down a level without any horizontal movement. If a 4 or 5 is rolled, a model can either move horizontally up to the maximum rolled or go up down a level as well as moving its remaining 1" or 2" horizontally. On a result of 6, the model will be able to go up/down two levels if it does not move horizontally at all, or move one level up/down and horizontally for the remaining 3" or all 6" horizontally.

If the distance between levels in a ruin is not 3", simply measure the distance between the levels to determine how much movement a model requires to move up or down between the them. If the distance between levels is 6", models that wish to ascend or descend that level will only be able to do so on a Difficult Terrain test of a 6,and they will not be able to make any horizontal movement.

If the distance between levels is greater than 6", models cannot ascend the level at all by making a Difficult Terrain test, but Flyers can try to move up (see below).

Flyers

Remember that Flyers are not hindered by difficult terrain, and move over any terrain as part of their move without penalty. Flyers moving into a ruin are simply placed within 12" of their starting point, including on a different level of a ruin.

Windows, Doors, Ladders, and Lateral Thinking

Should troops be able to move through walls if there is no door? That's really down to what you and your opponent decide. It's perfectly acceptable to assume the combatants on both sides have brought plenty of lumber axes, acid potions or naked ferocity to muscle their way through any wall so foolish as to block their path. Indeed, the normal rules for moving through difficult terrain allow you to do just this. Equally you and your opponent could decide before your game that models can only pass from one side of a wall to the other if they walk around, or if there is a door, window, grate or similar handy opening.

The same is true of ascending and descending levels within a ruin. It's just as valid to assume that the combatants should be able to climb the few feet from one floor to the other, as it is to disallow models from climbing higher in a ruin that has no ladders. Just remember that the more involved your rules for ruins are, the longer the game can take.

Template and Blast Weapons

Multi-level ruins require certain conventions and clarifications to ensure that Template, Blast or Large Blast weapons behave in a consistent fashion, and to keep the game moving.

When firing Template, Blast or large Blast weapons at models in a ruin, it can be tricky to physically place the marker or template over the models in question. The best way to gauge which models are actually under the template is to simply hold the template above the entire ruin, and look down through it.

Blast Weapons

When firing a weapon with the Blast or large Blast type into a ruin, declare which floor you are aiming at, and continue. This is called determining Elevation: blasts targeting the Elevation of a certain floor can only hit models on that floor, or on the floor of another ruin or building at the same Elevation(assuming both ruins or buildings have their ground floors at the same height off the tabletop!). Wounds can only be allocated to models on the stated level.

Other models in the target unit that are on different levels cannot have wounds from that shot allocated to them. If a Blast or large Blast weapon scatters, it can still only hit models on the level targeted, though this may be the corresponding level of a nearby ruin. If there is no corresponding level, it instead hits the highest level under the template, and can only wound models on that level. If the blast marker scatters to non-ruin, or open terrain, resolve as normal.

Barrage Weapons

Barrage weapons work by lobbing projectiles high into the air, bringing death upon the enemy from above. The advantage of these indirect fire weapons is that they can be used to engage targets ignoring the limitations of line of sight. They strike the top of the structure, causing debris to fall on the warriors below.

Barrage weapons always strike the highest level that is under the hole in the centre of the marker. Models on lower levels directly beneath the marker are hit, but at -2 S -2 AP for each level down.

Template Weapons

When targeting a unit that is in a ruin, the firing unit must declare which level is being targeted before placing the template. Template weapons can only hit models under the template on a single level. This can be on the same level as the firer, or one level higher or lower.

A Flyer that fires a Template weapon at a unit in a ruin may target models on any single level of the ruin.

Multiple Blast and Template Weapons

If a unit is firing more than one Blast, Large Blast or Template weapon (in any combination), at different levels, you'Il need to resolve them one at a time to ensure Wounds are allocated to the correct level of the ruin. If all such weapons are firing at the same level, you can resolve them all together as normal.

Ruins and Charges

Once an charge begins, both friendly and enemy models can end up scattered all over the ruin. For the sake of simplicity, the same principle described for unit coherency is used to determine which models are engaged in a charge. That is to say, distances between models on different levels are measured between the heads of the models on the lower level to the bases of the models on the upper levels. Therefore, a model is engaged in combat if it is in base contact with one or more enemy models, if it is within base contact with a friendly model in base contact with one or more enemy models on the same level or if it is within 4" of a friendly model in base contact with one or more enemy models on a different level.

In some cases, the ruin might genuinely be unstable or uneven or the space could be very limited on a particular level, making it impossible to move charging models into base contact with the unit they wish to charge. When this happens, it is perfectly acceptable to place models as close to their foe as possible, including the level below or above, providing that you make clear to your opponent which of your models are in base contact with his models. We find that directly below or above works well, representing them charging up or down a flight of stairs.

Other Terrain Types[edit]

Forests

Forests are always difficult terrain. They are usually also area terrain.

Forests grant Cover Saves to models in them if they are Area Terrain, as per the usual rules.

Rivers, Lakes, and Pools

Rivers, lakes and pools are always difficult terrain. Of course, most rivers have at least one place at which they can be crossed, such as a bridge or a ford. Such crossing points are treated as open terrain.

Battlefield Debris

Battlefield debris is difficult terrain.

Swamps and Marshes

Swamps and Marshes are always at least difficult area terrain. In addition to this, all wide expanses of peat and patches of sand within Swamps and Marshes are considered to be dangerous terrain. Marshes without trees or other suitably large pieces of cover cannot grant cover saves of better than 5+.

Boulders

Steep rock formations are difficult terrain. The steepest of them are Impassable terrain; determine what is what beforehand.

Lava

Lava is Difficult Terrain. It is treated as Lethal Terrain by units that are not Immune to Flame.

Tall Grass and Hedges

Tall Grass and Hedges are difficult terrain that cannot grant cover saves of better than 5+. Tall Grass can be area terrain if there is enough of it in one spot.

There are countless other types of difficult terrain, for which the rules are not given here. Rules may be assigned to them as the scenario requires.

Choosing your Army[edit]

Force Organization Chart[edit]

A Force Organization Chart is split into sections: Primary Detachment and Allied Detachment.

Primary Detachments

This section of the Force Organisation chart is reproduced in many army books and is integral to building an army. It dictates the units you can take in the main body of your army. All of the units in your primary detachment must be chosen from the same army book.

Some choices are compulsory, others are optional. The compulsory choices ensure that whatever else you select, your force will have a core within it that is representative of that army. This is rarely a disadvantage and many players often use nothing but Heroes and Core units. Sometimes a single choice on the Force Organisation chart will allow you to select more than one unit or mix units. This will always be explained in the appropriate army book, so be sure to read it carefully.

Primary Detachment:

Heroes:

At least 1 Hero must be taken. Up to 3 Heroes may be taken.

Core:

At least 2 Core units must be taken.

Elite:

0 to 4 Elite units may be taken.

Support:

0 to 4 Support units may be taken.


Allied Detachments

If you wish, your army can include one allied detachment for each primary detachment in your army (normally one, but if you're playing a special scenario it might be more than one).

As with the primary detachment, all units in the allied detachment must be chosen from the same army book, and this must be a different army book than the one used for the primary detachment. The exceptions to this rule are as follows:

  • A Daedra Cult army and a Daedra Army from the Daedra Cults book may ally. Note that a Sheogoric army may never ally with the forces of Jyggalag.
  • Different Great Houses lists in the Great Houses of Morrowind may ally with one another. A Lone Hero Nerevarine and House Hlaalu use the same allying rules with other armies, as do Houses Redoran, Dres and Indoril share the same rules. Telvanni uses its own alliance rules.

As with the primary detachment, there are compulsory choices.

Allied Detachment:

Heroes:

1 Hero must be taken.

Core:

At least 1 Core units must be taken. A 2nd Core unit may be taken.

Elite:

0-1 Elite units may be taken.

Support:

0-1 Support units may be taken.

Bear in mind that some combinations of armies and allies are more effective (and more eagerly entered into) than others - this is covered in detail later in the section (see page XX).

Non-Standard Missions

Some missions, such as those presented in supplements, use different Force Organisation charts. Where this is the case, ally alterations or substitutions will be explained there.

Special Characters

Tamriel, through all ages, has been filled with famous characters renowned as legendary heroes or infamous villains - these unique individuals, who stand out from normal characters because they have a personal name and not just a title, are called 'special characters' Special characters are highly skilled and dangerous heroes who have incredible traits or skills that make them particularly valuable to an army.

For example, Divayth Fyr is without doubt the most ancient and powerful wizard in Morrowind, if not in the entire world. He has dwelt in his tower for millennia, perfecting the magic of Oblivion, as well as of the biology of creatures, and offering advice and assistance to many other important figures throughout the ages.

On the other hand, Hircine, Daedric Prince of the Hunt, lives only for the thrill of tracking and slaying his foes across planes of existence; he appears in battle in the form of either a man, a wolf, or a bear, and stalks both men and animals, both merely prey for the taking.

Unique:

Each special character is unique, so a player cannot include multiples of the same special character in an army.

Allies[edit]

Alliances are made and broken all the time across Tamriel. From a gaming point of view, taking allies in your army opens up entirely new tactical possibilities, making your already formidable force even more so.

  • A Daedra Cult army and a Daedra Army from the Daedra Cults book may ally. Note that a Sheogoric army may never ally with the forces of Jyggalag.
  • Different Great Houses lists in the Great Houses of Morrowind may ally with one another. A Lone Hero Nerevarine and House Hlaalu use the same allying rules with other armies, as do Houses Redoran, Dres and Indoril share the same rules. Telvanni uses its own alliance rules.
  • Many minor army lists may not be included on this allies chart. Their Army Books will explain how they can ally.

Levels of Alliance[edit]

Of course, very few armies trust one another entirely - if at all. A labyrinthine history of grudges, wars, campaigns and betrayals (intentional or otherwise) have the potential to sour all but the closest alliances - and that's to say nothing of the deep and abiding hatred some armies feel for others. To represent this, we have several categories of alliances, each of which imposes certain effects on the game. The Allies Matrix shows the levels of potential alliance between each army.

Trusted Allies

Battle Brothers are treated as 'friendly units' from all points of view. This means, for example, that Trusted Allies:

  • Can be joined by allied Independent Characters.
  • Are counted as being friendly units for the targeting of spells, shouts, abilities, and so on.
  • Can enter allied Buildings.
  • However, note that not even Trusted Allies can embark in allied transport units.

Grudging Allies

Units in your army treat Grudging Allies as enemy units that cannot be charged, shot, targeted with spells, shouts, or other abilities, or have templates or blast markers placed over them, and vice versa.

However, if a spell, scattering Blast weapon or other ability that affects an area hits some of these Grudging Allies, they will be affected along with any friendly or enemy units. This means that, for example, Grudging Allies units:

  • Cannot be joined by allied Independent Characters.
  • Are not counted as friendly units for the targeting of shouts, abilities or spells.

Grudging Allies can be fled through as normal, however, and your units may move freely within 1" of theirs.

Desperate Allies

Desperate Allies are treated exactly like Grudging Allies. Furthermore, if your primary detachment is in a desperate alliance, units from that allied detachment are nonscoring, non-denial units.

In addition, the One Eye Open special rule applies.

  • One Eye Open: At the start of each of your Movement phases, each of your units within 6" of a Desperate Ally unit must roll a D6 - on a roll of a 1, that unit cannot move, shoot, run or assault that turn (they're too busy watching for betrayal). Your units cannot flee through Desperate Allies, or even move within 1" of Desperate Allies except when they would be allowed to move within 1" of enemies(i.e. charges).

Cannot Ally

Simply put, this kind of alliance cannot occur - there's too much bad blood between these two armies. You'll have to look elsewhere for aid.

Alliance Chart[edit]

Allychart.png

Chart by FatherDuke.

Fighting A Battle[edit]

This section presents the Standard Missions: scenarios where the armies are of roughly the same size and the situation gives neither side a particular advantage. As a result, it is not necessary to know what Standard Mission you will be playing before selecting an army, only the agreed points value of the two battling armies. Once you know that, and you have selected your force, simply turn up and play.

Each Standard Mission contains the information you need to get set up and playing.This information is broken down into the following categories: The Armies, The Mission, Deployment, First Turn, Game Length, Victory Conditions and Mission Special Rules.

The Mission[edit]

There are two ways that you can choose which Eternal War mission to use. The first is to agree with your opponent which Standard Mission to play. The second is to pick randomly, by rolling a D6 and consulting the following chart:

1: Season Unending

2: Held Ground

3: Blood at Dawn

4: Quest for the Relic

5: Heart of the Battle

6: Field of Glory


Set Up Terrain[edit]

Next, the players must set up the terrain for the battle. There are two ways you can go about this - narrative or alternating.

  • Battlefield Size: This section assumes that you are playing on a battlefield that can be divided equally into 2' by 2' sections. If your battlefield is of a size that cannot be thus divided, then instead divide it into a number of equal sections as close to 2' by 2' as possible.

Narrative Terrain

If you're using this method, you and your opponent can set the terrain up in any mutually agreeable manner in order to create a fantastic-looking and evocative battlefield.

As you set up the scenery for your battle, try to make it look as much like a real battlefield as possible. A game is always better if you're telling a story, and the ground over which you fight is only slightly less important than the armies fighting over it.

Alternating Terrain

If you and your opponent can't agree on a narrative to help you set up the terrain, you should use this method instead.

Pool all the terrain pieces you have available, and that you wish to use in this game. The only exceptions to this are fortifications that have been purchased as part of a player's army - these will already have been deployed. Determine how many pieces of terrain can go into each 2' by 2' area of game board by rolling a D6 for each. On a 1-3, one piece of terrain may be placed there. On a 4-6, up to two pieces may be placed there. This is known as the terrain density limit.

Once each area's terrain density limit is known, take it in turns, starring with the player who chose table halves, to deploy a piece of terrain. Each 'piece' of terrain should be a single substantial element (such as a building, forest or ruin) or a cluster of up to three smaller pieces of terrain (such as battlefield debris). Terrain can be placed anywhere on the board where it is more than 3" from other terrain.

Players can keep placing terrain until they decide to stop, or they reach the maximum terrain density limit for all of the 2' by 2' areas on the table, or there are no terrain pieces left to place. If a terrain piece is placed so that it straddles more than one 2' by 2' area, it counts towards the terrain density limit in the area in which the majority of the terrain piece lies. If one player chooses to stop placing terrain, their opponent is free to keep on placing terrain until they decide to stop, reach the terrain density limit or run out of terrain pieces in their collection.

After all terrain has been placed, players may wish to move or shuffle terrain around a bit in order to make a more aesthetically pleasing battlefield. If both players agree, you should move any terrain you wish in order to create the best looking board possible.

Place Objective Markers[edit]

Many of the Standard Missions require the players to place objectives. An objective is usually a point on the battlefield of particular importance to one or both of the armies. These points are designated by using objective markers, coins or other counters around 1 to 2 inches in diameter. If objectives need to be set up, the mission in question will contain details on how many need to placed and any special instructions for how to place them on the battlefield.

Unless instructed otherwise in the mission, starting with the player who chose their table half first, take it in turns to set up objectives according to the following rules:

  • No objective can be placed within 6" of any battlefield edge or within 12" of another objective.
  • No objective can be placed in, or on, impassible terrain or buildings.

If there are a lot of objectives, or a lot of terrain, you may sometimes find that the last few are impossible to place using the above rules. When this occurs, simply nudge the other objectives by the smallest distance necessary to allow the last ones to be placed.

Deployment[edit]

Deploy Forces

Armies are placed within the owning player's deployment zone. In Standard Missions, a player's deployment zone is defined as anywhere in their own table half that is more than 12" from the central line dividing the board into two equal halves(see Standard Mission Rules below for further information). Roll-off to see which player chooses whether to deploy first or second. The player that goes first then places his entire army on the table in his deployment zone(with the exception of Mission 3, see below for details). His opponent then deploys his entire army in the opposite deployment zone. Units cannot deploy in impassible terrain or lethal terrain.

Deploying Infiltrators and Redeploying Scouts

The sequence for Infiltrators and Scouts is the same in all Standard Missions. First, both players deploy their forces (apart from any units left kept as Reserves or that chose to use their Infiltrate special rule). When both players have deployed their main force, then they deploy their Infiltrators (as described on page XX). Finally, they can redeploy units with the Scouts special rule (see page XX).

For the purposes of deploying Infiltrators and redeploying Scouts, a building or other terrain piece deployed as part of an opponent's army is only considered to be an enemy unit if it is occupied at the time of the redeployment.

Deploying Multiple Unit Choices

Note that, occasionally, an army book will allow a player to include several units in his army at the cost of a single Force Organisation slot. Apart from being bought as a single choice, these units operate and count as separate units in all respects.

Start the Game[edit]

Seize the Initiative!

If a player who is due to go second wishes to Seize the Initiative, he can roll a D6 before the beginning of the first turn. On a roll of a 6, he successfully seizes the initiative and goes first instead. His army has clearly outwitted that of his opponent!

Game Length

Variable Game Length:

At the end of game turn 5, one of the players must roll a D6. On a roll of 3+ the game continues, otherwise the game is over. If another turn is played, another D6 must be rolled at the end of game turn 6, and this time, the game only continues on a roll of 4 +. The battle automatically ends at the close of game turn 7.

Victory Conditions

In the Standard Missions, each army is seeking to accrue more Victory Points than the opposing force. Victory Points are acquired by completing mission objectives, and the winner is the army with the most Victory Points at the end of the game. Indeed, if the winner has twice the Victory Points of his opponent, it can be considered a crushing victory! If both armies have the same number of Victory Points, the game is a tactical draw. If one player concedes the battle, or his entire army is wiped out, the game ends and a crushing victory goes to his opponent. Likewise, if at the end of any game turn, one player has no models on the battlefield, his opponent automatically wins.

Mission Objectives

To determine the number of Victory Points an army has earned, we use mission objectives. These are the goals your army will have to achieve, and they thus dictate the tactics that you'll have to employ during the battle. The number and types of mission objectives vary from mission to mission.

In some scenarios, there may be objective markers to be controlled. The rules for them listed in this section.

Controlling Objectives:

You control an objective marker if there is at least one model from one of your scoring units, and no models from enemy denial units, within 3" of it. As different objectives vary in shape and size, it is important to agree at the beginning of the game exactly from where this distance will be measured.

A unit can only control one objective at a time. If a unit moves into a position where it could control two objectives, you must make it clear to your opponent which objective the unit is controlling.

Scoring Units:

The concept of scoring units is central to several of the Standard Missions, which are won or lost by controlling more objectives than the enemy at the end of the game (see those missions victory conditions), and only scoring units can do that. During a long campaign, the greatest heroes ride ahead and take important ground. They then press on, engaging the enemy with lightning fast attacks and irresistible charges. It is left to the common soldiers, the marching companies that make up the bulk of any army, to dig in and consolidate any territorial gains, securing the objectives from any enemy counter-attack.

An army's scoring units are normally all the units that come from the Core selection of the Force Organisation chart. The presence of other units within 3" of an objective may deny an objective to the enemy, but only Core units can control it.

There are a few exceptions, however, when a Core unit does not count as a scoring unit:

  • If it is a building or a piece of terrain, rather than a unit proper.
  • If it has the Swarms special rule.
  • If it has a special rule specifying that it never counts as a scoring unit.
  • If it is currently falling back (if the unit Regroups it immediately reverts to being a scoring unit again).

Denial Units:

Denial units are those squads that can prevent an enemy from controlling an objective. In the Eternal War missions, all units (including troops) are denial units, save for a few exceptions given below:

  • If it is a building or a piece of terrain, rather than a unit proper.
  • If it has a special rule specifying that it never counts as a denial unit. (Swarms do count as denial units)
  • If it is currently falling back (if the unit Regroups it immediately reverts to being a denial unit again).

Standard Mission Rules[edit]

Night Fighting

If a mission has the Night Fighting special rule, roll a D6 before deployment: on a roll of 4+,the Night Fighting special rule is in effect during game turn 1. If the Night Fighting rules did not take effect during game turn 1, roll a D6 at the start of Game Turn 5, On a roll of 4+, the Night Fighting rules are used for the rest of the game. On a roll of 3 or less, you must roll again at the start of every subsequent game turn - as soon as a roll of 4+ is rolled, the Night Fighting rules come into play for the rest of the game.

Picking a Target and Night Fighting:

While the Night Fighting rules are in effect, the distance to a target unit becomes very important - the darkness makes it very difficult to acquire distant targets. The shooting unit cannot pick a target more than 36" away - such units are completely hidden in the darkness. Units between 24" and 36" inches away are treated as having the Stealth(+2) special rule. Units between 12" and up to 24" away are instead treated as having the Stealth(+1) special rule. Units less than 12" away can be shot at normally. If a shooting attack scatters, the distance from the firing unit to the original target is used to determine what effect Night Fighting has. This means that a unit that is over 36" away can still potentially be hit.

Night Fighting is considered a Weather effect.

Reserves

Reserves are forces that can be called upon to reinforce a battle at short notice, or to conceal your true strength frorn the foe.

Preparing reserves:

When deploying their armies, players can choose not to deploy up to any number of their units(except in Standard Mission 3, see below for details), keeping them as Reserves to arrive later. During deployment, when declaring which units are kept as Reserves, the player must clearly explain the organisation of his Reserves to the opponent.

First, he must specify to the opponent if any of his Independent Characters left in reserve are joining a unit, in which case they will arrive together. Similarly, the player must specify if any units in reserve are embarked upon any transport units in reserve, in which case they will arrive together.

Arriving from Reserve:

At the start of your Turn Two, you must roll a D6 for each unit being held in reserve - these are known as Reserve Rolls. If the roll is a 3 or more, that unit arrives this turn. If the roll is less than 3 it remains in reserve and is rolled for again next turn. At the start of your Turn Three, roll for any units remaining in reserve. If the roll is a 3 or more, that unit arrives this turn. If the roll is less than 3, it remains in reserve and automatically arrives at the start of Turn Four.

Some special rules can modify the roll required for a unit to arrive from reserve. Regardless of the modifier(s), a natural roll of a 1 always means that the unit in question remains in reserve.

If an Independent Character has joined a unit in reserve, it cannot leave the unit whilst in reserve, and it cannot choose to leave the unit on the turn it arrives from reserve.

When rolling to see when they arrive from reserve, roll a single dice for both the Independent Character and its unit.

When Reserves arrive, the player picks any one of the units arriving and deploys it, moving it onto the table as described below. Then he picks another unit and deploys it, and so on until all arriving units are on the table. The player can then proceed to move his other units as normal.

When a Reserves unit arrives, it must move fully onto the table from the controlling player's own table edge (maps and diagrams illustrating table edges for the different deployment methods are shown on page XX). Models that are arriving by Deep strike or Outflank deploy using their special rules (see page XX).

Each model's move is measured from the edge of the battlefield, as if they had been positioned just off the board in the previous turn and moved as normal. This means it is incorrect to place a model on the board touching the edge and then move it - this would mean it moved too far, especially in the case of models with larger bases. If for some reason a model's maximum move is insufficient to fit the entire model onto the board, place the model so that its rear end is touching the board edge - the model cannot move further during the Movement phase, nor may it shoot or march.

If a unit has a special rule forcing it to move in a specific direction or that could stop it from moving, the rule is ignored in the phase when it arrives from reserve.

Certain rare units are permanently immobile. If a unit like this cannot be deployed, or the player decides to keep it in reserve, it enters the game by Deep Strike. This represents the immobile unit drilling up from underneath or being dropped onto the battlefield.

Unless stated otherwise, a unit cannot use any abilities or special rules that must be used at the start of the turn, in the turn it arrives from reserve. A unit's arrival from reserve always counts as that unit's movement in the movement phase. A unit that arrives by Deep Strike may not charge the turn it arrives, either.

Models that must arrive from reserve always do so, regardless of whether or not the Reserves mission rule is in effect.

Ongoing Reserves:

If a unit enters reserve part way through the game, for whatever reason, this is referred to as entering Ongoing Reserves. Units in Ongoing Reserve always re-enter play at the start of their controlling player's following turn, but otherwise follow the normal rules for Reserves. If a unit is in Ongoing Reserve when the game ends, it awards Victory Points as if it had been destroyed.

Scenario I: Season Unending[edit]

Long have the two great armies struggled across this once fertile land. Again they clash; will this be the end of this long and arduous campaign? Or merely another chapter, another feud, another spill of blood?

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line from short end to short end, dividing the table into two equal halves across its length. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

Deployment

Players deploy as normal.

First Turn

The player who deployed his army first goes first, unless his opponent steals the initiative.

Victory Conditions

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each enemy unit that has been completely destroyed, is falling back, or is not on the board at the time the game ends. Independent Characters count as a separate Victory Point for the purposes of this scenario.

The player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

Mission Special Rules

Night Fighting, Reserves, Variable Game Length

Scenario II: Held Ground[edit]

The war has come to a standstill. Across a distant battlefield, a battle rages that may turn the tide in favor of one side or the other.

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line across a diagonal chosen by the player who won the roll to pick his side of the table. The board is divided into halves across this diagonal, from one corner to the opposite corner. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

After terrain has been set up, the players take it in turns(starting with the player who picked a side of the table) to place 4 objective markers(see page XX).

Deployment

Players deploy as normal.

First Turn

The player who deployed his army first goes first, unless his opponent steals the initiative.

Victory Conditions

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each Objective he is holding(uncontested by any denial units) at the end of the game.

The player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

Mission Special Rules

Night Fighting, Reserves, Variable Game Length

Scenario III: Blood at Dawn[edit]

One army has sent out a raiding party to make a surprise attack! Will their enemies be able to overcome them? Or will they triumph, when reinforcements arrive?

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line across a diagonal chosen by the player who won the roll to pick his side of the table. The board is divided into halves across this diagonal, from one corner to the opposite corner. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

Deployment

The player who deploys first must always deploy or Inflitrate at least half of his units(Independent Characters count as units for the purpose of this scenario), not counting units that must always be placed in reserves. He may choose to deploy the other half as normal, or keep any number of them in reserve.

The player who deploys second must deploy one Hero and one Core unit if possible; they may be Infiltrated. The player who deploys second may also deploy number of other units with either Infiltrate or Scout. All other units in his army must be kept in reserve(you may choose how they arrive from reserve, as normal).

First Turn

The player who deployed his army second always automatically steals the initiative!

Victory Conditions

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each enemy unit that has been completely destroyed, is falling back, or is not on the board at the time the game ends. Independent Characters count as a separate Victory Point for the purposes of this scenario.

The player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

If all of the units of a player who stole the initiative are destroyed before any of his other units arrive from reserve(not counting Summoned units), that player loses the game automatically.

Mission Special Rules

Reserves, Variable Game Length

The Shimmer of Dawn:

It is always Night Fighting the first turn. At the start of Turn 2, roll a d6. On a 1-3, it is no longer Night Fighting. On a 4+, it continues to be Night Fighting. If it is still Night Fighting at the start of Turn 3 due to this scenario rule, roll a d6. On a 1-4, it is no longer Night Fighting. On a 5+, it continues to be Night Fighting. If it is still Night Fighting at the start of Turn 4 due to this scenario rule, roll a d6. On a 1-5, it is no longer Night Fighting. On a 6, it continues to be Night Fighting. Night Fighting caused by this scenario rule automatically ends at the end of turn 4.

Scenario IV: Quest for the Relic[edit]

An ancient artifact of immense power lies hidden in the ground. Two great armies clash to claim it as their own.

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line from short end to short end, dividing the table into two equal halves across its length. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

No impassable or lethal terrain may be placed at the center of the table.

After terrain has been set up, place a single, small marker at the center of the table. This represents the Relic.

Deployment

Players deploy as normal.

First Turn

The player who deployed his army first goes first, unless his opponent steals the initiative.

Victory Conditions

The player who has captured the Relic(by moving the unit carrying it off the table along his edge) wins.

If the game ends and neither player has captured the Relic in this manner, each player receives 1 Victory Point for each enemy unit that has been completely destroyed, is falling back, or is not on the board at the time the game ends. Independent Characters count as a separate Victory Point for the purposes of this scenario. In this case, the player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

Mission Special Rules

Night Fighting, Reserves, Variable Game Length

The Relic[edit]

The following rules cover seizing, moving and dropping the Relic.

Seizing the Relic:

A model in a scoring unit or an Independent Character can seize the Relic by moving into base contact during the Movement phase - that model then automatically picks it up at the end of the phase. From that point, the Relic remains with the model (move the Relic with the model to show this) until it is dropped, which can happen voluntarily, but happens automatically if the model is slain.

Identifying the Relic:

When the Relic is seized, immediately roll a 2d6 to see what sort of item it is!

  • 2- Dust and Mothballs: The warriors have found an empty chest. Their hopes are dashed. The Relic is removed from play. The unit that would have seized it still cannot march or charge this turn(see below).
  • 3- Cursed Jewel: This Relic is a priceless treasure, but bears a deadly curse! Models shooting at or attacking the unit carrying the Relic get +1 to hit.
  • 4- Buried Treasure: This Relic does not have any additional special rules.
  • 5- Forgelord's Gauntlets: This relic counts as wargear in the inventory of the model holding it. Gauntlets, Artifact. This model gets +1 to his armour save and is Immune to Fire. If the model holding it is already wearing Gauntlets, he cannot use this relic, but may still carry it as if it did not have any additional special rules.
  • 6- Ancient Wine: This Relic is so fragile, that its bearer and his unit cannot march or charge while they hold it.
  • 7- Stone of Barenziah: This Relic does not have any additional special rules.
  • 8- Thunder Blade: This relic counts as wargear in the inventory of the model holding it. Hand Weapon, Artifact. This weapon is a magic weapon that deals Shock damage, and its hits cause Magicka Drain(total) and Paralysis until the end of next turn.
  • 9- Icewall Shield: This relic counts as wargear in the inventory of the model holding it. Shield, Artifact. Bearer is Immune to Frost. If bearer makes an armour save or successfully Parries in close combat, every model in the unit that inflicted the wound he saved becomes Chilled until the end of next turn.
  • 10- Autographed Copy of The Lusty Argonian Maid: Crassius Curio's famed comedy unfortunately has little use in war, other than for reading aloud around a campfire. This Relic does not have any additional special rules.
  • 11- Staff of Everscamp: The warrior who picks up and examines the staff is immediately swarmed by a host of Daedric pests. Even worse, he finds himself unable to put it down! This Relic cannot be voluntarily dropped, and the model carrying it gets -1 to hit and cannot Parry.
  • 12- Magical Anomaly: An unexpected and bizarre magical force erupts around the relic. Each model in the unit carrying the relic gets +2 Mg, but must always move as if through Difficult Terrain. All weapons in units with 6" of the Relic have the Backfire special rule(see page XX).

Moving with the Relic:

The Relic is fragile, and swift movement will likely damage it, so the model carrying the Relic cannot march or charge the turn it is seized, and can never move more than 6" in the movement phase. If it is forced to do so, the Relic is immediately dropped. A model with the Relic can embark on a transport, but the transport unit cannot move more than 6" per phase whilst the Relic is carried on board, or else it will be dropped. A model carrying the Relic can transfer it to any friendly model that is part of a scoring unit if the two models end their Movement phase in base contact. Move the counter to the new bearer to show who is currently holding the Relic. The Relic can only be passed to a friendly model once per Movement phase.

Dropping the Relic:

The controlling player can choose to have his model drop the Relic at any time, in which case he places the counter 1 " away from the model. If the model falls back, or is removed as a casualty, the Relic is dropped automatically. If the Relic is dropped in impassable terrain, place it as close as possible to the point where it was dropped that is not impassable terrain.

Capturing the Relic:

A unit that holds the Relic can move off its controlling player's board edge with it, as if falling back, if it makes it there! If for whatever reason the Relic is dropped(such as the model carrying it being killed by Dangerous Terrain) before the move is complete, the unit is placed into Ongoing Reserves, and the Relic is placed touching the board edge. The player who takes the Relic off the board in this manner wins the game!

Scenario V: Heart of the Battle[edit]

The hosts are massive, the air is hot and thick with blood-scent. Each player's force attempts to gain a hold on priceless ground, as the battle rages all around them.

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line from short end to short end, dividing the table into two equal halves across its length. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

No impassable or lethal terrain may be placed at the center of the table.

After terrain has been set up, place a single objective marker at the center of the table.

Deployment

Players deploy as normal.

First Turn

The player who deployed his army first goes first, unless his opponent steals the initiative.

Victory Conditions

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each enemy unit that has been completely destroyed, is falling back, or is not on the board at the time the game ends. Independent Characters count as a separate Victory Point for the purposes of this scenario.

If one of a player's scoring units is holding(uncontested by any denial units) the center objective marker at the end of the game, that player received 4 Victory Points.

The player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

Mission Special Rules

Night Fighting, Reserves, Variable Game Length

Scenario VI: Field of Glory[edit]

At noon-day, the armies face off against one another across a great plain. A final battle is at hand, a day in which heroes will make names for themselves, or else perish and be altogether forgotten.

The Battlefield

When determining each player's table edge, draw a center line from short end to short end, dividing the table into two equal halves across its length. Each of the long edges of the table forms a player's board edge.

Deployment

Players deploy as normal.

First Turn

The player who deployed his army first goes first, unless his opponent steals the initiative.

Victory Conditions

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each enemy unit that has been completely destroyed, is falling back, or is not on the board at the time the game ends. Independent Characters count as a separate Victory Point for the purposes of this scenario.

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each Standard that has been taken: for each Standard Bearer a player's forces slay in close combat, or catch while falling back(including in a sweeping advance), that player gets a point.

Each player receives 1 Victory Point for each character his own characters have slain in a challenge: in addition, the controlling player of the character who won the most challenges gains 1 bonus Victory Point(if there is a tie for most challenges won between characters controlled by different players, neither player gets this point).

The player with the most Victory Points at the end of the game wins. If both players have the same number of Victory Points, the game ends in a draw.

Mission Special Rules

Reserves, Variable Game Length